TOP rondje Harz
Published: 24/03/2017
Okerstausee
The route has been checked and approved. The route is also created for TomTom, Garmin and MyRoute-app Navigation users. You start and end at a good and affordable hotel. The red route points, shown in MyRoute-app Navigation, are stop points. The yellow waypoints are sights, the green route points photo moments, of course you decide yourself whether you stop or not. It is nice to drive in the Harz, especially in the spring there are regular roadworks. You can open the route in MyRoute-app, if necessary adapt to your needs and drive!
Rappode dam
Stolberg
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Disclaimer:

Using this GPS route is for your own account and risk. The route has been compiled with care and checked by a MyRoute-app accredited RouteXpert for use on both TomTom, Garmin and MyRoute-app Navigation. Due to changed circumstances, road diversions or seasonal closures there may be changes, so we recommend checking every route before use. Preferably use the routetrack in your navigation system. For more information about the use of MyRoute-app, please visit the website at 'Community 'or' Webinars'.

Waypoint, used to construct the route
Sight, here you can see something
Viewpoint, a short stop for taking a picture
Stopping point, for hotel, lunch, etc
Attention, see the text in the waypoint for more information

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Michel van Hagen (MRA-Founder)
Niedersachsen
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Niedersachsen", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Lower Saxony (German: Niedersachsen (German pronunciation: [ˈniːdɐzaksn̩] (listen)); Low German: Neddersassen) is a German state (Land) situated in northwestern Germany. It is the second-largest state by land area, with 47,624 km2 (18,388 sq mi), and fourth-largest in population (7.9 million) among the 16 Länder federated as the Federal Republic of Germany. In rural areas, Northern Low Saxon (a dialect of Low German) and Saterland Frisian (a variety of the Frisian language) are still spoken, but the number of speakers is declining. Lower Saxony borders on (from north and clockwise) the North Sea, the states of Schleswig-Holstein, Hamburg, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Brandenburg, Saxony-Anhalt, Thuringia, Hesse and North Rhine-Westphalia, and the Netherlands (Drenthe, Groningen and Overijssel). Furthermore, the state of Bremen forms two enclaves within Lower Saxony, one being the city of Bremen, the other, its seaport city of Bremerhaven. In fact, Lower Saxony borders more neighbours than any other single Bundesland. The state's principal cities include the state capital Hanover, Braunschweig (Brunswick), Lüneburg, Osnabrück, Oldenburg, Hildesheim, Wolfenbüttel, Wolfsburg, and Göttingen. The northwestern area of Lower Saxony, which lies on the coast of the North Sea, is called East Frisia and the seven East Frisian Islands offshore are popular with tourists. In the extreme west of Lower Saxony is the Emsland, a traditionally poor and sparsely populated area, once dominated by inaccessible swamps. The northern half of Lower Saxony, also known as the North German Plains, is almost invariably flat except for the gentle hills around the Bremen geestland. Towards the south and southwest lie the northern parts of the German Central Uplands: the Weser Uplands and the Harz mountains. Between these two lie the Lower Saxon Hills, a range of low ridges. Thus, Lower Saxony is the only Bundesland that encompasses both maritime and mountainous areas. Lower Saxony's major cities and economic centres are mainly situated in its central and southern parts, namely Hanover, Braunschweig, Osnabrück, Wolfsburg, Salzgitter, Hildesheim, and Göttingen. Oldenburg, near the northwestern coastline, is another economic centre. The region in the northeast is called the Lüneburg Heath (Lüneburger Heide), the largest heathland area of Germany and in medieval times wealthy due to salt mining and salt trade, as well as to a lesser degree the exploitation of its peat bogs until about the 1960s. To the north, the Elbe River separates Lower Saxony from Hamburg, Schleswig-Holstein, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, and Brandenburg. The banks just south of the Elbe are known as Altes Land (Old Country). Due to its gentle local climate and fertile soil, it is the state's largest area of fruit farming, its chief produce being apples. Most of the state's territory was part of the historic Kingdom of Hanover; the state of Lower Saxony has adopted the coat of arms and other symbols of the former kingdom. It was created by the merger of the State of Hanover with three smaller states on 1 November 1946.
14
Amount of visits (Niedersachsen)
23
Amount of routes verified by RouteXperts (Niedersachsen)
233
Amount of downloaded routes (Niedersachsen)