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The prettiest verified routes in Spain

 
MyRoute-app helps you with planning your dream journey! All routes on the page have been verified by our RouteXperts. De routes are categorized in regions, when you click on 'view region' you will see all verified routes for that region that are free to use.
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46
Amount of active RouteXperts (worldwide)
1478
Amount of routes reviewed by RouteXperts (worldwide)
78920
Amount of downloaded routes (worldwide)
46227
Amount of visits (Spain)
59
Amount of routes verified by RouteXperts (Spain)
1219
Amount of downloaded routes (Spain)
Route collections
The route collections by MyRoute-app are collections of multiple routes that belong to each other and checked by MRA RouteXperts. All routes are identical for TomTom, Garmin and MyRoute-app Navigation.
10
Routes
3009.78
Kilometers
78.91
Hours
View route collection The 10 most downloaded routes in Spain from RouteXpert Rene Plucken
About this route collection
Hello and welcome to this collection of the Top 10 MyRoute app downloaded routes in Spain>.

There will be a great new event to be announced soon, where all these routes can be ridden.
Download them all now and place them in a new "Top 10" folder, so that you always have them at hand.

If you are going to drive one of these routes in the meantime, track them with the MRA Mobile App or with MRA Navigation. Take some photos (moments) along the way as these will come in handy.
Create a travelstory of your Top 10 driven routes and add the recorded track to it.

There will also be some great prizes on offer, so keep an eye on the MRA-RouteXperts page and your email.


The 10 routes are:

1. el Pont de Suert to Sabinanigo
2. Figueres to Coll de Nargo
3. Villacarriedo to Potes
4. Caldes to Jaca
5. Jaca to Bilbao
6. Roundtrip Picos
7. Girona to Peramola
8. Peramola to Caldes
9. Guernica to Villacarriedo
10. Sabinanigo to Gernica
10
Routes
2960.47
Kilometers
71.22
Hours
View route collection Ten Day Roadtrip from Spain to Portugal
About this route collection
This route collection describes a 10-day Road trip in the north of Spain and Portugal, a true paradise for motorcycling.

You drive over beautiful mountain ridges and through beautiful valleys. Along the way you drive through beautiful villages and countless nature reserves, great passes with countless curves, tunnels cut out of the mountains and azure blue reservoirs. The roads are fair to good, sometimes unpaved.

What you get to see along the way;
Spanish Pyrenees
Parc Naturel del Cadi-Moixero
Serra del Cadí
Serra de Moixeró
Pedraforca
Serra del Monsec
Collada de Clarà
Parque Nacional de Ordesa y Monte Perdido
Collados del Asón Natural Park.
Parque natural Saja-Besaya
Parque natural de Fuentes Carrionas y Fuente Cobre
Parque natural de la Montana de Riano y Mampodre
Picos de Europa
El Parque regional Montaña de Riaño y Mampodre
El Parque natural de Redes
The Sierra de la Culebra
Parque natural Montesinho


Along the routes there are more than enough nice places to stop for a short or longer period, these are described in the review and with a waypoint and POI included in the routes.

Have fun reading and planning your next motorcycle vacation.
If you have ridden these routes I would like to hear your feedback.
7
Routes
1913.97
Kilometers
57.69
Hours
View route collection 7 day roundtrip from Girona to Catalonia Andorra and the Pyrenees
About this route collection
The Pyrenees stretch for more than 450 kilometers from the Bay of Biscay in the west to the Cap de Creus on the Mediterranean. The mountain range, with peaks of more than 3000 meters, forms a natural barrier that separates the Iberian Peninsula from the rest of Europe. The main ridge of the mountain range also largely forms the state border between France and Spain, while the miniature state of Andorra lies between these two countries.

Bordering the Pyrenees is Catalonia, the hinterland of Barcelona. No wonder many new models of motorcycles are being introduced to the press in Catalonia. There are many ways to put the new models to the test there. An additional advantage is that it is very quiet! You would almost say 'too quiet' because there is a danger that you will use the entire width of the road at some point, under the guise of 'you won't see oncoming traffic here' .... But let's keep it safe and stay on the right side of the center line.

These seven routes of this collection run through these beautiful areas. These are all routes where especially the sides of the tires have to endure a lot. Whether on the gentle slopes in Catalonia or on the balcony roads in the Gorges in the French Pyrenees, make sure they are on tension, because you can bet it will be exciting!

A few attractions are discussed per route in the review. These often tell something about the history of the area in which you are driving. Fun facts, quite educational. There are also indicated places where you can refuel and where you can drink coffee and / or have lunch. You are completely free to visit these places, you can of course also determine your own interesting points.
But the most important thing you've probably traveled to this area for is simply driving. And as mentioned above, you are in a true motorcycle paradise where the steering is fantastic!

Each route ends at a hotel. It is of course not an obligation to use these hotels, you can always look for another place to stay in the area, that decision is yours. However, my experience is that they are all simple but good hotels for a very reasonable price. They are known and can be booked at booking.com.

The routes of these collections:

R01 - Girona to Sant Julia de Loria, 269km
R02 - Sant Julia de Loria to Pierrefitte Nestalas, 290km
R03 - Pierrefitte Nestalas to Barbastro, 291km
R04 - Barbastro to Puig Reig, 266km
R05 - Puig Reig to Figueres, 268km
R06 - Figueres to Quillan, 243km
R07 - Quillan to Gironam, 286km

Have fun riding these routes!
3
Routes
837.35
Kilometers
18.15
Hours
View route collection Three tours in and around Picos de Europa Northern Spain
About this route collection
The Picos de Europa is a mountainous region in Northern Spain, next to the Basque Country. In the middle is the village of Posada de Valdeon, which can not be reached by motor from the north: you have to drive around the Picos via Potes or Sames. We stayed overnight in Posada de Valdeon at Hostal Casa Abascal. A great hotel with breakfast option. You can eat in a restaurant in the village with a choice of two menus.

All around the Picos are all kinds of nature reserves. These three routes will take you through some of them. There are gorges to see, viewpoints, reservoirs and you can walk more than fine. If you like walking, bring your walking shoes.

But we come to drive and it is going very well. Fine roads with an occasional piece of unpaved road so you don't have to make a detour for another attraction. You can eat delicious food and the people are very nice and hospitable. And because the route goes to the top of the Picos to Lourdes, there are also pilgrimage sites and very beautiful churches and monasteries. The most beautiful in this area is nature: breathtakingly beautiful with wild animals, rugged mountains and wild rivers.

All in all, you can spend at least 4 days here if you take a day off or go for a walk.
4
Routes
1968.56
Kilometers
40.8
Hours
Show region map
Nouvelle Aquitaine Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Nouvelle Aquitaine", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Nouvelle-Aquitaine (French pronunciation: [nuvɛl akitɛn] (listen); Occitan: Nòva Aquitània [ˈnɔβɔ akiˈtanjɔ] or Novèla Aquitània [nuˈβɛlɔ akiˈtanjɔ]; Basque: Akitania Berria; Poitevin-Saintongeais: Novéle-Aguiéne; lit. 'New Aquitaine') is the largest administrative region in France, spanning the west and southwest of the mainland. The region was created by the territorial reform of French regions in 2014 through the merger of three regions: Aquitaine, Limousin and Poitou-Charentes. It covers 84,036 km2 (32,446 sq mi) – or 1⁄8 of the country – and has 5,956,978 inhabitants (municipal population on 1 January 2017). The new region was established on 1 January 2016, following the regional elections in December 2015.It is the largest region in France by area, with a territory slightly larger than that of Austria; even French Guiana is smaller. Its prefecture and largest city, Bordeaux, together with its suburbs and satellite cities, forms the seventh-largest metropolitan area of France, with 850,000 inhabitants. The region has 25 major urban areas, among which the most important after Bordeaux are Bayonne (288,000 inhabitants), Limoges (283,000), Poitiers (255,000), Pau (241,000) and La Rochelle (206,000), as well as eleven major clusters. The growth of its population, particularly marked on the coast, makes this one of the most attractive areas economically in France; the new region outperforms Île-de-France and Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur in demographic dynamism. After Île-de-France, New Aquitaine is the premier French region in research and innovation, with five universities (Bordeaux, La Rochelle, Limoges, Poitiers and Pau) and several Grandes Écoles. The agricultural region of Europe with the greatest turnover, it is the French region with the most tourism jobs, as it has three of the four historic resorts on the French Atlantic coast: Arcachon, Biarritz and Royan, as well as several ski resorts (most notably Gourette). It is the fifth French region for business creation (all sectors). Its economy is based on agriculture and viticulture (vineyards of Bordeaux and Cognac), tourism, a powerful aerospace industry, digital economy and design, parachemical and pharmaceutical industries, financial sector (Niort is the fourth-largest financial center in the nation, specialising in mutual insurance companies) and industrial ceramics (Limoges). The new region includes major parts of Southern France ("Midi de la France"), marked by Basque, Occitan, Poitevin and Saintongeais cultures. Historically, it is the "indirect successor" to medieval Aquitaine; it extends over a large part of the former Duchy of Eleanor of Aquitaine.
1
Routes
304.59
Kilometers
7.25
Hours
Show region map
Andalusi Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Andalusi", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The Arabic nisbah (attributive title) Al-Andalusi denotes an origin from Al-Andalus. Al-Andalusi may refer to: Abu Hayyan al-Gharnati Ibn Hazm Ibn Juzayy Ibn 'Atiyya Said Al-Andalusi Yaʿīsh ibn Ibrāhīm al-Umawī
13
Routes
4873.15
Kilometers
108.27
Hours
Show region map
Aragn Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Aragn", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
NGC 2985 is a spiral galaxy located in the constellation Ursa Major. It is located at a distance of circa 70 million light years from Earth, which, given its apparent dimensions, means that NGC 2985 is about 95,000 light years across. It was discovered by William Herschel on April 3, 1785.The galaxy is seen with an inclination of 37 degrees. The galaxy has a bright nucleus from which emanate multiple tightly wound spiral fragments. Numerous blue knots are visible at the galactic disk. At the outer part of the galaxy lies a massive spiral arm that forms a pseudoring that encircles the galaxy. The inner part of the galaxy, where active star formation has been observed, has been found to be unstable, contrary to the outer stable one. It has been suggested that the presence of molecular clouds accounts for the instability of the region.The nucleus of NGC 2985 is active, and based on its spectrum has been categorised as a LINER. The most accepted theory for the activity source is the presence of an accretion disk around a supermassive black hole. The mass of the supermassive black hole at the centre of NGC 2985 is estimated to be 160 million (108.2) M☉, based on stellar velocity dispersion. The velocity dispersion is anisotropic, and changes with the azimuth. The rotational speed of the galaxy at its effective radius is 222.9 ± 31.2 km/s.NGC 2985 is the brightest member of a galaxy group known as the NGC 2985 group. Other members of the group include NGC 3027, 25 arcminutes away. Other nearby galaxies include NGC 3252, and NGC 3403.
10
Routes
2651.23
Kilometers
57.35
Hours
Show region map
Asturi Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Asturi", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Zwentendorf an der Donau is a small market municipality in the Austrian state of Lower Austria. It is located at 48°21′N 15°54′E, in the Tulln Basin on the southern bank of the Danube. The place attained public attention as the site of the only Austrian nuclear power station, which was completed but never went into operation. In a referendum on 5 November 1978, a narrow majority of 50.5% voted against putting the Zwentendorf nuclear plant into operation.
6
Routes
1862.58
Kilometers
52.36
Hours
Show region map
Baskenland Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Baskenland", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The Tour of the Basque Country (Officially: Itzulia Basque Country, Spanish: Vuelta al País Vasco, Basque: Euskal Herriko Itzulia) is an annual cycling stage race held in the Spanish Basque Country in April. It is one of the races that make up the UCI World Tour calendar. As the Basque Country is a mountainous area, there are few flat stages, and thus the event favors those who are strong climbers. The race is characterized by its short stages, rarely exceeding 200 km, and steep ascents. While the ascents featured in the race aren't particularly high compared to other stage races, they are among the steepest seen in professional cycling, some having sections with gradients reaching well above 20%.
4
Routes
777.07
Kilometers
22.88
Hours
Show region map
Canarische Eilanden Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Canarische Eilanden", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Groningen Airport Eelde (IATA: GRQ, ICAO: EHGG) is a minor international airport in the northeastern Netherlands. It is located near Eelde, 4.8 nautical miles (8.9 km; 5.5 mi) south of the city of Groningen. In 2015, the airport handled 220,710 passengers. The airport is also the home base of the KLM Flight Academy, Noord Nederlandse Aero Club (NNAC) and General Enterprises. The airport started under the name "Hakenkampsveld" in 1928 and was officially opened in 1931. It was renamed "Luchthaven Eelde" in 1933. During World War II, the German military occupied the airport. Since 1958, there are European destinations from the airport. Since 1988, the airport has been called Groningen Airport Eelde.
15
Routes
4240.29
Kilometers
100.88
Hours
Show region map
Cantabrie Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Cantabrie", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The Vuelta a Cantabria is a multi-day road cycling race held annually in the region of Cantabria, Spain. Created in 1925, the race was also held in 1926, 1940 and 1942, and annually from 1963 to 1983. In 2003, the race reappeared after a 20 year disappearance and is now reserved to amateur cyclists.
2
Routes
753.08
Kilometers
13.7
Hours
Show region map
Castilie La Mancha Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Castilie La Mancha", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
24
Routes
7095.35
Kilometers
155.68
Hours
Show region map
Castilieen Leon Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Castilieen Leon", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
18
Routes
5932.08
Kilometers
143
Hours
Show region map
Catalonie Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Catalonie", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The Crown of Aragon (; Aragonese: Corona d'Aragón; Catalan: Corona d'Aragó; Spanish: Corona de Aragón) was a composite monarchy ruled by one king, originated by the dynastic union of the Kingdom of Aragon and the County of Barcelona and ended as a consequence of the Spanish War of Succession. At the height of its power in the 14th and 15th centuries, the Crown of Aragon was a thalassocracy controlling a large portion of present-day eastern Spain, parts of what is now southern France, and a Mediterranean "empire" which included the Balearic Islands, Sicily, Corsica, Sardinia, Malta, Southern Italy (from 1442) and parts of Greece (until 1388). The component realms of the Crown were not united politically except at the level of the king, who ruled over each autonomous polity according to its own laws, raising funds under each tax structure, dealing separately with each Corts or Cortes, particularly the Kingdom of Aragon, the Principality of Catalonia and the Kingdom of Valencia. The larger Crown of Aragon must not be confused with one of its constituent parts, the Kingdom of Aragon, from which it takes its name. In 1469, a new dynastic union of the Crown of Aragon with the Crown of Castile by the Catholic Monarchs, joining what contemporaries referred to as "the Spains", led to what would become the Monarchy of Spain, as a composite monarchy under Habsburg monarchs. The Crown remained until it was abolished by the Nueva Planta decrees issued by King Philip V in 1716 as a consequence of the defeat of Archduke Charles (as Charles III of Aragon) in the War of the Spanish Succession.
2
Routes
519.19
Kilometers
9.52
Hours
Show region map
Extremadura Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Extremadura", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Extremadura ( EK-strim-ə-DEWR-ə, Spanish: [e(k)stɾemaˈðuɾa]; Extremaduran: Estremaúra; Portuguese: Estremadura; Fala: Extremaúra) is an autonomous community of Spain. Its capital city is Mérida. Located in the central-western part of the Iberian Peninsula, it is made up of the two largest provinces of Spain: Cáceres and Badajoz. Extremadura is bordered by Portugal to the west and by the autonomous communities of Castile and León (north), Castilla–La Mancha (east) and Andalusia (south). Its official language is Spanish. It is an important area for wildlife, particularly with the major reserve at Monfragüe, which was designated a National Park in 2007, and the International Tagus River Natural Park (Parque Natural Tajo Internacional). The regional executive body, led by the President of Extremadura, is called Junta de Extremadura. The Day of Extremadura is celebrated on 8 September. It coincides with the Catholic festivity of Our Lady of Guadalupe. The region is at the centre of Spain's plans for energy transition and a decarbonisation, thanks to the installation of large solar power plants and the granting of lithium mining licenses. However, such prospects have sparked criticism and concern regarding how to avoid a "third energy colonisation" after those of the construction of reservoirs for hydroelectric use and the building of nuclear power plants.
1
Routes
275.72
Kilometers
6.69
Hours
Show region map
Galicie Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Galicie", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Galicia (; Ukrainian and Rusyn: Галичина, romanized: Halychyna; Polish: Galicja; Russian: Галиция, romanized: Galitsiya; Czech and Slovak: Halič; German: Galizien; Hungarian: Galícia/Gácsország/Halics; Romanian: Galiția/Halici; Yiddish: גאַליציע‎, romanized: Galitsiye) was a historical and geographic region at the crossroad of Central and Eastern Europe. It was once the small Kingdom of Galicia–Volhynia and later a crown land of Austria-Hungary, the Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria, which straddled the modern-day border between Poland and Ukraine. The area, named after the medieval city of Halych, was first mentioned in Hungarian historical chronicles in the year 1206 as Galiciæ. In 1253, Prince Daniel of Galicia was crowned the King of Rus (Latin: Rex Rusiae) or King of Ruthenia following the Mongol invasion of Kievan Rus'. In 1352, the Kingdom of Poland annexed the Kingdom of Galicia and Volhynia as the Ruthenian Voivodeship (Latin: Palatinatus Russiae). The nucleus of historic Galicia lies within the modern regions of western Ukraine: the Lviv, Ternopil and Ivano-Frankivsk oblasts near Halych. In the 18th century, territories that later became part of the modern Polish regions of the Lesser Poland Voivodeship, Subcarpathian Voivodeship and Silesian Voivodeship were added to Galicia. It covers much of such historic regions as Red Ruthenia (centered on Lviv) and Lesser Poland (centered in Kraków). Galicia became contested ground between Poland and Ruthenia from medieval times, and in the 20th century between Poland and Ukraine. In the 10th century, several cities were founded in Galicia, such as Volodymyr and Jaroslaw, whose names mark their connections with the Grand Princes of Kiev. There is considerable overlap between Galicia and Podolia (to the east) as well as between Galicia and south-west Ruthenia, especially in a cross-border region (centred on Carpathian Ruthenia) inhabited by various nationalities and religious groups.
1
Routes
379.09
Kilometers
7.14
Hours
Show region map
Madrid Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Madrid", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Madrid (, Spanish: [maˈðɾið]) is the capital and most-populous city of Spain. The city has almost 3.4 million inhabitants and a metropolitan area population of approximately 6.7 million. It is the second-largest city in the European Union (EU), surpassed only by Berlin in its administrative limits, and its monocentric metropolitan area is the second-largest in the EU, surpassed only by Paris. The municipality covers 604.3 km2 (233.3 sq mi) geographical area.Madrid lies on the River Manzanares in the center of both the country and the Community of Madrid region, of which it is also the capital. As the capital city of Spain, seat of government, residence of the Spanish monarch, Madrid is also the political, economic and cultural centre of the country. The mayor is José Luis Martínez-Almeida from the People's Party. The Madrid urban agglomeration has the third-largest GDP in the European Union and its influence in politics, education, entertainment, environment, media, fashion, science, culture, and the arts all contribute to its status as one of the world's major global cities. Madrid is home to two world-famous football clubs, Real Madrid and Atlético Madrid. Due to its economic output, high standard of living, and market size, Madrid is considered the major financial centre and the leading economic hub of the Iberian Peninsula and of Southern Europe. It hosts the head offices of the vast majority of major Spanish companies, such as Telefónica, IAG or Repsol. Madrid is also the 8th most liveable city in the world according to Monocle magazine, in its 2019 index.Madrid houses the headquarters of the UN's World Tourism Organization (UNWTO), the Ibero-American General Secretariat (SEGIB), the Organization of Ibero-American States (OEI), and the Public Interest Oversight Board (PIOB). It also hosts major international regulators and promoters of the Spanish language: the Standing Committee of the Association of Spanish Language Academies, headquarters of the Royal Spanish Academy (RAE), the Instituto Cervantes and the Foundation of Urgent Spanish (Fundéu BBVA). Madrid organises fairs such as FITUR, ARCO, SIMO TCI and the Madrid Fashion Week.While Madrid possesses modern infrastructure, it has preserved the look and feel of many of its historic neighbourhoods and streets. Its landmarks include the Plaza Mayor, the Royal Palace of Madrid; the Royal Theatre with its restored 1850 Opera House; the Buen Retiro Park, founded in 1631; the 19th-century National Library building (founded in 1712) containing some of Spain's historical archives; many national museums, and the Golden Triangle of Art, located along the Paseo del Prado and comprising three art museums: Prado Museum, the Reina Sofía Museum, a museum of modern art, and the Thyssen-Bornemisza Museum, which complements the holdings of the other two museums. Cibeles Palace and Fountain has become one of the monument symbols of the city.
1
Routes
373.99
Kilometers
6.56
Hours
Show region map
Murcia Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Murcia", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Murcia (, US also , Spanish: [ˈmuɾθja] (listen)) is a city in south-eastern Spain, the capital and most populous city of the Autonomous Community of the Region of Murcia, and the seventh largest city in the country, with a population of 447,182 inhabitants in 2018 (about one third of the total population of the Region). The population of the metropolitan area was 689,591 in 2010. It is located on the Segura River, in the southeast of the Iberian Peninsula; it has a climate with hot summers, mild winters, and relatively low precipitation. Murcia was founded by the emir of Cordoba Abd ar-Rahman II in 825 with the name Mursiyah (Arabic: مرسية‎). It is now mainly a services city and a university town. Highlights for visitors include the Cathedral of Murcia and a number of baroque buildings, renowned local cuisine, Holy Week procession works of art by the famous Murcian sculptor Francisco Salzillo, and the Fiestas de Primavera (Spring Festival). The city, as the capital of the comarca Huerta de Murcia is called Europe's orchard due to its long agricultural tradition and its fruit, vegetable, and flower production and exports.Murcia is located near the center of a low-lying fertile plain known as the huerta (orchard or vineyard) of Murcia. The Segura River and its right-hand tributary, the Guadalentín, run through the area. The city has an elevation of 43 metres (141 ft) above sea level and its municipality covers approximately 882 square kilometres (341 sq mi).The best known and most dominant aspect of the municipal area's landscape is the orchard. In addition to the orchard and urban zones, the great expanse of the municipal area is made up of different landscapes: badlands, groves of Carrasco pine trees in the precoastal mountain ranges and, towards the south, a semi-steppe region. A large natural park, the Parque Regional de Carrascoy y el Valle, lies just to the south of the city.
4
Routes
1316.13
Kilometers
29.2
Hours
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Navarra Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Navarra", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Navarre (English: ; Spanish: Navarra [naˈβara]; Basque: Nafarroa [nafaro.a]), officially the Chartered Community of Navarre (Spanish: Comunidad Foral de Navarra [komuniˈðað foˈɾal de naˈβara]; Basque: Nafarroako Foru Komunitatea [nafaro.ako foɾu komunitate.a]), is an autonomous community and province in northern Spain, bordering the Basque Autonomous Community, La Rioja, and Aragon in Spain and Nouvelle-Aquitaine in France. The capital city is Pamplona (or Iruñea in Basque). The present-day province makes up the majority of the territory of the medieval Kingdom of Navarre, a long-standing Pyrenean kingdom that occupied lands on both sides of the western Pyrenees, with its northernmost part, Lower Navarre, located in the southwest corner of France. Navarre is in the transition between Green Spain and semi-arid interior areas, causing a vast difference of landscapes between various parts of the region. The transition also renders a highly variable climate, with cooler spells and heat waves mixing in summer. Winters are mild for the latitude. Navarre is one of the historic Basque districts, with its Basque features conspicuous in the north, while virtually absent on the southern fringes. The best-known event in Navarre is the San Fermín festival in July held in Pamplona.
1
Routes
175.13
Kilometers
3.6
Hours
Show region map
La Rioja Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "La Rioja", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
La Rioja (UK: , US: , Spanish: [la ˈrjoxa]) is an autonomous community and province in Spain, in the north of the Iberian Peninsula. Its capital is Logroño. Other cities and towns in the province include Calahorra, Arnedo, Alfaro, Haro, Santo Domingo de la Calzada, and Nájera. It has an estimated population of 315,675 inhabitants (INE 2018), making it the least populated region of Spain. It covers part of the Ebro valley towards its north and the Iberian Range in the south. The community is a single province, so there is no County Council, and it is organized into 174 municipalities. It borders the Basque Country (province of Álava) to the north, Navarre to the northeast, Aragón to the southeast (province of Zaragoza), and Castilla y León to the west and south (provinces of Burgos and Soria). The area was once occupied by pre-Roman Berones, Pellendones and Vascones. After partial recapture from the Muslims in the early tenth century, the region became part of the Kingdom of Pamplona, later being incorporated into Castile after a century and a half of disputes. From the eighteenth century the Rioja region remained divided between the provinces of Burgos and Soria, until in 1833 the province of Logroño was created, changing the name of the province to La Rioja in 1980 as a prelude to its constitution under a single provincial autonomous community in 1982. The name "Rioja" (from Río Oja) is first attested in 1099. The region is well known for its wines under the brand Denominación de Origen Calificada Rioja.
1
Routes
373.99
Kilometers
6.56
Hours
Show region map
Valencia Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Valencia", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Valencia (Spanish: [baˈlenθja]), officially València (Valencian: [vaˈlensi.a], locally [baˈlensi.a]), is the capital of the autonomous community of Valencia and the third-largest city in Spain after Madrid and Barcelona, surpassing 800,000 inhabitants in the municipality. The wider urban area also comprising the neighbouring municipalities has a population of around 1.6 million. Valencia is Spain's third-largest metropolitan area, with a population ranging from 1.7 to 2.5 million depending on how the metropolitan area is defined. The Port of Valencia is the 5th-busiest container port in Europe and the busiest container port on the Mediterranean Sea. The city is ranked as a Gamma-level global city by the Globalization and World Cities Research Network.Valencia was founded as a Roman colony by the consul Decimus Junius Brutus Callaicus in 138 BC and called Valentia Edetanorum. In 714, Moroccan and Arab Moors occupied the city, introducing their language, religion and customs; they implemented improved irrigation systems and the cultivation of new crops as well. Valencia was the capital of the Taifa of Valencia. In 1238 the Christian king James I of Aragon conquered the city and divided the land among the nobles who helped him conquer it, as witnessed in the Llibre del Repartiment. He also created the new Kingdom of Valencia, which had its own laws (Furs), with Valencia as its main city and capital. In the 18th century Philip V of Spain abolished the privileges as punishment to the kingdom of Valencia for aligning with the Habsburg side in the War of the Spanish Succession. Valencia was the capital of Spain when Joseph Bonaparte moved the Court there in the summer of 1812. It also served as the capital between 1936 and 1937, during the Second Spanish Republic. The city is situated on the banks of the Turia, on the east coast of the Iberian Peninsula, fronting the Gulf of Valencia on the Mediterranean Sea. Its historic centre is one of the largest in Spain, with approximately 169 ha (420 acres). Due to its long history, Valencia has numerous celebrations and traditions, such as the Fallas, which were declared Fiestas of National Tourist Interest of Spain in 1965 and an Intangible cultural heritage by UNESCO in November 2016. Joan Ribó from Compromís has been the mayor of the city since 2015.
1
Routes
248.32
Kilometers
4.48
Hours
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Portalegre Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Portalegre", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Portalegre may refer to:
2
Routes
773.73
Kilometers
13.65
Hours
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Castelo Branco Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Castelo Branco", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Camilo Castelo Branco, 1st Viscount of Correia Botelho (Portuguese pronunciation: [kɐˈmilu kɐʃˈtɛlu ˈbɾɐ̃ku]; 16 March 1825 – 1 June 1890), was a prolific Portuguese writer of the 19th century, having produced over 260 books (mainly novels, plays and essays). His writing is considered original in that it combines the dramatic and sentimental spirit of Romanticism with a highly personal combination of sarcasm, bitterness and dark humour. He is also celebrated for his peculiar wit and anecdotal character, as well as for his turbulent (and ultimately tragical) life. His writing, which is centred in the local and the picturesque and is in a general sense affiliated with the Romantic tradition, is often regarded in contrast to that of Eça de Queiroz – a cosmopolitan dandy and a fervorous proponent of Realism, who was Camilo's literary contemporary in spite of being 20 years younger. In this tension between Camilo and Eça – often dubbed by critics the literary guerrilla – many have interpreted a synthesis of the two great tendencies present in the Portuguese literature of the 19th century. Allegations that he was initiated in Freemasonry in 1846, are somewhat contradictory as there are indications that, around the same time, during the Revolution of Maria da Fonte, he fought in favor of the Miguelists as "helper to the orders of the Scottish General Reinaldo MacDonell", who was active in the revived Order of Saint Michael of the Wing precisely to combat Masonry. Similarly, much of his literature demonstrates his ideals of legitimism and as a conservative and Catholic traditionalist.
2
Routes
773.73
Kilometers
13.65
Hours
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Guarda Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Guarda", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Guarda may refer to: Guarda, Portugal, city in Portugal Guarda District, the district containing that city Roman Catholic Diocese of Guarda, Portugal, the diocese containing that city Guarda, Switzerland, municipality in Grisons, Switzerland Guarda Veneta, municipality in the province of Rovigo, region of Veneto, Italy A Guarda, municipality in the province of Pontevedra, Galicia, Spain Guarda-Mor, municipality in Minas Gerais, Brazil
5
Routes
1721.68
Kilometers
31.46
Hours
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Braganca Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Braganca", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Bragança (Portuguese: [bɾɐˈɣɐ̃sɐ] (listen); Mirandese: Bergáncia), also known in English as Braganza (, also US: ), is a city and municipality in north-eastern Portugal, capital of the district of Bragança, in the Terras de Trás-os-Montes subregion of Portugal. The population in 2011 was 35,341, in an area of 1173.57 km².
1
Routes
279.31
Kilometers
5.64
Hours
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Vila Real Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Vila Real", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Vila Real (Portuguese pronunciation: [ˈvilɐ ʁiˈal] (listen)) is the capital and largest city of the Vila Real District, northern Portugal. The population in 2011 was 51,850, in an area of 378.80 square kilometres (146.26 sq mi).Vila Real was ranked seventh in the list of Portugal's most livable cities in the survey of living conditions published by the Portuguese newspaper Expresso in 2007.
1
Routes
172.66
Kilometers
4.33
Hours
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Vianado Castelo Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Vianado Castelo", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
Santander to Potes
22-01-2019
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Roundtrip Cain La Hermida Cervera de Pisuerga Riano
01-06-2020
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AD Soldeu Andorra la Vella Soldeu 170km
27-12-2018
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Ainsa to Andorra
07-10-2019
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Roundtrip La Gomera Canary Islands
20-10-2019
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Picos de Europa day 1 Round trip from Potes
01-02-2019
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Biarritz to Ainsa
24-09-2019
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Highlights of the Pyrenees
04-02-2019
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Riaza to the windmills of La Mancha
04-02-2019
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La Seu dUrgell to Carcassonne via Andorra
13-02-2019
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