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The prettiest verified routes in Netherlands

MyRoute-app helps you with planning your dream journey! All routes on the page have been verified by our Route Experts. De routes are categorized in regions, when you click on 'view region' you will see all verified routes for that region that are free to use.
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12
Amount of active Route Experts (worldwide)
84
Amount of routes reviewd by Route Experts (worldwide)
611
Amount of downloaded routes (worldwide)
2834
Amount of visits (Netherlands)
22
Amount of routes verified by Route Experts (Netherlands)
83
Amount of downloaded routes (Netherlands)
5
Routes
1806.45
Kilometers
31.25
Hours
Show region map
NordrheinWestfalen Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "NordrheinWestfalen", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
North Rhine-Westphalia (German: Nordrhein-Westfalen, pronounced [ˈnɔɐ̯tʁaɪ̯n vɛstˈfaːlən] (listen), commonly shortened to NRW; French: Rhénanie-du-Nord-Westphalie; Dutch: Noordrijn-Westfalen) is a state of Germany. North Rhine-Westphalia is located in western Germany covering an area of 34,084 square kilometres (13,160 sq mi) and with a population of 17.6 million, the most populous and the most densely populated German state apart from the city-states of Berlin, Bremen, and Hamburg, and the fourth-largest by area. Düsseldorf is the state capital and Cologne is the largest city. North Rhine-Westphalia features four of Germany's 10 largest cities: Düsseldorf, Cologne, Dortmund, and Essen, and the Rhine-Ruhr metropolitan area, the largest in Germany and the third-largest on the European continent. North Rhine-Westphalia was established in 1946 after World War II from the Prussian provinces of Westphalia and the northern part of Rhine Province (North Rhine), and the Free State of Lippe by the British military administration in Allied-occupied Germany. North Rhine-Westphalia became a state of the Federal Republic of Germany in 1949, and the city of Bonn served as the federal capital until the reunification of Germany in 1990 and as the seat of government until 1999.
1
Routes
235.17
Kilometers
3.92
Hours
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Almere Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Almere", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Almere (Dutch pronunciation: [ɑlˈmeːrə] (listen)) is a planned city and municipality in the province of Flevoland, Netherlands, bordering Lelystad and Zeewolde. The municipality of Almere comprises six official areas that are the districts of Almere Stad (which is further split up into Almere Stad Oost, Almere Stad West and Almere Centrum), Almere Buiten and Almere Pampus (which is currently being designed), and the boroughs of Almere Haven, Almere Hout and Almere Poort. Four of them feature official district or borough offices. Furthermore, it also comprises the unofficial historic district and neighborhood Oostvaardersdiep, which has an active semi-self-governing community, and the planned district of Almere Oosterwold. Almere is part of the Amsterdam Metropolitan Area (MRA). Almere is the newest city in the Netherlands: the land on which the city sits, the Southern Flevoland polder, was reclaimed from the IJsselmeer from 1959 to 1968. The first house was finished in 1976, and Almere became a municipality in 1984. It has the largest population of the municipalities in Flevoland with 202,764 citizens in 2017 and the 7th largest in the Netherlands. In October 2007, the city council of Almere made agreements with the government to expand the city to 350,000 inhabitants by 2030.
2
Routes
470.24
Kilometers
9.59
Hours
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Weerribben Wieden Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Weerribben Wieden", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The Weerribben-Wieden National Park is a national park of the Netherlands in the Steenwijkerland municipality of the province of Overijssel. Comprising the largest bog of northwestern Europe, the park consists of two areas, De Weerribben and De Wieden, and has an area of roughly 100 square kilometres (39 sq mi). The park was founded in 1982, but De Wieden was added only in 2009.
2
Routes
305.73
Kilometers
7.16
Hours
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Valkenswaard Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Valkenswaard", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Valkenswaard (pronunciation ) is a municipality and a town in the southern Netherlands, in the Metropoolregio Eindhoven of the province of North Brabant. The municipality had a population of 30,615 in 2017 and spans an area of 56.49 km2 (21.81 sq mi) of which 1.48 km2 (0.57 sq mi) is water. The name Valkenswaard stems from its history of falconers, who caught wild falcons there; valk is Dutch for "falcon". It lay on a route where falcons migrated south each year. In the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries, Valkenswaardian falconers were active at many European courts, in which falconing was a beloved pastime. Valkenswaard's falcon-catching area has now been built over and falcons are no longer caught there. In the 19th and 20th century, a number of large cigar factories were founded in Valkenswaard, the two most renowned of which being Willem II and Hofnar. The spoken language is Kempenlands (an East Brabantian dialect, which is very similar to colloquial Dutch).The Eurocircuit Valkenswaard is a motorsport racetrack that has hosted the European Rallycross Championship and the FIM Motocross World Championship.
1
Routes
433.54
Kilometers
8.61
Hours
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Luik Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Luik", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Luik is an Estonian surname meaning "swan". It may refer to: Aivi Luik (born 1985), Australian football player Helmuth Luik (1928–2009), Estonian chess player John Luik (born 1950), American philosopher Jüri Luik (born 1966), Estonian politician and diplomat Liina Luik (born 1985), Estonian long-distance runner, one of triplet Lily Luik (born 1985), Estonian long-distance runner, one of triplet Leila Luik (born 1985), Estonian long-distance runner, one of triplet Siret Luik (born 1986), Estonian recurve archer Viivi Luik (born 1946), Estonian author
1
Routes
211.52
Kilometers
4.73
Hours
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Lekdijk Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Lekdijk", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Perpetual bond, which is also known as a perpetual or just a perp, is a bond with no maturity date. Therefore, it may be treated as equity, not as debt. Issuers pay coupons on perpetual bonds forever, and they do not have to redeem the principal. Perpetual bond cash flows are, therefore, those of a perpetuity.
1
Routes
139.75
Kilometers
3.08
Hours
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Vlagtwedde Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Vlagtwedde", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Vlagtwedde (Dutch pronunciation: [ˈvlɑxˌtʋɛdə] (listen)) is a village in the very southeast of Groningen province in the northeastern Netherlands. It lies on the Dutch border with the German state of Lower Saxony to the east.
2
Routes
344.91
Kilometers
7.97
Hours
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Tiel Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Tiel", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Tiel (Dutch pronunciation: [til] (listen)) is a municipality and a town in the middle of the Netherlands. The town is enclosed by the Waal river and the Linge river on the south and the north side, and the Amsterdam-Rhine Canal on the east side. The city was founded in the 5th century AD.
1
Routes
212.05
Kilometers
4.81
Hours
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Nationaal Park de Hoge Veluwe Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Nationaal Park de Hoge Veluwe", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Nationaal Park De Hoge Veluwe (English: The Hoge Veluwe National Park) is a Dutch national park in the province of Gelderland near the cities of Ede, Wageningen, Arnhem and Apeldoorn. It is approximately 55 square kilometers in area, consisting of heathlands, sand dunes, and woodlands. It is situated in the Veluwe, the area of the largest terminal moraine in the Netherlands. Most of the landscape of the park and the Veluwe was created during the last Ice Age. The alternating sand dune areas and heathlands may have been caused by human utilization of the surrounding lands. The park forms one of the largest continuous nature reserves in the Netherlands.
1
Routes
433.54
Kilometers
8.61
Hours
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Maastricht Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Maastricht", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Maastricht (Dutch: [maːˈstrɪxt] (listen); Limburgish (incl. Maastrichtian): Mestreech [məˈstʀeˑx]; French: Maestricht (archaic); Spanish: Mastrique (archaic)) is a city and a municipality in the southeast of the Netherlands. It is the capital and largest city of the province of Limburg. Maastricht is located on both sides of the Meuse (Dutch: Maas), at the point where the Jeker joins it. It is adjacent to the border with Belgium. Maastricht developed from a Roman settlement to a Medieval religious centre. In the 16th century it became a garrison town and in the 19th century an early industrial city. Today, the town is a thriving cultural and regional hub. It became well-known through the Maastricht Treaty and as the birthplace of the euro. Maastricht has 1677 national heritage buildings (Rijksmonumenten), the second highest number in the Netherlands, after Amsterdam. The town is popular with tourists for shopping and recreation, and has a large international student population. Maastricht is a member of the Most Ancient European Towns Network and is part of the Meuse-Rhine Euroregion, which includes the nearby German and Belgian cities of Aachen, Eupen, Hasselt, Liège, and Tongeren. The Meuse-Rhine Euroregion is a metropolis with a population of about 3.9 million with several international universities.
1
Routes
192.81
Kilometers
5.02
Hours
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Gulpen Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Gulpen", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Gulpen is a village in the Dutch province of Limburg. It is approximately midway between the Dutch city of Maastricht and the German city of Aachen. Gulpen was a separate municipality until 1999, when it merged with Wittem. The newly formed municipality is called Gulpen-Wittem. The town itself derives its name from the river Gulp, which runs straight through the centre of the village and characterises the townscape. There is a Romanesque tower in the old cemetery, which dates from the 11th Century and is the only still existing part of a mediaeval village church. Considering its construction (its walls are up to 2 metres thick) and its location, it probably also served as defence tower, where the local villagers could go in case of danger. The former rectory, which leans against the tower, dates from 1732. It is now being let as luxurious group accommodation. The current Neo-Romanesque St.Petrus church dates from 1924 and was designed by Casper Franssen. A former monastery that was built in 1932 after a design by Alphons Boosten is being used as town hall. The village is home to the Gulpener Brewery. Every year in June, a walking tour of 70 kilometres is organised that is called the Nacht van Gulpen (Night of Gulpen). A little over a thousand people participate in this event each year.
1
Routes
132.87
Kilometers
3.16
Hours
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Geldermalsen Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Geldermalsen", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Geldermalsen (pronunciation ) is a municipality and a town in the province of Gelderland in the Netherlands.
1
Routes
211.52
Kilometers
4.73
Hours
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Krimpen Capelle Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Krimpen Capelle", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Krimpen aan den IJssel (Dutch pronunciation: [ˈkrɪmpə(n) aːn dɛn ˈɛisəl] (listen)) is a town and municipality in the western Netherlands, in the province of South Holland. The municipality had a population of 29,120 in 2017, and covers an area of 8.95 km2 (3.46 sq mi) of which 1.15 km2 (0.44 sq mi) is water.
3
Routes
705.41
Kilometers
13.52
Hours
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Overijssel Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Overijssel", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Overijssel (Dutch pronunciation: [ˌoːvərˈɛisəl] (listen); Dutch Low Saxon: Oaveriessel [ˌɒːvərˈiːsəl]; German: Oberyssel) is a province of the Netherlands located in the eastern part of the country. The province's name translates to "Across the IJssel", from the perspective of the Episcopal principality of Utrecht by which it was held until 1528. The capital city of Overijssel is Zwolle and the largest city is Enschede. The province had a population of 1,142,360 in 2015.
1
Routes
166.92
Kilometers
3.27
Hours
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Berg en Dal Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Berg en Dal", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Berg en Dal may refer to: Berg en Dal (municipality), a municipality in the province of Gelderland, the Netherlands Berg en Dal (village), a village in the municipality of Berg en Dal Berg en Dal (Suriname), a place in Suriname Berg en Dal (Baarn), a villa in Baarn
2
Routes
256.22
Kilometers
5.8
Hours
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Noord Holland Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Noord Holland", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
North Holland (Dutch: Noord-Holland [ˌnoːrt ˈɦɔlɑnt] (listen), West Frisian Dutch: Noard-Holland) is a province of the Netherlands located in the northwestern part of the country. It is situated on the North Sea, north of South Holland and Utrecht, and west of Friesland and Flevoland. In 2015, it had a population of 2,762,163 and a total area of 2,670 km2 (1,030 sq mi). From the 9th to the 16th century, the area was an integral part of the County of Holland. During this period West Friesland was incorporated. In the 17th and 18th century, the area was part of the province of Holland and commonly known as the Noorderkwartier (English: "Northern Quarter"). In 1840, the province of Holland was split into the two provinces of North Holland and South Holland. In 1855, the Haarlemmermeer was drained and turned into land. The capital and seat of the provincial government is Haarlem, and the province's largest city is the Netherlands' capital Amsterdam. The King's Commissioner of North Holland is Johan Remkes, serving since 2010. There are 51 municipalities and three (including parts of) water boards in the province.
2
Routes
256.22
Kilometers
5.8
Hours
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Noord Holland Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Noord Holland", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
North Holland (Dutch: Noord-Holland [ˌnoːrt ˈɦɔlɑnt] (listen), West Frisian Dutch: Noard-Holland) is a province of the Netherlands located in the northwestern part of the country. It is situated on the North Sea, north of South Holland and Utrecht, and west of Friesland and Flevoland. In 2015, it had a population of 2,762,163 and a total area of 2,670 km2 (1,030 sq mi). From the 9th to the 16th century, the area was an integral part of the County of Holland. During this period West Friesland was incorporated. In the 17th and 18th century, the area was part of the province of Holland and commonly known as the Noorderkwartier (English: "Northern Quarter"). In 1840, the province of Holland was split into the two provinces of North Holland and South Holland. In 1855, the Haarlemmermeer was drained and turned into land. The capital and seat of the provincial government is Haarlem, and the province's largest city is the Netherlands' capital Amsterdam. The King's Commissioner of North Holland is Johan Remkes, serving since 2010. There are 51 municipalities and three (including parts of) water boards in the province.
2
Routes
151.96
Kilometers
6.15
Hours
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Utrechtse Heuvelrug Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Utrechtse Heuvelrug", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Utrechtse Heuvelrug (Dutch pronunciation: [ˌytrɛxtsə ˈɦøːvəlrʏx]; English: Utrecht Hill Ridge) is a municipality in the Netherlands, in the province of Utrecht. It was formed on 1 January 2006 by merging the former municipalities of Amerongen, Doorn, Driebergen-Rijsenburg, Leersum, and Maarn.
5
Routes
1806.45
Kilometers
31.25
Hours
Show region map
Limburg Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Limburg", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Limburg or Limbourg may refer to:
1
Routes
139.75
Kilometers
3.08
Hours
Show region map
Oude Pekela Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Oude Pekela", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Oude Pekela (Dutch pronunciation: [ˈʌudə ˈpeːkəlaː]) is a village in the Dutch province of Groningen. It is located in the municipality of Pekela, about 5 km southwest of Winschoten. Oude Pekela was a separate municipality until 1990, when it merged with Nieuwe Pekela.
1
Routes
175.72
Kilometers
3.9
Hours
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Zeeland Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Zeeland", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Zeeland (; Dutch pronunciation: [ˈzeːlɑnt] (listen), Zeelandic: Zeêland [ˈzɪə̯lɑnt], historical English exonym Zealand) is the westernmost and least populous province of the Netherlands. The province, located in the south-west of the country, consists of a number of islands and peninsulas (hence its name, meaning "Sealand") and a strip bordering Belgium. Its capital is Middelburg. Its area is about 2,930 square kilometres (1,130 sq mi), of which almost 1,140 square kilometres (440 sq mi) is water, and it has a population of about 380,000. Large parts of Zeeland are below sea level. The last great flooding of the area was in 1953. Tourism is an important economic activity. In the summer, its beaches make it a popular destination for tourists, especially German tourists. In some areas, the population can be two to four times higher during the high summer season. The coat of arms of Zeeland shows a lion half-emerged from water, and the text luctor et emergo (Latin for "Ik worstel en kom boven" (I struggle and emerge)). The country of New Zealand was named after Zeeland after it was sighted by Dutch explorer Abel Tasman.
5
Routes
924.14
Kilometers
19.1
Hours
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Friesland Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Friesland", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Friesland (Dutch pronunciation: [ˈfrislɑnt] (listen); official, West Frisian: Fryslân [ˈfrislɔːn] (listen)), also historically known as Frisia, is a province of the Netherlands located in the northern part of the country. It is situated west of Groningen, northwest of Drenthe and Overijssel, north of Flevoland, northeast of North Holland, and south of the Wadden Sea. In 2015, the province had a population of 646,092 and a total area of 5,100 km2 (2,000 sq mi). The capital and seat of the provincial government is the city of Leeuwarden (West Frisian: Ljouwert), a city with 91,817 inhabitants. Since 2017, Arno Brok is the King's Commissioner in the province. A coalition of the Labour Party, the Christian Democratic Appeal, and the Frisian National Party forms the executive branch. The province is divided into 24 municipalities. The area of the province was once part of the ancient, larger region of Frisia. The official languages of Friesland are West Frisian and Dutch.
1
Routes
139.75
Kilometers
3.08
Hours
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Groningen stad Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Groningen stad", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Groningen (Dutch pronunciation: [ˈɣroːnɪŋə(n)] (listen); Gronings: Grunnen) is the main municipality as well as the capital city of the eponymous province in the Netherlands. It is the largest city in the north of the Netherlands. An old city, Groningen was the regional power of the northern Netherlands, a semi-independent city-state and member of the German Hanseatic League. Groningen is a university city, with an estimated 30,000 students at the University of Groningen, and an estimated 25,000 at the Hanze University of Applied Sciences.
2
Routes
379.16
Kilometers
7.73
Hours
Show region map
Drenthe Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Drenthe", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Drenthe (Dutch pronunciation: [ˈdrɛntə] (listen); German: Drente) is a province of the Netherlands located in the northeastern part of the country. It is bordered by Overijssel to the south, Friesland to the west, Groningen to the north, and Germany (districts of Emsland and Bentheim) to the east. In January 2017, it had a population of 491,867 and a total area of 2,683 km2 (1,036 sq mi). Drenthe has been populated for 150,000 years. The region has subsequently been part of the Episcopal principality of Utrecht, Habsburg Netherlands, Dutch Republic, Batavian Republic, Kingdom of Holland and Kingdom of the Netherlands. Drenthe is an official province since 1796. The capital and seat of the provincial government is Assen. The King's Commissioner of Drenthe is Jetta Klijnsma. The Labour Party (PvdA) is the largest party in the States-Provincial, followed by the People's Party for Freedom and Democracy (VVD) and the Christian Democratic Appeal (CDA). Drenthe is a sparsely populated rural area, unlike many other parts of the Netherlands. Except for some industry in Assen and Emmen, the land in Drenthe is mainly used for agriculture.
3
Routes
485.05
Kilometers
11.72
Hours
Show region map
Lienden Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Lienden", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Lienden is a town in the Dutch province of Gelderland. It is a part of the municipality of Buren, and lies about 9 km south of Veenendaal. Lienden was a separate municipality until 1999, when it was merged with Buren.In 2007, the town of Lienden had 6230 inhabitants. The built-up area of the town was 0.81 km², and contained 1147 residences. The statistical area "Lienden", which also can include the peripheral parts of the village, as well as the surrounding countryside, has a population of around 4200.
1
Routes
139.75
Kilometers
3.08
Hours
Show region map
Bourtange Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Bourtange", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Fort Bourtange (Dutch: Vesting Bourtange) is a fort in the village of Bourtange, Groningen, Netherlands. It was built under orders of William the Silent and completed in 1593. Its original purpose was to control the only road between Germany and the city of Groningen, which was controlled by the Spaniards during the time of the Eighty Years' War. After experiencing its final battle in 1672, the Fort continued to serve in the defensive network on the German border until it was finally given up in 1851 and converted into a village. Fort Bourtange currently serves as a historical museum.
1
Routes
211.52
Kilometers
4.73
Hours
Show region map
Biesbosch Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Biesbosch", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The Biesbosch National Park is one of the largest national parks of the Netherlands and one of the last extensive areas of freshwater tidal wetlands in Northwestern Europe. The Biesbosch ('forest of sedges' or 'rushwoods') consists of a large network of rivers and smaller and larger creeks with islands. The vegetation is mostly willow forests, although wet grasslands and fields of reed are common as well. The Biesbosch is an important wetland area for waterfowl and has a rich flora and fauna. It is especially important for migrating geese.
1
Routes
175.72
Kilometers
3.9
Hours
Show region map
Schouwen Duiveland Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Schouwen Duiveland", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Schouwen-Duiveland (Dutch pronunciation: [ˌsxʌuʋə(n)ˈdœyvəlɑnt] (listen)) is a municipality and an island in the southwestern Netherlands province of Zeeland. The municipality has 33 737 inhabitants (January 1, 2016) and covers an area of 488.94 square kilometres (188.78 square miles) (of which 257.87 square kilometres (99.56 square miles) is water). The northside of the island has two fixed connections to Goeree-Overflakkee, the Brouwersdam and the Grevelingen. The southside has two fixed connections to cross the Oosterschelde to North Beveland, the Stormvloed Kering or Oosterscheldedam, part of the Delta Works and the Zeeland Bridge. The island is mostly flat and is, besides a small area, below the sea level. On the western tip is a dune chose highest point is about 42 meters above sea level. The island is, in the summer, very popular with (German) tourists. The Renesse area is a popular holiday destination for young people. The Brouwersdam is a dam, part of the Delta Works, from Schouwen-Duiveland to Goedereede, the west part of the island of Goeree-Overflakkee in South Holland.
1
Routes
175.72
Kilometers
3.9
Hours
Show region map
Walcheren Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Walcheren", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Walcheren (Dutch pronunciation: [ˈʋɑlxərə(n)] (listen)) is a region and former island in the Dutch province of Zeeland at the mouth of the Scheldt estuary. It lies between the Oosterschelde in the north and the Westerschelde in the south and is roughly the shape of a rhombus. The two sides facing the North Sea consist of dunes; the rest of its coastline is made up of dykes. Middelburg lies at its centre; this city is the provincial capital and Vlissingen 9 kilometres (5.6 mi) to the south is the main harbour. The third municipality is Veere. Originally, Walcheren was an island, but polders and a dam across the Oosterschelde have connected it to the (former) island of Zuid-Beveland, which in turn has been connected to the North Brabant mainland.
1
Routes
140.14
Kilometers
3.75
Hours
Show region map
Utrecht Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Utrecht", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Utrecht (; Dutch pronunciation: [ˈytrɛxt] (listen)) is the fourth-largest city and a municipality of the Netherlands, capital and most populous city of the province of Utrecht. It is located in the eastern corner of the Randstad conurbation and had a population of 345,080 in 2017. Utrecht's ancient city centre features many buildings and structures several dating as far back as the High Middle Ages. It has been the religious centre of the Netherlands since the 8th century. It lost the status of prince-bishopric but remains the main religious centre in the country. Utrecht was the most important city in the Netherlands until the Dutch Golden Age, when it was surpassed by Amsterdam as the country's cultural centre and most populous city. Utrecht is host to Utrecht University, the largest university in the Netherlands, as well as several other institutions of higher education. Due to its central position within the country, it is an important transport hub for both rail and road transport. It has the second highest number of cultural events in the Netherlands, after Amsterdam. In 2012, Lonely Planet included Utrecht in the top 10 of the world’s unsung places.
5
Routes
871.19
Kilometers
19.53
Hours
Show region map
Gelderland Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Gelderland", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Gelderland (Dutch pronunciation: [ˈɣɛldərlɑnt] (listen), also Guelders in English) is a province of the Netherlands, located in the central eastern part of the country. With a land area of nearly 5,000 km2, it is the largest province of the Netherlands and shares borders with six other provinces and Germany. The capital is Arnhem. However, both Nijmegen and Apeldoorn are larger municipalities, Nijmegen being the largest with nearly 170,000 inhabitants. Other major regional centres in Gelderland are Ede, Doetinchem, Zutphen, Tiel, Wageningen, Zevenaar, Winterswijk and Harderwijk. Gelderland had a population of just over two million in 2015.
5
Routes
1806.45
Kilometers
31.25
Hours
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Limburg Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Limburg", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Limburg or Limbourg may refer to:
1
Routes
18.8
Kilometers
3.8
Hours
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nationaal park de loonse en drunense duinen Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "nationaal park de loonse en drunense duinen", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
North Brabant (Dutch: Noord-Brabant; [ˌnoːrd ˈbraːbɑnt] (listen)), also unofficially called Brabant, is a province in the south of the Netherlands. It borders the provinces of South Holland and Gelderland to the north, Limburg to the east, Zeeland to the west, and Belgium to the south. The northern border follows the Meuse westward to its mouth in the Hollands Diep strait, part of the Rhine–Meuse–Scheldt delta.
1
Routes
212.05
Kilometers
4.81
Hours
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Arnhem Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Arnhem", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Arnhem (Dutch pronunciation: [ˈɑrnɛm] (listen) or [ˈɑrnɦɛm] (listen); German: Arnheim; Frisian: Arnhim; South Guelderish: Èrnem) is a city and municipality situated in the eastern part of the Netherlands. It is the capital of the province of Gelderland and located on both banks of the rivers Nederrijn and Sint-Jansbeek, which was the source of the city's development. Arnhem had a population of 156,600 in 2017 and is one of the larger cities of the Netherlands. The municipality is part of the Arnhem-Nijmegen Metropolitan Area which has a combined 736,500 inhabitants.Arnhem is home to the Hogeschool van Arnhem en Nijmegen, ArtEZ Institute of the Arts, Netherlands Open Air Museum, Airborne Museum 'Hartenstein', Royal Burgers' Zoo, NOC*NSF and National Sports Centre Papendal. The north corner of the municipality is part of the Hoge Veluwe National Park. It is approximately 55 square kilometers in area, consisting of heathlands, sand dunes, and woodlands.
1
Routes
211.52
Kilometers
4.73
Hours
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Zoetermeer Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Zoetermeer", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Zoetermeer (Dutch pronunciation: [ˌzutərˈmeːr] (listen)) is a city in the western Netherlands, in the province of South Holland. The municipality covers an area of 37.05 km2 (14.31 sq mi) of which 2.50 km2 (0.97 sq mi) is water. A small village until the late 1960s, it had 6,392 inhabitants in 1950. By 2013 this had grown to 123,328, making it the third largest population centre in the province of South Holland, after Rotterdam and The Hague. It is part of the Haaglanden conurbation. The name Zoetermeer (Dutch for "freshwater lake") refers to the former lake north of the town (reclaimed in 1614). Because the name literally translates as "sweet lake" local residents have dubbed Zoetermeer "Sweet Lake City".
3
Routes
485.05
Kilometers
11.72
Hours
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Betuwe Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Betuwe", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Batavia (; Dutch: Betuwe, Dutch: [ˈbeːtyʋə] (listen)) is an historical and geographical region in the Netherlands, forming large fertile islands in the river delta formed by the waters of the Rhine (Dutch: Rijn) and Meuse (Dutch: Maas) river. During the Roman empire, it was an important frontier region and source of imperial soldiers. Its name is possibly pre-Roman. Administratively, the modern version, Betuwe, is a part of the modern province of Gelderland and although the rivers and provinces have changed over history it is roughly the same. Today it has the Waal river on the south and the Lek and Nederrijn in the north (all rivers which start in the delta itself and are branches of the Rhine or Maas. Historically, the former municipality of Rijnwaarden belonged to Betuwe, now in Zevenaar, which was cut-off by the building of the Pannerdens Kanaal. A major freight railroad, the Betuweroute, passes through the Betuwe. It was opened in 2007 after many years of controversy. The Betuwe region is divided into 11 municipalities: Overbetuwe, Neder-Betuwe, Lingewaard, Arnhem (southern part), Nijmegen (northern part), Tiel, Culemborg, Neerijnen, Geldermalsen, Lingewaal and Buren.
1
Routes
433.54
Kilometers
8.61
Hours
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Voerstreek Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Voerstreek", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Voeren (Dutch pronunciation: [ˈvuːrə(n)]; French: Fourons) is a Flemish municipality located in the Belgian province of Limburg. Bordering the Netherlands to the north and the Walloon province of Liège (Dutch: Luik) to the south, it is geographically detached from the rest of Flanders, making Voeren an exclave of Flanders. Voeren's name is derived from that of a small right-bank tributary of the Meuse, the Voer, which flows through the municipality. The current municipality of Voeren was established by the municipal reform of 1977. On 1 January 2008, Voeren had a total population of 4,207. Its total area is 50.63 km2 (19.55 sq mi), giving a population density of 83 inhabitants per square kilometre (210/sq mi). About 25% of the population is made up of foreign nationals, most of whom have Dutch nationality.
1
Routes
212.05
Kilometers
4.81
Hours
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Nijmegen Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Nijmegen", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Nijmegen (Dutch pronunciation: [ˈnɛimeːɣə(n)] (listen); Nijmeegs: Nimwegen [ˈnɪmβ̞ɛːxə]) is a city in the Dutch province of Gelderland, on the Waal river close to the German border. Nijmegen is the oldest city in the Netherlands, the first to be recognized as such in Roman times, and in 2005 celebrated 2,000 years of existence. The municipality is part of the Arnhem-Nijmegen urban region, a metropolitan area with 736,107 inhabitants in 2011.
2
Routes
454.4
Kilometers
8.47
Hours
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Flevoland Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Flevoland", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Flevoland (Dutch pronunciation: [ˈfleːvoːlɑnt] (listen)) is the twelfth and last province of the Netherlands, established on 1 January 1986, when the southern and eastern Flevopolders were merged into one provincial entity. It is located in the centre of the country, where the former Zuiderzee was. Almost all of the land belonging to Flevoland was reclaimed only in the 1950s and 1960s. The province has about 407,905 inhabitants (2016) and consists of 6 municipalities. Its capital is Lelystad and most populous city Almere.
1
Routes
192.81
Kilometers
5.02
Hours
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Valkenburg Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Valkenburg", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Valkenburg means falcon castle in Dutch and can refer to: Valkenburg (city), a city in the municipality of Valkenburg aan de Geul Valkenburg Castle, ruined castle near Valkenburg city Valkenburg aan de Geul, a municipality in the province of Limburg Valkenburg, South Holland, a village in the municipality of Katwijk in the province of South Holland Valkenburg Naval Air Base, a former Royal Netherlands Navy air base Valkenburg (surname), a Dutch surname
1
Routes
219.23
Kilometers
4.55
Hours
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Zwolle Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Zwolle", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Zwolle (Dutch: [ˈzʋɔlə] (listen)) is a city and municipality in the northeastern Netherlands serving as Overijssel's capital. With a population of 125,806, it is the second-largest municipality of the province after Enschede.
1
Routes
139.75
Kilometers
3.08
Hours
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Slochteren Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Slochteren", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Slochteren (Dutch pronunciation: [ˈslɔxtərə(n)] (listen)) is a village and former municipality with a population of 15,546 in the province of Groningen in the northeast of the Netherlands. On January 1, 2018, Slochteren merged with Hoogezand-Sappemeer and Menterwolde, forming the municipality Midden-Groningen. The former municipality can be characterized as a chain of small villages dividing a mostly agricultural landscape. Having an agricultural background for at least a thousand years, the community houses for the most part commuters to nearby towns like Hoogezand, Groningen and Delfzijl. The mansion Fraeylemaborg (a small 'castle', the oldest parts of which are dated in the Middle Ages) is located in Slochteren.
5
Routes
924.14
Kilometers
19.1
Hours
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Friesland Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Friesland", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Friesland (Dutch pronunciation: [ˈfrislɑnt] (listen); official, West Frisian: Fryslân [ˈfrislɔːn] (listen)), also historically known as Frisia, is a province of the Netherlands located in the northern part of the country. It is situated west of Groningen, northwest of Drenthe and Overijssel, north of Flevoland, northeast of North Holland, and south of the Wadden Sea. In 2015, the province had a population of 646,092 and a total area of 5,100 km2 (2,000 sq mi). The capital and seat of the provincial government is the city of Leeuwarden (West Frisian: Ljouwert), a city with 91,817 inhabitants. Since 2017, Arno Brok is the King's Commissioner in the province. A coalition of the Labour Party, the Christian Democratic Appeal, and the Frisian National Party forms the executive branch. The province is divided into 24 municipalities. The area of the province was once part of the ancient, larger region of Frisia. The official languages of Friesland are West Frisian and Dutch.
2
Routes
305.73
Kilometers
7.16
Hours
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kempen Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "kempen", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Kempen may refer to: Kempen, Germany, a town in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany; German name of the Polish town of Kępno, part of the former Prussian district Kreis Kempen A region in Belgium and the Netherlands, also called Kempenland or Campine in English
Rondje het mooie zuiden van Drenthe
17-10-2016
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Dwars door Groningen 140 km
26-10-2017
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Rondje door Friesland
20-01-2016
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Ruim Rondje Veluwe
18-01-2016
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NL ZH Zoetermeer Gouderak Alblasserwaard Biesbos Lekdijk 200km 5u
23-04-2017
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Een ander rondje Noord Holland
03-04-2016
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Rondje Utrechtse Heuvelrug
21-01-2016
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Overijssel in vogelvlucht 220 km
24-10-2017
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Strijd Tegen Water Route Zeeland
15-01-2016
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Wandeling Austerlitz
23-02-2017
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