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The prettiest verified routes in Austria

MyRoute-app helps you with planning your dream journey! All routes on the page have been verified by our RouteXperts. De routes are categorized in regions, when you click on 'view region' you will see all verified routes for that region that are free to use.
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35
Amount of active RouteXperts (worldwide)
404
Amount of routes reviewd by RouteXperts (worldwide)
3087
Amount of downloaded routes (worldwide)
1436
Amount of visits (Austria)
9
Amount of routes verified by RouteXperts (Austria)
30
Amount of downloaded routes (Austria)
5
Routes
1701.47
Kilometers
34.4
Hours
Show region map
Karinthie Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Karinthie", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Otto III (c. 1265 – 25 May 1310), a member of the House of Gorizia (Meinhardiner dynasty), was Duke of Carinthia and Count of Tyrol from 1295 until his death. He ruled jointly with his younger brothers Louis and Henry VI.
1
Routes
295.43
Kilometers
5.32
Hours
Show region map
vorarlberg Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "vorarlberg", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Vorarlberg (German pronunciation: [ˈfoːɐ̯ʔaʁlbɛʁk]) is the westernmost federal state (Bundesland) of Austria. It has the second-smallest area after Vienna, and although it has the second-smallest population, it also has the second-highest population density (also after Vienna). It borders three countries: Germany (Bavaria and Baden-Württemberg via Lake Constance), Switzerland (Grisons and St. Gallen) and Liechtenstein (Balzers, Eschen, Mauren, Planken, Ruggell, Schaan, Schellenberg and Triesenberg). The only Austrian state that shares a border with Vorarlberg is Tyrol to the east. The capital of Vorarlberg is Bregenz (29,806 inhabitants), although Dornbirn (49,278 inhabitants) and Feldkirch (33,420 inhabitants) have larger populations. Vorarlberg is also the only state in Austria where the local dialect is not Austro-Bavarian, but rather an Alemannic dialect; it therefore has much more in common culturally with its (historically) Alemannic-speaking German-speaking Switzerland, Liechtenstein, Swabia and Alsace than with rest of Austria, southeastern Bavaria, and South Tyrol. Vorarlberg is almost completely mountainous and has been nicknamed the ‘Ländle’ meaning ‘small land’.
1
Routes
200.08
Kilometers
4.25
Hours
Show region map
Salzburgerland Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Salzburgerland", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Salzburg (German pronunciation: [ˈzaltsbʊɐ̯k] (listen); literally "Salt Fortress") is a state (Land) of Austria. It is officially named Land Salzburg, colloquially Salzburgerland, to distinguish it from its eponymous capital Salzburg city and as such is the only state to be named after its capital. By its centuries-long history as an independent Prince-Bishopric, Salzburg's tradition differs from the other Austrian lands.
3
Routes
1155.86
Kilometers
22.38
Hours
Show region map
Friuli Venezia Giulia Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Friuli Venezia Giulia", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Friuli–Venezia Giulia (pronounced [friˈuːli veˈnɛttsja ˈdʒuːlja]) is one of the 20 regions of Italy, and one of five autonomous regions with special statute. The regional capital is Trieste. The city of Venice (Venezia) is not in this region, despite the name. Friuli–Venezia Giulia has an area of 7,924 km2 and about 1.2 million inhabitants. A natural opening to the sea for many Central European countries, the region is traversed by the major transport routes between the east and west of southern Europe. It encompasses the historical-geographical region of Friuli and a small portion of the historical region of Venezia Giulia – also known in English as the Julian March – each with its own distinct history, traditions and identity.
3
Routes
1155.86
Kilometers
22.38
Hours
Show region map
Friuli Venezia Giulia Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Friuli Venezia Giulia", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Friuli–Venezia Giulia (pronounced [friˈuːli veˈnɛttsja ˈdʒuːlja]) is one of the 20 regions of Italy, and one of five autonomous regions with special statute. The regional capital is Trieste. The city of Venice (Venezia) is not in this region, despite the name. Friuli–Venezia Giulia has an area of 7,924 km2 and about 1.2 million inhabitants. A natural opening to the sea for many Central European countries, the region is traversed by the major transport routes between the east and west of southern Europe. It encompasses the historical-geographical region of Friuli and a small portion of the historical region of Venezia Giulia – also known in English as the Julian March – each with its own distinct history, traditions and identity.
4
Routes
1501.39
Kilometers
30.15
Hours
Show region map
Slovenia Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Slovenia", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Slovenia ( (listen) sloh-VEE-nee-ə; Slovene: Slovenija [slɔˈʋèːnija]), officially the Republic of Slovenia (Slovene: Republika Slovenija , abbr.: RS), is a sovereign state located in southern Central Europe at a crossroads of important European cultural and trade routes. It is bordered by Italy to the west, Austria to the north, Hungary to the northeast, Croatia to the southeast, and the Adriatic Sea to the southwest. It covers 20,273 square kilometers (7,827 sq mi) and has a population of 2.07 million. One of the successor states of the former Yugoslavia, Slovenia is a parliamentary republic and a member of the United Nations, of the European Union, and of NATO. The capital and largest city is Ljubljana.Slovenia has a mostly mountainous terrain with a mainly continental climate, with the exception of the Slovene Littoral, which has a sub-Mediterranean climate, and of the northwest, which has an Alpine climate. Additionally, the Dinaric Alps and the Pannonian Plain meet on the territory of Slovenia. The country, marked by a significant biological diversity, is one of the most water-rich in Europe, with a dense river network, a rich aquifer system, and significant karst underground watercourses. Over half of the territory is covered by forest. The human settlement of Slovenia is dispersed and uneven.Slovenia has historically been the crossroads of Slavic, Germanic, and Romance languages and cultures. Although the population is not homogeneous, Slovenes comprise the majority. The South Slavic language Slovene is the official language throughout the country. Slovenia is a largely secularized country, but Catholicism and Lutheranism have significantly influenced its culture and identity. The economy of Slovenia is small, open and export-oriented and has been strongly influenced by international conditions. It has been severely hurt by the Eurozone crisis which started in 2009. The main economic field is services, followed by industry and construction.Historically, the current territory of Slovenia has formed part of many different states, including the Roman Empire, Byzantine Empire, Carolingian Empire and the Holy Roman Empire, the Habsburg Monarchy, the Republic of Venice, the French-administered Illyrian Provinces of Napoleon I, the Austrian Empire and Austria-Hungary. In October 1918 the Slovenes exercised self-determination for the first time by co-founding the State of Slovenes, Croats and Serbs. In December 1918 they merged with the Kingdom of Serbia into the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes (renamed Kingdom of Yugoslavia in 1929). During World War II (1939–1945) Germany, Italy, and Hungary occupied and annexed Slovenia (1941–1945), with a tiny area transferred to the Independent State of Croatia, a Nazi puppet state. In 1945 Slovenia became a founding member of the Federal People's Republic of Yugoslavia, renamed in 1963 as the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. In the first years after World War II this state was initially allied with the Eastern Bloc, but it never subscribed to the Warsaw Pact and in 1961 became one of the founders of the Non-Aligned Movement. In June 1991, after the introduction of multi-party representative democracy, Slovenia split from Yugoslavia and became an independent country. In 2004, it entered NATO and the European Union; in 2007 became the first formerly communist country to join the Eurozone; and in 2010 it joined the OECD, a global association of high-income developed countries.
2
Routes
602.49
Kilometers
11.27
Hours
Show region map
Zuid Tirol Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Zuid Tirol", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Below is list of Dutch language exonyms for places in non-Dutch-speaking areas of Europe
2
Routes
602.49
Kilometers
11.27
Hours
Show region map
Alto Adige Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Alto Adige", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
South Tyrol is an autonomous province in northern Italy. It is one of the two autonomous provinces that make up the autonomous region of Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol. Its official trilingual denomination is Autonome Provinz Bozen – Südtirol in German, Provincia autonoma di Bolzano – Alto Adige in Italian and Provinzia autonoma de Bulsan – Südtirol in Ladin, reflecting the three main language groups to which its population belongs. The province is the northernmost of Italy, the second largest, with an area of 7,400 square kilometres (2,857 sq mi) and has a total population of 530,009 inhabitants as of 2018. Its capital and largest city is Bolzano (German: Bozen; Ladin: Balsan or Bulsan). According to 2014 data based on the 2011 census, 62.3% of the population speaks German (Standard German in the written form and an Austro-Bavarian dialect in the spoken form); 23.4% of the population speaks Italian, mainly in and around the two largest cities (Bolzano and Merano); 4.1% speaks Ladin, a Rhaeto-Romance language; 10.2% of the population (mainly recent immigrants) speaks another language as first language. The province is granted a considerable level of self-government, consisting of a large range of exclusive legislative and executive powers and a fiscal regime that allows it to retain a large part of most levied taxes, while remaining a net contributor to the national budget. As of 2016, South Tyrol is the wealthiest province in Italy and among the wealthiest in the European Union. In the wider context of the European Union, the province is one of the three members of the Euroregion of Tyrol-South Tyrol-Trentino, which corresponds almost exactly to the historical region of Tyrol. The other members are Tyrol state in Austria, to the north and east, and the Italian Autonomous province of Trento to the South.
2
Routes
602.49
Kilometers
11.27
Hours
Show region map
Trentino Sudtirol Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Trentino Sudtirol", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol (Italian: Trentino-Alto Adige, pronounced [trenˈtiːno ˈalto ˈaːdidʒe]; German: Trentino-Südtirol; Ladin: Trentin-Südtirol) is an autonomous region in Northern Italy. Since the 1970s, most legislative and administrative powers have been transferred to the two self-governing provinces that make up the region: the Province of Trento, commonly known as Trentino, and the Province of Bolzano, commonly known as South Tyrol. From the 9th century until its annexation by Italy in 1919, the region was part of Austria-Hungary and its predecessors, the Austrian Empire and the Holy Roman Empire. Together with the Austrian state of Tyrol it is represented by the Euroregion Tyrol-South Tyrol-Trentino. With a past of poverty, the region is today among the wealthiest and most developed in both Italy and the whole European Union. In English, the region is also known as Trentino-South Tyrol or by its Italian name.
1
Routes
212.46
Kilometers
4.22
Hours
Show region map
Achensee Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Achensee", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Lake Achen (German: Achensee) is a lake north of Jenbach in Tyrol, Austria. It is the largest lake within the federal state, and has a maximal depth of 133 metres. Together with the Achen Valley it parts the Karwendel mountain range in the west from the Brandenberg Alps in the east. Water quality is near drinking water, with sight up to 10 m below the surface. An alpine lake, water temperature is accordingly low, rarely above 20 °C. Its size and wind conditions make it suitable for windsurfing. Eben am Achensee, Achenkirch, and Pertisau are municipalities on the lake.
4
Routes
1110.38
Kilometers
20.81
Hours
Show region map
Tirol Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Tirol", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Tyrol (; historically the Tyrole; German: Tirol [tiˈʁoːl] (listen); Italian: Tirolo) is a historical region in the Alps; in northern Italy and western Austria. The area was to Habsburg times the former County of Tyrol. The Treaty of Saint-Germain-en-Laye in 1919 divided the area into two parts: State of Tyrol; formed by North and East Tyrol, it belongs to the Republic of Austria Region of Trentino-South Tyrol; at that time still with Souramont (Cortina d'Ampezzo, Livinallongo del Col di Lana and Colle Santa Lucia) and the municipalities Valvestino, Magasa and Pedemonte, belonged to the Kingdom of Italy, since 1946 the Italian Republic.With the founding of the European region Tyrol-South Tyrol-Trentino the area has its own legal entity since 2011 in the form of a European Grouping for Territorial Cooperation.
5
Routes
1701.47
Kilometers
34.4
Hours
Show region map
karinthie Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "karinthie", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Otto III (c. 1265 – 25 May 1310), a member of the House of Gorizia (Meinhardiner dynasty), was Duke of Carinthia and Count of Tyrol from 1295 until his death. He ruled jointly with his younger brothers Louis and Henry VI.
1
Routes
544.63
Kilometers
9.25
Hours
Show region map
VENETO Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "VENETO", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Veneto ( or ; Italian: Veneto [ˈvɛːneto]; Venetian: Vèneto [ˈvɛneto]) is one of the 20 regions of Italy. Its population is about five million, ranking fifth in Italy. The region's capital and most populous city is Venice. Veneto was part of the Roman Empire until the 5th century AD. Later, after a feudal period, it was part of the Republic of Venice until 1797. Venice ruled for centuries over one of the largest and richest maritime republics and trade empires in the world. After the Napoleonic Wars and the Congress of Vienna, the Republic was annexed by the Austrian Empire, until it was merged with the Kingdom of Italy in 1866, as a result of the Third Italian War of Independence. Besides Italian, most inhabitants also speak Venetian, which is divided into five varieties. Since 1971 the Statute of Veneto has referred to the region's citizens as "the Venetian people". Article 1 defines Veneto as an "autonomous Region", "constituted by the Venetian people and the lands of the provinces of Belluno, Padua, Rovigo, Treviso, Venice, Verona and Vicenza", while maintaining "bonds with Venetians in the world". Article 2 sets forth the principle of the "self-government of the Venetian people" and mandates the Region to "promote the historical identity of the Venetian people and civilisation". Despite this affirmations, approved by the Italian Parliament, Veneto is not among the autonomous regions with special statute, differently from its north-eastern and north-western neighbours, Friuli-Venezia Giulia and Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol respectively. Veneto is home to a notable nationalist movement, known as Venetian nationalism or Venetism. The region's largest party is the Liga Veneta, a founding component of the Lega Nord. The current President of Veneto is Luca Zaia (Liga Veneta–Lega Nord), re-elected in 2015 with 50.1% of the vote. Zaia II Government includes also Forza Italia and is externally supported by Independence We Veneto and the Brothers of Italy. An autonomy referendum took place in 2017: 57.2% of Venetians turned out, 98.1% voting "yes" to "further forms and special conditions of autonomy". Having been for a long period in history a land of mass emigration, Veneto is today one of the greatest immigrant-receiving regions in the country, with 487,493 foreigners (9.9% of the regional population; January 2018), notably including Romanians (25.2%), Moroccans (9.3%), Chinese (7.1%), Moldovans (7.0%) and Albanians (6.9%).
1
Routes
544.63
Kilometers
9.25
Hours
Show region map
VENETO Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "VENETO", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Veneto ( or ; Italian: Veneto [ˈvɛːneto]; Venetian: Vèneto [ˈvɛneto]) is one of the 20 regions of Italy. Its population is about five million, ranking fifth in Italy. The region's capital and most populous city is Venice. Veneto was part of the Roman Empire until the 5th century AD. Later, after a feudal period, it was part of the Republic of Venice until 1797. Venice ruled for centuries over one of the largest and richest maritime republics and trade empires in the world. After the Napoleonic Wars and the Congress of Vienna, the Republic was annexed by the Austrian Empire, until it was merged with the Kingdom of Italy in 1866, as a result of the Third Italian War of Independence. Besides Italian, most inhabitants also speak Venetian, which is divided into five varieties. Since 1971 the Statute of Veneto has referred to the region's citizens as "the Venetian people". Article 1 defines Veneto as an "autonomous Region", "constituted by the Venetian people and the lands of the provinces of Belluno, Padua, Rovigo, Treviso, Venice, Verona and Vicenza", while maintaining "bonds with Venetians in the world". Article 2 sets forth the principle of the "self-government of the Venetian people" and mandates the Region to "promote the historical identity of the Venetian people and civilisation". Despite this affirmations, approved by the Italian Parliament, Veneto is not among the autonomous regions with special statute, differently from its north-eastern and north-western neighbours, Friuli-Venezia Giulia and Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol respectively. Veneto is home to a notable nationalist movement, known as Venetian nationalism or Venetism. The region's largest party is the Liga Veneta, a founding component of the Lega Nord. The current President of Veneto is Luca Zaia (Liga Veneta–Lega Nord), re-elected in 2015 with 50.1% of the vote. Zaia II Government includes also Forza Italia and is externally supported by Independence We Veneto and the Brothers of Italy. An autonomy referendum took place in 2017: 57.2% of Venetians turned out, 98.1% voting "yes" to "further forms and special conditions of autonomy". Having been for a long period in history a land of mass emigration, Veneto is today one of the greatest immigrant-receiving regions in the country, with 487,493 foreigners (9.9% of the regional population; January 2018), notably including Romanians (25.2%), Moroccans (9.3%), Chinese (7.1%), Moldovans (7.0%) and Albanians (6.9%).
1
Routes
544.63
Kilometers
9.25
Hours
Show region map
VENETO Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "VENETO", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Veneto ( or ; Italian: Veneto [ˈvɛːneto]; Venetian: Vèneto [ˈvɛneto]) is one of the 20 regions of Italy. Its population is about five million, ranking fifth in Italy. The region's capital and most populous city is Venice. Veneto was part of the Roman Empire until the 5th century AD. Later, after a feudal period, it was part of the Republic of Venice until 1797. Venice ruled for centuries over one of the largest and richest maritime republics and trade empires in the world. After the Napoleonic Wars and the Congress of Vienna, the Republic was annexed by the Austrian Empire, until it was merged with the Kingdom of Italy in 1866, as a result of the Third Italian War of Independence. Besides Italian, most inhabitants also speak Venetian, which is divided into five varieties. Since 1971 the Statute of Veneto has referred to the region's citizens as "the Venetian people". Article 1 defines Veneto as an "autonomous Region", "constituted by the Venetian people and the lands of the provinces of Belluno, Padua, Rovigo, Treviso, Venice, Verona and Vicenza", while maintaining "bonds with Venetians in the world". Article 2 sets forth the principle of the "self-government of the Venetian people" and mandates the Region to "promote the historical identity of the Venetian people and civilisation". Despite this affirmations, approved by the Italian Parliament, Veneto is not among the autonomous regions with special statute, differently from its north-eastern and north-western neighbours, Friuli-Venezia Giulia and Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol respectively. Veneto is home to a notable nationalist movement, known as Venetian nationalism or Venetism. The region's largest party is the Liga Veneta, a founding component of the Lega Nord. The current President of Veneto is Luca Zaia (Liga Veneta–Lega Nord), re-elected in 2015 with 50.1% of the vote. Zaia II Government includes also Forza Italia and is externally supported by Independence We Veneto and the Brothers of Italy. An autonomy referendum took place in 2017: 57.2% of Venetians turned out, 98.1% voting "yes" to "further forms and special conditions of autonomy". Having been for a long period in history a land of mass emigration, Veneto is today one of the greatest immigrant-receiving regions in the country, with 487,493 foreigners (9.9% of the regional population; January 2018), notably including Romanians (25.2%), Moroccans (9.3%), Chinese (7.1%), Moldovans (7.0%) and Albanians (6.9%).
3
Routes
1155.86
Kilometers
22.38
Hours
Show region map
FRIULI VENEZIA GIULIA Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "FRIULI VENEZIA GIULIA", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Friuli–Venezia Giulia (pronounced [friˈuːli veˈnɛttsja ˈdʒuːlja]) is one of the 20 regions of Italy, and one of five autonomous regions with special statute. The regional capital is Trieste. The city of Venice (Venezia) is not in this region, despite the name. Friuli–Venezia Giulia has an area of 7,924 km2 and about 1.2 million inhabitants. A natural opening to the sea for many Central European countries, the region is traversed by the major transport routes between the east and west of southern Europe. It encompasses the historical-geographical region of Friuli and a small portion of the historical region of Venezia Giulia – also known in English as the Julian March – each with its own distinct history, traditions and identity.
4
Routes
1501.39
Kilometers
30.15
Hours
Show region map
SLOVENIA Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "SLOVENIA", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Slovenia ( (listen) sloh-VEE-nee-ə; Slovene: Slovenija [slɔˈʋèːnija]), officially the Republic of Slovenia (Slovene: Republika Slovenija , abbr.: RS), is a sovereign state located in southern Central Europe at a crossroads of important European cultural and trade routes. It is bordered by Italy to the west, Austria to the north, Hungary to the northeast, Croatia to the southeast, and the Adriatic Sea to the southwest. It covers 20,273 square kilometers (7,827 sq mi) and has a population of 2.07 million. One of the successor states of the former Yugoslavia, Slovenia is a parliamentary republic and a member of the United Nations, of the European Union, and of NATO. The capital and largest city is Ljubljana.Slovenia has a mostly mountainous terrain with a mainly continental climate, with the exception of the Slovene Littoral, which has a sub-Mediterranean climate, and of the northwest, which has an Alpine climate. Additionally, the Dinaric Alps and the Pannonian Plain meet on the territory of Slovenia. The country, marked by a significant biological diversity, is one of the most water-rich in Europe, with a dense river network, a rich aquifer system, and significant karst underground watercourses. Over half of the territory is covered by forest. The human settlement of Slovenia is dispersed and uneven.Slovenia has historically been the crossroads of Slavic, Germanic, and Romance languages and cultures. Although the population is not homogeneous, Slovenes comprise the majority. The South Slavic language Slovene is the official language throughout the country. Slovenia is a largely secularized country, but Catholicism and Lutheranism have significantly influenced its culture and identity. The economy of Slovenia is small, open and export-oriented and has been strongly influenced by international conditions. It has been severely hurt by the Eurozone crisis which started in 2009. The main economic field is services, followed by industry and construction.Historically, the current territory of Slovenia has formed part of many different states, including the Roman Empire, Byzantine Empire, Carolingian Empire and the Holy Roman Empire, the Habsburg Monarchy, the Republic of Venice, the French-administered Illyrian Provinces of Napoleon I, the Austrian Empire and Austria-Hungary. In October 1918 the Slovenes exercised self-determination for the first time by co-founding the State of Slovenes, Croats and Serbs. In December 1918 they merged with the Kingdom of Serbia into the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes (renamed Kingdom of Yugoslavia in 1929). During World War II (1939–1945) Germany, Italy, and Hungary occupied and annexed Slovenia (1941–1945), with a tiny area transferred to the Independent State of Croatia, a Nazi puppet state. In 1945 Slovenia became a founding member of the Federal People's Republic of Yugoslavia, renamed in 1963 as the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. In the first years after World War II this state was initially allied with the Eastern Bloc, but it never subscribed to the Warsaw Pact and in 1961 became one of the founders of the Non-Aligned Movement. In June 1991, after the introduction of multi-party representative democracy, Slovenia split from Yugoslavia and became an independent country. In 2004, it entered NATO and the European Union; in 2007 became the first formerly communist country to join the Eurozone; and in 2010 it joined the OECD, a global association of high-income developed countries.
9
Routes
2811.85
Kilometers
55.21
Hours
Show region map
AUSTRIA Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "AUSTRIA", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Austria ( (listen), ; German: Österreich [ˈøːstɐraɪç] (listen)), officially the Republic of Austria (German: Republik Österreich, listen ), is a country of nearly 9 million people in Central Europe. It is bordered by the Czech Republic and Germany to the north, Hungary and Slovakia to the east, Slovenia and Italy to the south, and Switzerland and Liechtenstein to the west. The territory of Austria covers 83,879 km2 (32,386 sq mi). The terrain is highly mountainous, lying within the Alps; only 32% of the country is below 500 m (1,640 ft), and its highest point is 3,798 m (12,461 ft). The majority of the population speaks local Bavarian dialects as their native language, and German in its standard form is the country's official language. Other local official languages are Hungarian, Burgenland Croatian, and Slovene.Austria is a federal republic with a parliamentary representative democracy comprising nine federated states. The capital and largest city, with a population exceeding 1.8 million, is Vienna. Other major urban areas of Austria include Graz, Linz, Salzburg and Innsbruck. Austria is consistently ranked as one of the richest countries in the world by per capita GDP terms. The country has developed a high standard of living and in 2018 was ranked 20th in the world for its Human Development Index. The republic declared its perpetual neutrality in foreign political affairs in 1955. Austria has been a member of the United Nations since 1955, joined the European Union in 1995, and is a founder of the OECD. Austria also signed the Schengen Agreement in 1995, and adopted the euro currency in 1999.
1
Routes
209.44
Kilometers
4.05
Hours
Show region map
Nauders Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Nauders", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Nauders (Romansh: Danuder) is a municipality in the district of Landeck in the Austrian state of Tyrol.
1
Routes
209.44
Kilometers
4.05
Hours
Show region map
Graun Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Graun", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Graun may refer to: Graun im Vinschgau (Curon Venosta), a municipality in Italy Carl Heinrich Graun (1704–1759), a German composer Johann Gottlieb Graun (1703–1771), a German composer and violinist The Guardian, a UK newspaper
2
Routes
688.48
Kilometers
12.54
Hours
Show region map
Beieren Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Beieren", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Jacqueline (Dutch: Jacoba van Beieren; French: Jacqueline de Bavière; 15 July 1401 – 8 October 1436), was a Duchess of Bavaria-Straubing, Countess of Holland and Zeeland and Countess of Hainaut from 1417 to 1433. She was also Dauphine of France for a short time between 1415 and 1417 and Duchess of Gloucester in the 1420s, if her marriage to Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester, is accepted as valid. Born in The Hague, Jacqueline, from her birth, was referred to as "of Holland", indicating that she was the heiress of her father's estates. Jacqueline was the last Wittelsbach ruler of Hainaut and Holland. Following her death, her estates passed into the inheritance of Philip the Good, Duke of Burgundy.
2
Routes
688.48
Kilometers
12.54
Hours
Show region map
Beieren Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Beieren", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Jacqueline (Dutch: Jacoba van Beieren; French: Jacqueline de Bavière; 15 July 1401 – 8 October 1436), was a Duchess of Bavaria-Straubing, Countess of Holland and Zeeland and Countess of Hainaut from 1417 to 1433. She was also Dauphine of France for a short time between 1415 and 1417 and Duchess of Gloucester in the 1420s, if her marriage to Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester, is accepted as valid. Born in The Hague, Jacqueline, from her birth, was referred to as "of Holland", indicating that she was the heiress of her father's estates. Jacqueline was the last Wittelsbach ruler of Hainaut and Holland. Following her death, her estates passed into the inheritance of Philip the Good, Duke of Burgundy.
Il Passo Pramollo
03-02-2019
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Sankt Margarethen im Lungau Nockalmstrasse Milstatter See Maltatal Katschberg and back
26-11-2018
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Nauders Livigno Stelvio
16-02-2019
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rondrit Allgau Bregenzerwald
17-02-2019
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Winklern door Aut-Svn-Ita naar Kötschach
31-01-2019
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Nesselwang Garda meer
03-02-2019
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De Nassfeldpass Italie Slovenie
19-01-2019
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Van Pasjak naar Faaker See
05-01-2019
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Achenkirch Hohe Tauern
27-01-2019
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