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The prettiest verified routes in Switzerland

 
MyRoute-app helps you with planning your dream journey! All routes on the page have been verified by our RouteXperts. De routes are categorized in regions, when you click on 'view region' you will see all verified routes for that region that are free to use.
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37
Amount of active RouteXperts (worldwide)
671
Amount of routes reviewed by RouteXperts (worldwide)
12667
Amount of downloaded routes (worldwide)
7057
Amount of visits (Switzerland)
15
Amount of routes verified by RouteXperts (Switzerland)
77
Amount of downloaded routes (Switzerland)
3
Routes
725.15
Kilometers
14.13
Hours
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Baden Wurttemberg Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Baden Wurttemberg", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Baden-Württemberg (, German: [ˌbaːdn̩ ˈvʏɐ̯təmbɛɐ̯k] (listen)) is a state in southwest Germany, east of the Rhine, which forms the border with France. It is Germany’s third-largest state, with an area of 35,751 km2 (13,804 sq mi) and 11 million inhabitants. Baden-Württemberg is a parliamentary republic and partly sovereign, federated state which was formed in 1952 by a merger of the states of Württemberg-Baden, Baden and Württemberg-Hohenzollern. The largest city in Baden-Württemberg is the state capital of Stuttgart, followed by Karlsruhe and Mannheim. Other cities are Freiburg im Breisgau, Heidelberg, Heilbronn, Pforzheim, Reutlingen and Ulm. The sobriquet Ländle ("little province" in the local Swabian and Alemannic German dialects) is sometimes used as a synonym for Baden-Württemberg.
1
Routes
331.23
Kilometers
7.21
Hours
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Auvergne Rhone Alpes Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Auvergne Rhone Alpes", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes or ARA (French pronunciation: [ovɛʁɲ ʁon alp] (listen), Arpitan: Ôvèrgne-Rôno-Ârpes, Occitan: Auvèrnhe Ròse Aups, Italian: Alvernia-Rodano-Alpi) is a region in southeast-central France created by the territorial reform of French Regions in 2015; it resulted from the merger of Auvergne and Rhône-Alpes. The new region came into effect on 1 January 2016, after the regional elections in December 2015.The region covers an area of more than 69,711 km2 (26,916 sq mi), making it the third largest in metropolitan France, with a population of 7,877,698, second only to Île-de-France. It consists of 12 departments and one territorial collectivity. Lyon is the chef-lieu of the region. This new region combines diverse geographical, sociological, economic, and cultural regions, which was already true of Rhône-Alpes, as well as Auvergne, to a lesser extent. While the old Rhône-Alpes and Auvergne regions each enjoyed a unity defined by axes of communication and the pull of their repective metropoles, the new combination is heterogeneous, and sustained lively opposition from some local officials after its creation..
1
Routes
420.24
Kilometers
8.58
Hours
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Bourgogne Franche Comte Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Bourgogne Franche Comte", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Bourgogne-Franche-Comté (French pronunciation: ​[buʁɡɔɲ fʁɑ̃ʃ kɔ̃te], sometimes abbreviated BFC; meaning Burgundy–Free County) is a region in the east of France created by the territorial reform of French Regions in 2014, from a merger of Burgundy and Franche-Comté. The new region came into existence on 1 January 2016, after the regional elections of December 2015, electing 100 members to the regional council of Bourgogne-Franche-Comté.The region covers an area of 47,784 km2 (18,450 sq mi), and has a population of 2,816,814.
1
Routes
278.54
Kilometers
6.53
Hours
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Zurich Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Zurich", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Zürich or Zurich ( ZEWR-ik; see below for other names) is the largest city in Switzerland and the capital of the canton of Zürich. It is located in north-central Switzerland at the northwestern tip of Lake Zürich. The municipality has approximately 409,000 inhabitants, the urban agglomeration 1.315 million and the Zürich metropolitan area 1.83 million. Zürich is a hub for railways, roads, and air traffic. Both Zurich Airport and railway station are the largest and busiest in the country. Permanently settled for over 2,000 years, Zürich was founded by the Romans, who, in 15 BC, called it Turicum. However, early settlements have been found dating back more than 6,400 years ago. During the Middle Ages, Zürich gained the independent and privileged status of imperial immediacy and, in 1519, became a primary centre of the Protestant Reformation in Europe under the leadership of Huldrych Zwingli.The official language of Zürich is German, but the main spoken language is the local variant of the Alemannic Swiss German dialect, Zürich German. Many museums and art galleries can be found in the city, including the Swiss National Museum, the Kunsthaus and newer Theater 11 in Oerlikon. Schauspielhaus Zürich is one of the most important theatres in the German-speaking world.Zürich is a leading global city and among the world's largest financial centres despite having a relatively small population. The city is home to a large number of financial institutions and banking companies. Many of Switzerland's research and development centres are concentrated in the Greater Zürich area and the low tax rates and canton funding subsidies attract overseas companies to set up their headquarters or finance treasury services in the city.Monocle's 2012 "Quality of Life Survey" ranked Zürich first on a list of the top 25 cities in the world "to make a base within". According to several surveys from 2006 to 2008, Zürich was named the city with the best quality of life in the world as well as the wealthiest city in Europe in terms of GDP per capita.
5
Routes
1555.26
Kilometers
31.47
Hours
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Bern Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Bern", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Bern or Berne (German: Bern [bɛrn] (listen); Alemannic German: Bärn [b̥æːrn]; French: Berne [bɛʁn] (listen); Italian: Berna [ˈbɛrna]; Romansh: Berna [ˈbɛrnɐ] (listen)) is the de facto capital of Switzerland, referred to by the Swiss as their "federal city", in German Bundesstadt, French ville fédérale, and Italian città federale. With a population of about 140,000 (as of 2019), Bern is the fifth-most populous city in Switzerland. The Bern agglomeration, which includes 36 municipalities, had a population of 406,900 in 2014. The metropolitan area had a population of 660,000 in 2000. Bern is also the capital of the canton of Bern, the second-most populous of Switzerland's cantons. The official language in Bern is (the Swiss variety of Standard) German, but the most-spoken language is an Alemannic Swiss German dialect, Bernese German. In 1983, the historic old town (in German: Altstadt) in the centre of Bern became a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
4
Routes
1290.14
Kilometers
27.3
Hours
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Luzern Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Luzern", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Lucerne ( loo-SURN; German: Luzern [luˈtsɛrn] (listen); Lucerne German: Lozärn; French: Lucerne [lysɛʁn]; Italian: Lucerna [luˈtʃɛrna]; Romansh: Lucerna [luˈtsɛrnɐ] (listen)) is a city in central Switzerland, in the German-speaking portion of the country. Lucerne is the capital of the canton of Lucerne and part of the district of the same name. With a population of about 81,057 people (as of 2013), Lucerne is the most populous town in Central Switzerland, and a nexus of economics, transportation, culture, and media of this region. The city's urban area consists of 17 municipalities and towns located in three different cantons with an overall population of about 250,000 people (as of 2007).Owing to its location on the shores of Lake Lucerne (German: Vierwaldstättersee) and its outflow, the river Reuss, within sight of the mounts Pilatus and Rigi in the Swiss Alps, Lucerne has long been a destination for tourists. One of the city's famous landmarks is the Chapel Bridge (German: Kapellbrücke), a wooden bridge first erected in the 14th century. The official language of Lucerne is (the Swiss variety of Standard) German, but the main spoken language is the local variant of the Alemannic Swiss German dialect.
5
Routes
1764.67
Kilometers
37.04
Hours
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Uri Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Uri", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
A Uniform Resource Identifier (URI) is a string of characters that unambiguously identifies a particular resource. To guarantee uniformity, all URIs follow a predefined set of syntax rules, but also maintain extensibility through a separately defined hierarchical naming scheme (e.g. http://). Such identification enables interaction with representations of the resource over a network, typically the World Wide Web, using specific protocols. Schemes specifying a concrete syntax and associated protocols define each URI. The most common form of URI is the Uniform Resource Locator (URL), frequently referred to informally as a web address. More rarely seen in usage is the Uniform Resource Name (URN), which was designed to complement URLs by providing a mechanism for the identification of resources in particular namespaces.
4
Routes
1290.14
Kilometers
27.3
Hours
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Schwyz Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Schwyz", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The town of Schwyz (German pronunciation: [ʃviːts] (listen); French: Schwytz; Italian: Svitto) is the capital of the canton of Schwyz in Switzerland. The Federal Charter of 1291 or Bundesbrief, the charter that eventually led to the foundation of Switzerland, can be seen at the Bundesbriefmuseum. The official language of Schwyz is (the Swiss variety of Standard) German, but the main spoken language is the local variant of the Alemannic Swiss German dialect.
2
Routes
591.36
Kilometers
12.2
Hours
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Obwalden Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Obwalden", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The canton of Obwalden, also canton of Obwald (German: Kanton Obwalden ˈɔbˌvaldən ) is a canton of Switzerland. It is located in the centre of Switzerland. Its capital is Sarnen. The canton contains the geographical centre of Switzerland.
2
Routes
591.36
Kilometers
12.2
Hours
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Nidwalden Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Nidwalden", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The canton of Nidwalden, also canton of Nidwald (German: Kanton Nidwalden ˈnidˌvaldən ) is a canton of Switzerland. It is located in the centre of Switzerland. The population is 40,287 (in 2007) of which 4,046 (or 10%) are foreigners. The capital is Stans.
3
Routes
1082.3
Kilometers
22.87
Hours
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Glarus Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Glarus", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Glarus (German: [ˈɡlaːrʊs] (listen); Alemannic German: Glaris; French: Glaris; Italian: Glarona; Romansh: Glaruna) is the capital of the canton of Glarus in Switzerland. Since 1 January 2011, the municipality Glarus incorporates the former municipalities of Ennenda, Netstal and Riedern.Glarus lies on the river Linth between the foot of the Glärnisch (part of the Schwyzer Alps) to the west and the Schilt (Glarus Alps)to the east. Very few buildings built before the fire of 1861 remain. Wood, textile, and plastics, as well as printing, are the dominant industries. The symbol of the city is the neo-romanesque city church. The official language of Glarus is (the Swiss variety of Standard) German, but the main spoken language is the local Alemannic Swiss German dialect.
1
Routes
278.54
Kilometers
6.53
Hours
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Zug Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Zug", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Zug (German: Zug, [tsuːɡ] (listen); French: Zoug; Italian: Zugo; Romansh: Zug; New Latin: Tugium) is the capital and biggest town of the canton of Zug in Switzerland. Its name originates from the fishing vocabulary; in the Middle Ages it referred to the right to pull up fishing nets and hence to the right to fish. A municipality, it had a total population of 30,205 inhabitants as of 31 December 2017. The official language of Zug is (the Swiss variety of Standard) German, but the main spoken language is the local variant of the Alemannic Swiss German dialect.
2
Routes
701.64
Kilometers
14.63
Hours
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Solothurn Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Solothurn", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Solothurn (German: Solothurn pronounced [ˈzoːlotʊrn] (listen); French: Soleure [sɔlœʁ]; Italian: Soletta [soˈletːa]; Romansh: Soloturn) is a town, a municipality, and the capital of the canton of Solothurn in Switzerland. It is located in the north-west of Switzerland on the banks of the Aare and on the foot of the Weissenstein Jura mountains. The town is the only municipality of the district of the same name. The town got its name from Salodurum, a Roman-era settlement. From 1530 to 1792 it was the seat of the French ambassador to Switzerland. The pedestrian-only old town was built between 1530 and 1792 and shows an impressive array of Baroque architecture, combining Italian Grandezza, French style, and Swiss ideas. The town has eighteen structures listed as heritage sites. Agriculture, once the dominant sector of employment, has become almost non-existent. Most people today are employed in manufacturing and education. The official language of Solothurn is (the Swiss variety of Standard) German, but the main spoken language is the local variant of the Alemannic Swiss German dialect.
2
Routes
701.64
Kilometers
14.63
Hours
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Basel Landschaft Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Basel Landschaft", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The canton of Basel-Landschaft (German: Kanton Basel-Landschaft , English: canton of Basel-Country, French: canton de Bâle-Campagne, Italian: Cantone di Basilea Campagna; informally: Baselland, Baselbiet), is one of the 26 cantons of Switzerland. The capital is Liestal. It shares borders with the Swiss cantons of Basel-Stadt, Solothurn, Jura and Aargau, and with the French région of Grand Est and the German state of Baden-Württemberg.
1
Routes
162.06
Kilometers
3.05
Hours
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Schaffhausen Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Schaffhausen", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Schaffhausen (German: [ˈʃafˌhaʊzn̩] (listen); Alemannic German: Schafuuse; French: Schaffhouse; Italian: Sciaffusa; Romansh: Schaffusa; English: Shaffhouse) is a town with historic roots, a municipality in northern Switzerland, and the capital of the canton of the same name; it has an estimated population of 36,000 as of December 2016. It is located right next to the shore of the High Rhine; it is one of four Swiss towns located on the northern side of the Rhine, along with Neuhausen a. Rhf., the historic Neunkirch, and Stein a. Rh.. The old portion of the town has many fine Renaissance era buildings decorated with exterior frescos and sculpture, as well as the old canton fortress, the Munot. Schaffhausen is also a railway junction of Swiss and German rail networks. One of the lines connects the town with the nearby Rhine Falls in Neuhausen am Rheinfall, Europe's largest waterfall, a tourist attraction. The official language of Schaffhausen is (the Swiss variety of Standard) German, but the main spoken language is the local variant of the Alemannic Swiss German dialect.
2
Routes
693.48
Kilometers
14.08
Hours
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Sankt Gallen Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Sankt Gallen", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Sankt Gallen may refer to: St. Gallen, town in Switzerland Canton of St. Gallen, Switzerland Abbey of Saint Gall, Switzerland Sankt Gallen, Styria, municipality in Austria St. Gall (disambiguation)
7
Routes
2470.33
Kilometers
49.6
Hours
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Graubunden Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Graubunden", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The canton of (the) Grisons, or canton of Graubünden, is the largest and easternmost canton of Switzerland. It has international borders with Italy, Austria, and Liechtenstein. Its German name, Graubünden, translates as the "Grey Leagues", referring to the canton's origin in three local alliances, the League of God's House, the Grey League, and the League of the Ten Jurisdictions. Grisons is also home to three of Switzerland's ethnic and linguistic groups, whose spoken languages—Swiss German, Italian, and Romansh—are all native to the canton. It is the only officially trilingual canton and the only canton where the Romansh language has official status.
1
Routes
281.4
Kilometers
6.04
Hours
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Aargau Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Aargau", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The canton of Aargau (German: Kanton Aargau [ˈaːrɡaʊ] (listen); sometimes Latinized as Argovia; see also other names) is one of the more northerly cantons of Switzerland. It is situated by the lower course of the Aare, which is why the canton is called Aar-gau (meaning "Aare province"). It is one of the most densely populated regions of Switzerland.
3
Routes
1309.08
Kilometers
26.19
Hours
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Ticino Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Ticino", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The canton of Ticino (), formally the Republic and Canton of Ticino, is the southernmost canton of Switzerland. Ticino borders the canton of Uri to the north, the canton of Valais to the west (through the Novena Pass), the canton of Graubünden to the northeast, Italy's regions of Piedmont and Lombardy to the south and it surrounds the small Italian enclave of Campione d'Italia. Named after the river Ticino, it is the only canton where Italian is the sole official language and represents the bulk of the Italian-speaking area of Switzerland along with the southern parts of Graubünden. The land now occupied by the canton was annexed from Italian cities in the 15th century by various Swiss forces in the last transalpine campaigns of the Old Swiss Confederacy. In the Helvetic Republic, established 1798, it was divided between the two new cantons of Bellinzona and Lugano. The creation of the Swiss Confederation in 1803 saw these two cantons combine to form the modern canton of Ticino.
1
Routes
331.23
Kilometers
7.21
Hours
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Vaud Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Vaud", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The canton of Vaud ( VOH, French: [vo]; German: Waadt, pronounced [vat] (listen) or [vaːt]) is the third largest of the Swiss cantons by population and fourth by size. It is located in Romandy, the French-speaking western part of the country; and borders the canton of Neuchâtel to the north, the cantons of Fribourg and Bern to the east, Valais and Lake Geneva to the south, the canton of Geneva to the south-west and France (Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes and Bourgogne-Franche-Comté) to the west. The capital and biggest city is Lausanne, officially designated "Olympic Capital" by the International Olympic Committee and hosts many international sports organizations. Other main cities are Yverdon-les-Bains and Montreux. As of 2017 the canton has a population of 793,129.
3
Routes
1226
Kilometers
25.52
Hours
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Wallis Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Wallis", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Wallis (derived from Wallace) may refer to:
1
Routes
281.4
Kilometers
6.04
Hours
Show region map
Jura Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Jura", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Jura may refer to:
1
Routes
409.18
Kilometers
8.14
Hours
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Liechtenstein Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Liechtenstein", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Liechtenstein ( (listen) LIK-tən-styne; German: [ˈlɪçtn̩ʃtaɪn]), officially the Principality of Liechtenstein (German: Fürstentum Liechtenstein), is a doubly landlocked German-speaking microstate in Alpine Central Europe. The principality is a constitutional monarchy headed by the Prince of Liechtenstein. Liechtenstein is bordered by Switzerland to the west and south and Austria to the east and north. It is Europe's fourth-smallest country, with an area of just over 160 square kilometres (62 square miles) and a population of 37,877. Divided into 11 municipalities, its capital is Vaduz, and its largest municipality is Schaan. It is also the smallest country to border two countries. It along with Uzbekistan are the only two doubly landlocked countries in the world. Economically, Liechtenstein has one of the highest gross domestic products per person in the world when adjusted for purchasing power parity. It was once known as a billionaire tax haven, but is no longer on any blacklists of uncooperative tax haven countries (see taxation section). An Alpine country, Liechtenstein is mountainous, making it a winter sport destination. The country has a strong financial sector centered in Vaduz. Almost 20,000 people commute to work in Liechtenstein. Liechtenstein is a member of the United Nations, the European Free Trade Association, and the Council of Europe, and although not a member of the European Union, it participates in both the Schengen Area and the European Economic Area. It also has a customs union and a monetary union with Switzerland.
5
Routes
1575.56
Kilometers
31.28
Hours
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Lombardije Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Lombardije", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The Giro di Lombardia (English: Tour of Lombardy), officially Il Lombardia, is a cycling race in Lombardy, Italy. It is traditionally the last of the five 'Monuments' of the season, considered to be one of the most prestigious one-day events in cycling, and one of the last events on the UCI World Tour calendar. Nicknamed the Classica delle foglie morte ("the Classic of the falling (dead) leaves"), it is the most important Autumn Classic in cycling. The race's most famous climb is the Madonna del Ghisallo in the race finale. The first edition was held in 1905. Since its creation, the Giro di Lombardia has been the classic with the fewest interruptions in cycling; only the editions of 1943 and 1944 were cancelled for reasons of war. Italian Fausto Coppi won a record five times. Because of its demanding course, the race is considered a climbers classic, favouring climbers with a strong sprint finish.
2
Routes
483
Kilometers
9.47
Hours
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Trentino Zuid Tirol Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Trentino Zuid Tirol", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The Indo-European languages include some 449 (SIL estimate, 2018 edition) languages and dialects spoken by about or more than 3.5 billion people (roughly half of the world population). Most of the major languages belonging to language branches and groups of Europe, and Western and southern Asia, belong to the Indo-European language family. Therefore, Indo-European is the biggest language family in the world by number of mother tongue speakers (but not by number of languages in which it is the 3rd or 5th biggest). Eight of the top ten biggest languages, by number of native speakers, are Indo-European. One of these languages, English, is the De facto World Lingua Franca with an estimate of over one billion second language speakers. Each subfamily or linguistic branch in this list contains many subgroups and individual languages. Indo-European language family has 10 known branches or subfamilies, of which eight are living and two are extinct. The relation of Indo-European branches, how they are related to one another and branched from the ancestral proto-language is a matter of further research and not yet well known. There are some individual Indo-European languages that are unclassified within the language family, they are not yet classified in a branch and could be members of their own branch. The 449 Indo-European languages identified in the SIL estimate, 2018 edition, are mostly living languages, however, if all the known extinct Indo-European languages are added, they number more than 800. This list includes all known Indo-European languages, living and extinct. A distinction between a language and a dialect is not clear-cut and simple because there is, in many cases, several dialect continuums, transitional dialects and languages and also because there is no consensual standard to what amount of vocabulary, grammar, pronunciation and prosody differences there is a language or there is a dialect (mutual intelligibility can be a standard but there are closely related languages that are also mutual intelligible to some degree, even if it is an asymmetric intelligibility). Because of this, in this list, several dialect groups and some individual dialects of languages are shown (in italics), especially if a language is or was spoken by a large number of people and over a big land area, but also if it has or had divergent dialects. The ancestral population and language, Proto-Indo-Europeans that spoke Proto-Indo-European, estimated to have lived about 4500 BCE (6500 BP), at some time in the past, starting about 4000 BCE (6000 BP) expanded through migration and cultural influence. This started a complex process of population blend or population replacement, acculturation and language change of peoples in many regions of western and southern Eurasia. This process gave origin to many languages and branches of this language family. At the end of the second millennium BC Indo-European speakers were many millions and lived in a vast geographical area in most of western and southern Eurasia (including western Central Asia). In the following two millennia the number of speakers of Indo-European languages increased even further. By geographical area, Indo-European languages remained spoken in big land areas, although most of western Central Asia and Asia Minor was lost to another language family (mainly Turkic) due to Turkic expansion, conquests and settlement (after the middle of the first millennium AD and the beginning and middle of the second millennium AD respectively) and also to Mongol invasions and conquests (that changed Central Asia ethnolinguistic composition). Another land area lost to non-Indo-European languages was today's Hungary due to Magyar/Hungarian (Uralic language speakers) conquest and settlement. However, in the second half of the second millennium AD, Indo-European languages expanded their territories to North Asia (Siberia), through Russian expansion, and North America, South America, Australia and New Zealand as the result of the age of European discoveries and European conquests through the expansions of the Portuguese, Spanish, French, English and the Dutch (these peoples had the biggest continental or maritime empires in the world and their countries were major powers). The contact between different peoples and languages, especially as a result of European colonization, also gave origin to the many pidgins, creoles and mixed languages that are mainly based in Indo-European languages (many of which are spoken in island groups and coastal regions).
Central Switzerland day 09 Round trip from Lucerne
27-04-2019
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Central Switzerland day 10 Round trip from Lucerne
27-04-2019
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Prattigau naar Lombardije
13-10-2018
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Centraal Zwitserland
13-10-2018
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Zwartewoud Baden Baden naar Schopfheim
04-02-2019
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Nauders Livigno Stelvio
16-02-2019
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Garda meer Lindau Bodensee
23-02-2019
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Todtnau Ueber die Grenze in die Schweiz
17-03-2019
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Bex Lanslebourg Rhonedal Mont Cenis
23-03-2019
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D CH Todtnauberg Schluchsee Schaffhausen Todtnauberg 162km
25-06-2018
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