Back to country overview
DrivingCyclingBy foot
 

The prettiest verified routes in France

 
MyRoute-app helps you with planning your dream journey! All routes on the page have been verified by our RouteXperts. De routes are categorized in regions, when you click on 'view region' you will see all verified routes for that region that are free to use.
Register More info
56
Amount of active RouteXperts (worldwide)
1206
Amount of routes reviewed by RouteXperts (worldwide)
51896
Amount of downloaded routes (worldwide)
86078
Amount of visits (France)
147
Amount of routes verified by RouteXperts (France)
3054
Amount of downloaded routes (France)
Route collections
The route collections by MyRoute-app are collections of multiple routes that belong to each other and checked by MRA RouteXperts. All routes are identical for TomTom, Garmin and MyRoute-app Navigation.
4
Routes
927.8
Kilometers
20.37
Hours
View route collection 4 great tours in Aubrac and Cantal
About this route collection
These tours leave from the holiday home in Labesserette in the Aubrac.
The Aubrac is an area in the Massif Central in France with volcanic granite plateaus between the valley of the Truyère in the west, north and north-east and the valley of the Lot in the south. Aubrac is located in the departments of Lozère, Cantal and Aveyron.
It is a hilly area. A place where sight is lost ... A thousand year old passage on the road to St-Jacques de Compostelle. This separate entity, with a very strong identity, became the Aubrac Regional Nature Park in 2018. An essential basis for the future of this very special area.
With its ocher-colored coat, its large lyre-shaped horns that float to the sky and its eyes that appear to be made of kohl, the Aubrac cow is instantly recognizable. Known for its beauty but also for its robustness, it is the symbol of the plateau.
Far away from the busy tourism you can fully enjoy the tranquility here.

The untouched nature reserve of the Cantal Mountains is one of the five areas that make up the Auvergne Volcanic Regional Nature Park. In fact, they are the remains of one large stratovolcano, the largest in Europe, which is still visible on the surface.
The Cantal Mountains are an extraordinary area. It is a sparsely populated region with extensive meadows. Numerous rivers find their way to eventually flow into one of the many lakes.
The Puy Mary is one of the highest mountains in the Cantal Mountains in the Massif Central. The top is located at an altitude of 1783 meters. The summit is accessible from Pas de Peyrol, the highest mountain pass in the Massif Central.
2
Routes
482.35
Kilometers
9.89
Hours
View route collection Short trip to the French Ardennes
About this route collection
This route collection takes you from Alken in the Belgian Limburg to the French Ardennes and back. You will not only pass the region around Bouillon, but follow the Semois and the Maas for a very long part downstream. You can expect not only pleasant road surfaces, but also both super long and nicely spiced curves.

The first route takes you to Monthermé, a village in the French Ardennes, located along the Meuse. You will get to know this river very well in this collection. Just like the aforementioned Semois, by the way, a Walloon river that flows into the Meuse at Monthermé, from where it flows back into Belgium, together with the Meuse. Both the first and second routes largely run along and over these two important rivers.

In the loop of the first route you will see - at least if you have an eye for something other than the great motor playground you ended up in - the town of Bouillon, which is quite important in crusades. The location of the town is also special, almost completely surrounded by a meander of the Semois.
After a possible visit to the town, you meander along with the Semois into France to Monthermé, where the Semois surrenders in the arms of the Meuse.

Possibly you can spend the night in hotel 'Les Boucles de Meuse', a fairly simple hotel where you can also enjoy dinner.

The day after, you take a very cozy 'colletje' before descending to the Maas. The route then follows the Maas over a length of 174 km. You will cross the river up to 10 times on this ride while flirting with its banks.
Every now and then a dodge is made to enjoy some nice curves. Most of these side jumps are also referred to by Michelin as 'green', so particularly beautiful roads.
Pay attention to crossing game when you drive through the woods. The game also really likes the forests and there are better ways to get a wild boar on your plate than to hit it with your front wheel.

In the second route you can not only enjoy the Maas, but you also pass three cities that are worth mentioning. Givet in France with its imposing fortress-ruin on top of the mountain, Dinant with its famous rocky point and Citadel and finally Namur with its fortress. The proof that the Maas was also a highly valued terrain in the past that was not given to the enemy without a fight. Even the great (?) Napoleon is not foreign to this region.

But even if you are not interested in the history of the region and / or in the many castles that will cross your path, this 2-day route collection is an absolute must in terms of road quality, route variation (short, firm and sometimes tough bends , long open roads, sloping forest roads and smooth asphalt, ...) and landscape views.
Very pleasant, even impressive scenes pass by your wheels. And without exaggeration, I dare to compare its quality with some of the most beautiful foreign routes in the Black Forest, Eifel and Sauerland.
Although nature here also shows its rough side through some solid rock formations along the road.

Perhaps you - just like us - will be deeply impressed by the region and both journeys. If so, please let us know. In any case, we hope that you will enjoy these 5 star rides as much as we did, which - in a two-day period - are suitable for every type of rider.
3
Routes
759.29
Kilometers
15.76
Hours
View route collection Saarland at its best
About this route collection
Saarland is not very well known among motorcyclists and that is unjustified. It is a separate federal state from Germany, bordering France at Alsace (also known as the Lorraine) and North Vosges and Luxembourg. Not far away and still a lot to do. The problem, I think, is that the area is partly industrial and partly strongly shaped by the eternal struggle between France and Germany.

The landscape, culture and roads are very rewarding. There is a lot of natural beauty to see and experience, such as a tree crown walking path. Idar-Oberstein and its surroundings are also very worthwhile, especially because of the gems that are excavated here. The Saarschleife is famous: a large round bend in the Saar that you can view from above: spectacular! Saarburg is nearby: a historic city with a castle, a deep river and a nice center. Touristy. Then there is Sarreguemines, formally now French, but on the border with Germany. Also a very beautiful town with a lot of history. Saarbrücken is less beautiful, but also worth a visit.

If you are looking for (war) culture, you can indulge yourself here. Many remains can be found from the Middle Ages (castles, ruins, city gates), from the First World War (Ligne Maginot, which was built between the two world wars) and from the Second World War (especially many honorary cemeteries and monuments).

The cooking culture here is famous for its flammkuchen: a kind of thin pizza with a lot of meat and cheese on it. Enough fat to keep you going for the rest of the day ...

Industry is also worth seeing. At Völklingen, an old iron smelter has been transformed into a cultural center with many performances and exhibitions. In the vicinity there are mining museums on both the German and French sides.

These three routes take you everywhere, except the Saarscheilfe and Saarburg. You can easily visit it on the way there (or back).

The routes start at the Hotel Mühlenthal, Bachtalstraße 214, 66773 Schwalbach. A nice little family hotel in a quiet place not too far from Saarlouis.

Lots of fun!
4
Routes
835.54
Kilometers
17.73
Hours
View route collection Four great tours from Lusseray
About this route collection
These tours depart from the holiday home in Lusseray in Poitou-Charentes. This region in the west of France consists of four different departments, namely Charente, Charente-Maritime, Deux-Sèvres and Vienne. Each of these 4 departments is visited.
Nature is varied. Vast landscapes, forest areas, coastlines and wetlands. The many sunflower and grain fields stretch over the rolling hills. At the very heart of the Cognac region you will see endless vineyards dotted with white limestone. But also historically and culturally you can still find many traces of a rich past that dates back to Roman times.
7
Routes
2109.76
Kilometers
42.89
Hours
View route collection Tour around Switzerland
About this route collection
The Alps, a mountain range in Europe stretching from the French Mediterranean coast in the southwest to the Pannonian plain in the east, almost always guarantee beautiful routes. It can hardly be boring there. The many passes, views and variations in the landscape make the Alps a true motorcycle paradise.
Switzerland is central to this paradise and is surrounded on all sides by countries where it is beautiful steering on fantastic roads.
The 7 routes of this collection lead you around Switzerland, of course this beautiful country itself is also visited. You will pass through beautiful areas such as the Alps, the French and Swiss Jura and the Black Forest.

A few attractions are discussed per route in the review. These often tell something about the history of the area in which you are driving. So educational. Many places have also been indicated where you can find some entertainment, such as a toboggan run. You are completely free to visit these sights, you can of course also determine your own interesting points.
But the most important thing you've probably traveled to this area for is simply driving. And as mentioned above, you are in a true motorcycle paradise where the steering is fantastic!

Each route ends at a hotel (except the last one which ends at the train station in Innsbruck). It is of course not an obligation to use these hotels, you can always find another place to stay in the area, you are completely free. However, my experience is that they are all simple but good hotels for a very reasonable price. They are known and can be booked via booking.com.

The routes of these collections:

R01 - Innsbruck to Chiuro, 301km
R02 - Chiuro to Brig, 279km
R03 - Brig to Bourg Saint Maurice, 288km
R04 - Bourg St Maurice to St Etienne de Cuines, 307km
R05 - St Etienne de Cuines to Metabief, 295km
R06 - Metabief to Fuerstenberg, 305km
R07 - Fuerstenberg to Innsbruck, 335km

Have fun riding these routes!
3
Routes
617.16
Kilometers
11.37
Hours
View route collection 3 day mini break through Brittany and Normandy
About this route collection
The overnight ferry crossing from Plymouth to Roscoff is a relaxing way to begin your 3 days of sightseeing in North West France. Touring the coasts and countryside of Brittany and Normandy, you'll discover beautiful sandy beaches, tiny fishing ports, bustling market towns and iconic and historical sites. Don't forget to sample Brittany's renowned seafood and delicious sweet and savoury pancakes, or Normandy cider and of course their 'hard to say no to' apple brandy, Calvados .
Day 1 takes you along the beautiful and rugged coast to Mont St Michel, a World Heritage site, visible for miles around. This is a wonderful place at any time of year, although be prepared for it to be very busy in summer. Your first hotel is just 30 minutes further along the coast at Hôtel Ibis Avranches Baie du Mont Saint-Michel. Other hotels are nearby and links for this hotel and your second night at Port en Bessin are in the individual route reviews.
Day 2 takes you first to Bayeux, world famous for its astonishing tapestry depicting the Norman Conquest of England in 1066, remarkable as a work of art and important as a source for 11th-century history. Bayeux also has a picturesque old quarter, WW2 museum and cathedral worth visiting (park motorcycles next to cathedral).
Then you can take in the sobering atmosphere at Pegasus Bridge, liberated by the British 6th Airborne Division glider unit, a full size replica of a Horsa glider shown in the picture above is on display, and the tale of the men it transported gives you a remarkable insight into the scale, ferocity and poignancy of Operation Overlord. Arromanches' Mulberry Harbour (Port Winston) and the gun emplacements dotted along the coast that you'll visit are reminders of the combats that took place here over 70 years ago. A great night is guaranteed at your second hotel in the fishing port of Port en Bessin where you can sample local cider (cidre) some of the freshest seafood available, fine wine, and finish off with some local calvados.
Day 3 tells the American story of D-Day with visits to Omaha and Utah beaches, various museums and the first town in France to be liberated during operation Overlord - Sainte-Mère-Eglise where an effigy of private John Steele dangles by his parachute from the church steeple.
Your return to the UK is via Cherbourg, to either Poole or Plymouth depending on the time of year, most sailings are around 17:00 hrs. Details from Brittany Ferries can be found in the link in the first review.
This is a great mini tour that'll give you a good glimpse of what this part of northern France has to offer and will leave you wanting to return.
24
Routes
4632.84
Kilometers
88.98
Hours
View route collection 24 Magnificent routes in France
About this route collection
That France is one of the most beautiful and best touring countries is beyond doubt. It offers an incredibly varied landscape with good roads and a pleasant climate. It is not for nothing that you see so many motorcyclists there. My previous collection of 25 routes in France (25 Magnificent routes in France) were based on the route descriptions from the Motorbike Guide France part 1 made by Bert Loorbach.

This collection of 24 routes comes from Motortourgids France part 2. With this collection a difference has been made between approach routes and motorcycle tours in a certain area. The approach routes can also be used in combination with the routes from Motortourgids France part 1

The routes are sometimes slightly adjusted based on the tips that Bert Loorbach gives in his description, or because of a different place to spend the night, or to achieve the minimum length of 2 hours for the MRA Library. For each route there is a more detailed description in the review, including options for accommodation or places of interest along the way, which are also indicated with a POI and, if possible, with a short description.

Two or more routes have been made for a number of areas, such as Burgundy, Auvergne, The Alps, Tarn and Cévennen and Nord-Pas de Calais. These routes can be nicely combined in a multi-day trip.
10
Routes
3251.6
Kilometers
61.77
Hours
View route collection 11 day trip from the Netherlands
About this route collection
8 countries in 11 days; The Netherlands, Germany, Austria, Italy, Switzerland, France, Luxembourg and Belgium. This route collections consists of 10 routes that I have driven with friends in the summer of 2019.

The start is in Geldermalsen Netherlands, the first 7 days you drive through the Netherlands, Germany, Austria, Italy, Switzerland, France and a piece of Luxembourg with overnight stays in hotels.

The last three days you stay in Barweiler (D) in the Eifel and you drive two beautiful tours through the Eifel, Luxembourg and parts of the Belgian Ardennes.

There is no highway in the routes, only beautiful provincial and country roads, many beautiful passes with beautiful panoramas.

Be sure to check whether the passes are open before you leave.

These are routes for experienced drivers.
25
Routes
4126.72
Kilometers
86.52
Hours
View route collection 25 Magnificent routes in France
About this route collection
This MRA route collection contains 25 beautiful motorcycle routes in different parts of France, such as the Ardennes, Alsace, Vercors, the Drôme, the Ardèche, Cote d'Azure, Gorges du Verdon, the Ariège, the Dordogne and Brittany.

The routes have been carefully made by Bert Loorbach, who himself is an enthusiastic motorcyclist. He lived in France for a year and a half and during that time he focused on mapping the unknown and beautiful roads of France especially for motorcyclists.

The routes are bundled in the Motortourgids France part 1 of Kosmos publishing house and now also available in MyRouteApp.

I have taken over the routes in MRA and sometimes adjusted something to make them even more interesting for the motorcyclist.
24
Routes
7726.89
Kilometers
162.75
Hours
View route collection The 24 Most Beautiful Alps Routes
About this route collection
The Alps, the Alps are a mountain range in Europe, stretching from the French Mediterranean coast in the southwest to the Pannonian plain in the east. The area of the mountains is more than 200,000 km².

In other words Passes and Mountain roads!

Driving through the mountains is great! Certainly over the mountain passes with hairpin bends and narrow winding roads. Every turn a different view where you can enjoy. There are many beautiful mountain passes in the Alps.

A selection that is also processed in these routes:
The Stleviopas:
The Stelvio Pass, also known as Passo dello Stelvio, is best known for the stage in the Giro d'Italia. In cycling, this pass is seen as one of the toughest tests due to the length and the difference in height. The Stelviopas reaches a maximum height of 2758 meters and is therefore one of the highest in the Alps. Bormio and Prato Allo Stelvio are connected to the pass. The pass is closed in winter due to heavy snowfall.

The Reschen pass:
The Reschen Pass, also known as Passo di Resia, connects the Austrian state of Tyrol with the Italian province of South Tyrol. The pass reaches a maximum height of 1504 meters and has been one of the most important north-south connections in the Alps in recent centuries. The pass was used well before Roman times. Along the way you pass multiple highlights and historical remains. One of the highlights is the Reschensee. This lake was created after the construction of the dam and has completely drained the village of Graun. The only thing that is reminded of this is the clock tower in the middle of the lake.

Col du Galibier:
The French mountain pass Col du Galibier connects the towns of Saint-Michel-de-Maurienne and Briançon via the Col du Lautaret in the south and the Col du Télégraphe in the north. The mountain pass is part of the Tour de France and very feared, due to the fact that it is only accessible via the other two mountain passes. The pass reaches a maximum height of 2646 meters. From there you can take a walk to the viewpoint at 2704 meters. You can admire the peaks of the Grand Galibier, Mont Blanc and La Meije, among others.

The Grossglockner High Alpine Road:
With a height of 3798 meters, the Grossglockner is the highest mountain in Austria. In order to optimally enjoy this impressive mountain, you can drive along the Grossglockner High Alpine Road and associated pass. The route starts from Bruck am Grossglockner and ends in Heiligenblut. You can of course drive both ways. The pass reaches a maximum height of 2504 meters and is closed in winter due to the heavy snowfall. Along the way you pass several stops with fun activities, information points, mountain huts and viewpoints. We recommend a visit to the Kaiser-Franz-Josefs-Höhe and Pasterzen glacier.

The Col d'Izoard:
Just like the Col du Galibier, the Col d'Izoard is also part of a stage of the Tour de France. The mountain pass connects Briançon with the valley of the Guil river. The pass lies partly in the Regional Natural Park of Queyras and reaches a maximum height of 2360 meters. The bare and rocky landscape is special about the Col d'Izoard. It sometimes seems as if you are driving over the moon by car! Along the way you can stop at several points to enjoy the beautiful view.

The Bernina pass:
The Bernina Express is one of the most famous rail trains in Switzerland and the Alps. The route is beautiful and partly included on the UNESCO World Heritage List. Parallel to the railway line is the Bernina Pass, which connects the Veltlindal with the Egandin Valley. This beautiful Alpine road has a total length of 56 kilometers and reaches a maximum height of 2328 meters. Along the way you can enjoy views of the Morteratsch Glacier, among other things.

The Sella pass:
The Sella pass, also known as Passo di Sella, takes you on one of the most impressive mountain ranges of the Dolomites: the Sella massif. The pass connects Valle di Fassa with Val Gardena and reaches a maximum height of 2236 meters. At this altitude is also the border of the Italian provinces of Trentino and Bolzano. Along the way you can enjoy the view of this spectacular mountain world. Admire, for example, the three peaks of the Sasso Lungo mountain range, the Sella mountain range or the peaks of the Marmolada. You can also drive the Sella pass in combination with the Gardena pass, Pordoi pass and Campolongo pass.

The Grimsel pass:
The Grimsel Pass connects Goms in Wallis with the Halis Valley in the Bernese Oberland. The pass reaches a maximum height of 2165 meters and is closed in winter due to snowfall. The mountain pass has played an important role in trade between Switzerland and Italy over the centuries. Now it is mainly the reservoirs that have an important function. These are used for the generation of electricity. The landscape you drive through is rugged, rocky and impressive. On top of the pass is a hotel and a restaurant with a special marmot park. The Dodensee (Totensee) is also located here. This lake owes its name to the many fallen soldiers in the time of Napoleon.

The Gotthard pass:
The Gotthard pass, also called Passo del San Gottardo and Sint-Gotthard, connects the Swiss towns of Airolo and Andermatt. The mountain pass and associated tunnel are best known among holidaymakers who travel from Switzerland to Italy. But where the majority opts for the tunnel, it is precisely the pass that really makes the holiday complete. The Gotthard pass has a length of approximately 26 kilometers and reaches a maximum height of 2106 meters. The route is beautiful and takes you past old villages and beautiful views.

The Silvretta High Alpine Road and Silvretta Pass:
The Paznaun Valley in Tyrol and the Montafon in Vorarlberg are connected by the Silvretta Hochalpenstraße. The route has a length of 22.3 kilometers and leads from Galtür to Partenen in 34 hairpin bends, via the 2032 meter high Bielerhöhe. At this point is also the Silvrettasee, where you can walk. The pass is closed in winter due to snowfall.

The Simplon pass:
Just like the Gotthard pass, many holidaymakers travel the Simplon pass every year. This mountain pass connects the Rhone valley in the Valais canton with the Valle d'Ossola in Piedmont. The pass is open all year round and reaches a maximum height of 2005 meters. Along the way you pass a number of buildings, including the famous Simplon-Hospiz from 1825. The hospiz is managed by the monks of St. Bernard. From the highest point on the pass all kinds of walking routes are possible and you will also come across a hotel where you can spend the night.

The Gerlospas:
The Gerlos Pass connects the Salzachtal in the Salzburgerland with the Zillertal in Tyrol. The pass is part of the Gerlos Alpenstraße and runs right through the Hohe Tauern National Park. Along the way you can enjoy beautiful views of the surroundings. The pass has a length of 12 kilometers and reaches a maximum height of 1531 meters. A ride on the Gerlos Pass is ideal to combine with a visit to the Krimmler Wasserfälle.

The Great St. Bernhard Pass:
The Great St. Bernhard Pass, better known as the Col du Grand Saint Bernard, connects the Italian province of Valle d'Aosta with the Swiss canton of Valais. The pass is one of the highest in Switzerland and reaches a maximum height of 2469 meters. Just like a number of other mountain passes in this list, the Great St. Bernhard Pass has been used for centuries as a connecting road. The pass has its name to think of the St. Bernard dogs who used to help stranded travelers with the monks. The pass is closed in winter.

The Timmelsjoch Hochalpenstrasse:
The Timmelsjoch Hochalpenstrasse connects the towns of Sölden in the Ötztal and Meran in South Tyrol. Toll must be paid on the route Hochgurgl - Moos. Via a mountain road with around 60 hairpin bends you drive through a beautiful mountain world. With the Timmelsjoch Experience you can find out more about the history, the road and the surroundings from various stations. You can also visit the Top Mountain Crosspoint museum.

Col de l'Iséran:
With a maximum pass height of 2770 meters, the Col l'Iséran is one of the highest mountain passes in the Alps. The pass connects Bourg-Saint-Maurice with Bonneval-sur-Arc. You pass Val-d'Isère and a side valley of the Maurienne, which is located entirely in the Vanoise National Park, along a road full of hairpin bends. You can spot animals such as marmots and chamois and there is also a restaurant with a chapel on top of the pass.

The Gaviapas:
The Gaviapass (Italian Passo di Gavia) is a mountain pass in the Italian Alps, in the Lombardy region.
It is one of the highest pass roads in Europe. The road leads right through the unspoilt Stelvio National Park. The road was laid in the First World War for the supply of Italian soldiers who fought in the Italian-Austrian border area. The pass height is one of the most beautiful in the Alps. Here lies the large Lago Bianco with, to the north, the mountain San Matteo (3684 meters). The Lago Nero is slightly lower on the south side of the pass. The Adamello mountain group determines the view here. Many well-marked walks have been plotted in the area. During the winter the pass is closed due to the enormous snowfall. The pass is often closed until May and June due to the large amount of snow.


Promoter has made a selection of the 24 Most Beautiful Alps routes they have plotted in recent years.

The routes continue through:
France
Austria
Switzerland
Italy

The most beautiful roads, the most beautiful views, the most beautiful viewpoints. The highest mountains, the fastest descents, hairpin bend after hairpin bend, you name it you can't get enough.

Are you going on holiday in this region, take advantage of it, ALL routes in this collection have been checked and made the same for TomTom, Garmin and MyRoute-app Navigation by a RouteRpert MyRoute-app.

Have fun with this collection and while driving one of these routes. Enjoy all the beauty that the Alps and the Dolomites have to offer. Click on “View route” to read the review of the chosen route.

I would like to hear your findings about the route (s).


4
Routes
892.49
Kilometers
23.78
Hours
Show region map
Corsica Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Corsica", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Corsica (; Corsican: [ˈkorsiɡa], Italian: [ˈkɔrsika]; French: Corse, [kɔʁs] (listen)) is an island in the Mediterranean Sea and politically one of the 18 regions of France. It is the fourth-largest island in the Mediterranean Sea. It lies southeast of the French mainland, west of the Italian Peninsula, and immediately north of the Italian island of Sardinia, the land mass nearest to it. A single chain of mountains makes up two-thirds of the island. The island is a territorial collectivity of France. The regional capital is Ajaccio. Although the region is divided into two administrative departments, Haute-Corse and Corse-du-Sud, their respective regional and departmental territorial collectivities were merged on 1 January 2018 to form the single territorial collectivity of Corsica. As such, Corsica enjoys a greater degree of autonomy than other French regional collectivities, for example the Corsican Assembly is permitted to exercise limited executive powers. Corsica’s second-largest town is Bastia, the prefecture city of Haute-Corse. Corsica was ruled by the Republic of Genoa from 1284 to 1755, when it became a self-proclaimed Italian-speaking Republic. In 1768, Genoa officially ceded it to Louis XV of France as part of a pledge for debts and in 1769 France forcibly annexed it. Napoleon Bonaparte was a native Corsican, born that same year in Ajaccio, and his ancestral home, Maison Bonaparte, is today a significant visitor attraction and museum. Because of Corsica's historical ties to the Italian peninsula, the island retains many Italian cultural elements, and the native tongue is recognized as a regional language by the French government.
1
Routes
379.69
Kilometers
6.8
Hours
Show region map
Navarra Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Navarra", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Navarre (English: ; Spanish: Navarra [naˈβara]; Basque: Nafarroa [nafaro.a]; Occitan: Navarra [naˈbaʀɔ]), officially the Chartered Community of Navarre (Spanish: Comunidad Foral de Navarra [komuniˈðað foˈɾal de naˈβara]; Basque: Nafarroako Foru Komunitatea [nafaro.ako foɾu komunitate.a]), is an autonomous community and province in northern Spain, bordering the Basque Autonomous Community, La Rioja, and Aragon in Spain and Nouvelle-Aquitaine in France. The capital city is Pamplona (or Iruñea in Basque). The best-known event in Navarre is the San Fermín festival in July held in Pamplona. Navarre is in the transition between Green Spain and semi-arid interior areas, causing a vast difference of landscapes between various parts of the region. The transition also renders a highly variable climate, with cooler spells and heat waves mixing in summer. Winters are mild for the latitude. Navarre is one of the historic Basque districts, with its Basque features conspicuous in the north, while virtually absent on the southern fringes.
23
Routes
5306.05
Kilometers
118.59
Hours
Show region map
Hauts de France Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Hauts de France", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Hauts-de-France (French: [o.də.fʁɑ̃s]; Picard: Heuts-d'Franche, lit. 'Heights of France') is the northernmost region of France, created by the territorial reform of French Regions in 2014, from a merger of Nord-Pas-de-Calais and Picardy. Its capital is Lille. The new region came into existence on 1 January 2016, after the regional elections in December 2015. France's Conseil d'État approved Hauts-de-France as the name of the region on 28 September 2016, effective 30 September 2016.With 6,009,976 inhabitants (as of 1 January 2015) and a population density of 189 inhabitants/km2, it is the third most populous region in France and the second most densely populated in metropolitan France after its southern neighbour Île-de-France.
17
Routes
4764.22
Kilometers
91.45
Hours
Show region map
Nouvelle Aquitaine Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Nouvelle Aquitaine", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Nouvelle-Aquitaine (; French: [nuvɛl akitɛn], "New Aquitania" ; Occitan: Nòva Aquitània [ˈnɔβo akiˈtanjo], or Novèla Aquitània [nuˈβɛlo akiˈtanjo]; Basque: Akitania Berria; Poitevin-Saintongeais: Novéle-Aguiéne) is the largest administrative region in France, spanning the west and southwest of the mainland. The region was created by the territorial reform of French Regions in 2014 through the merger of three regions: Aquitaine, Limousin and Poitou-Charentes. It covers 84,036 km2 (32,446 sq mi) – or ​1⁄8 of the country – and has 5,956,978 inhabitants (municipal population on 1 January 2017).. The new region was established on 1 January 2016, following the regional elections in December 2015.It is the largest region in France by area, with a territory slightly larger than that of Austria; even French Guiana is smaller. Its largest city, Bordeaux, together with its suburbs and satellite cities, forms the 7th-largest metropolitan area of France, with 850,000 inhabitants. The region has 25 major urban areas, among which the most important after Bordeaux are Bayonne (288,000 inhabitants), Limoges (283,000), Poitiers (255,000), Pau (241,000), and La Rochelle (206,000), as well as 11 major clusters. The growth of its population, particularly marked on the coast, makes this one of the most attractive areas economically in France; the new region outperforms the Île-de-France and Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur in demographic dynamism. After Île-de-France, New Aquitaine is the premier French region in research and innovation, with five universities (Bordeaux, La Rochelle, Limoges, Poitiers and Pau) and several Grandes Ecoles. The agricultural region of Europe with the greatest turnover, it is the French region with the most tourism jobs, as it has three of the four historic resorts on the French Atlantic coast: (Arcachon, Biarritz and Royan), as well as several ski resorts (e.g. Gourette), and is the fifth French region for business creation (all sectors). Its economy is based on agriculture and viticulture (vineyards of Bordeaux and Cognac), tourism, a powerful aerospace industry, digital economy and design, parachemical and pharmaceutical industries, financial sector (Niort is the fourth-largest financial center in the nation, specialising in mutual insurance companies), and industrial ceramics (Limoges). The new region includes major parts of Southern France ("Midi de la France"), marked by Basque, Occitan, Poitevin and Saintongeais cultures. Historically, it is the "indirect successor" to medieval Aquitaine, and extends over a large part of the former Duchy of Eleanor of Aquitaine.
1
Routes
421.38
Kilometers
8.65
Hours
Show region map
Basel Landschaft Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Basel Landschaft", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The canton of Basel-Landschaft (; German: Kanton Basel-Landschaft , pronounced [ˈkɑnton ˌbaːzl̩ˈlantʃaft]; English: canton of Basel-Country; French: canton de Bâle-Campagne, pronounced [kɑ̃tɔ̃ də bɑl kɑ̃paɲ]; Italian: Cantone di Basilea Campagna, pronounced [kanˈtone di baˈzile.a kamˈpaɲɲa]; informally: Baselland, Baselbiet) is one of the 26 cantons of Switzerland. The capital is Liestal. It shares borders with the Swiss cantons of Basel-Stadt, Solothurn, Jura and Aargau, and with the French région of Grand Est and the German state of Baden-Württemberg.
23
Routes
6072.05
Kilometers
121.47
Hours
Show region map
Occitanie Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Occitanie", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Occitanie (French pronunciation: [ɔksitaˈni] (listen); Occitan: Occitània [utsiˈtanjɔ]; Catalan: Occitània [uksiˈtaniə]), Occitany or Occitania () is the southernmost administrative region of metropolitan France excluding Corsica, created on 1 January 2016 from the former regions of Languedoc-Roussillon and Midi-Pyrénées. The Conseil d'État approved Occitanie as the new name of the region on 28 September 2016, coming into effect on 30 September 2016.The modern administrative region is named after the larger cultural and historical region of Occitania, which corresponds with the southern third of France. The region Occitanie as it is today covers a territory similar to that ruled by the Counts of Toulouse in the 12th and 13th centuries. The banner of arms of the Counts of Toulouse, known colloquially as the Occitan cross, is used by the modern region and is also a popular cultural symbol.
4
Routes
1104.33
Kilometers
19.34
Hours
Show region map
Centre Val de Loire Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Centre Val de Loire", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Centre-Val de Loire (, , French pronunciation: ​[sɑ̃tʁə val də lwaʁ], lit. 'Centre-Loire Valley') or Centre Region (French: Région Centre, pronounced [ʁeʒjɔ̃ sɑ̃tʁ]), as it was known until 2015, is one of the 18 administrative regions of France. It straddles the middle Loire Valley in the interior of the country. The administrative capital is Orléans.
1
Routes
195.74
Kilometers
4.09
Hours
Show region map
Lede France Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Lede France", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Lede may refer to:
14
Routes
4060.51
Kilometers
75.45
Hours
Show region map
Wallonie Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Wallonie", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Wallonia (; French: Wallonie [walɔni]; German: Wallonien [vaˈloːni̯ən] (listen) or Wallonie [valoˈniː]; Dutch: Wallonië [ʋɑˈloːnijə] (listen)) (Walloon Region (French: Région wallonne; German: Wallonische Region; Dutch: Waals gewest), in the Belgian Constitution) is one of the three Regions of Belgium—alongside Flanders and Brussels. Covering the southern portion of the country, Wallonia is primarily French-speaking, and accounts for 55% of Belgium's territory, but only a third of its population. The Walloon Region was not merged with the French Community of Belgium, which is the political entity responsible for matters related mainly to culture and education, because the French Community of Belgium encompasses both Wallonia and the predominantly Francophone Brussels-Capital Region. There is a German-speaking minority in eastern Wallonia, resulting from the annexation of three cantons previously part of the German Empire at the conclusion of World War I. This community represents less than 1% of the Belgian population. It forms the German-speaking Community of Belgium, which has its own government and parliament for culture-related issues. During the industrial revolution, Wallonia was second only to the United Kingdom in industrialization, capitalizing on its extensive deposits of coal and iron. This brought the region wealth, and from the beginning of the 19th to the middle of the 20th century, Wallonia was the more prosperous half of Belgium. Since World War II, the importance of heavy industry has greatly diminished, and the Flemish Region has exceeded Wallonia in wealth as Wallonia has declined economically. Wallonia now suffers from high unemployment and has a significantly lower GDP per capita than Flanders. The economic inequalities and linguistic divide between the two are major sources of political conflicts in Belgium and a major factor in Flemish separatism. The capital of Wallonia is Namur, and the most populous city is Liège. Most of Wallonia's major cities and two-thirds of its population lie along the east-west aligned Sambre and Meuse valley, the former industrial backbone of Belgium. To the north of this valley, Wallonia lies on the Central Belgian Plateau, which, like Flanders, is a relatively flat and agriculturally fertile area. The south and southeast of Wallonia is made up of the Ardennes, an expanse of forested highland that is less densely populated. Wallonia borders Flanders and the Netherlands (the province of Limburg) in the north, France (Grand Est and Hauts-de-France) to the south and west, and Germany (North Rhine-Westphalia and Rhineland-Palatinate) and Luxembourg (Capellen, Clervaux, Esch-sur-Alzette, Redange and Wiltz) to the east. Wallonia has been a member of the Organisation Internationale de la Francophonie since 1980.
1
Routes
305.03
Kilometers
5.25
Hours
Show region map
Jura Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Jura", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Jura may refer to:
12
Routes
2864.29
Kilometers
55.24
Hours
Show region map
Bourgogne Franche Comte Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Bourgogne Franche Comte", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Bourgogne-Franche-Comté (French: [buʁɡɔɲ fʁɑ̃ʃ kɔ̃te] (listen); lit. 'Burgundy-Free County'), sometimes abbreviated BFC, is a region in the east of France created by the territorial reform of French Regions in 2014, from a merger of Burgundy and Franche-Comté. The new region came into existence on 1 January 2016, after the regional elections of December 2015, electing 100 members to the regional council of Bourgogne-Franche-Comté.The region covers an area of 47,783 km2 (18,449 sq mi); it had a population of 2,811,423 in 2017.
39
Routes
9233.42
Kilometers
186
Hours
Show region map
Auvergne Rhone Alpes Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Auvergne Rhone Alpes", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes (ARA; French: [ovɛʁɲ ʁon‿alp] (listen); Francoprovençal: Ôvèrgne-Rôno-Ârpes; Occitan: Auvèrnhe Ròse Aups; Italian: Alvernia-Rodano-Alpi) is a region in southeast-central France created by the territorial reform of French Regions in 2015; it resulted from the merger of Auvergne and Rhône-Alpes. The new region came into effect on 1 January 2016, after the regional elections in December 2015.The region covers an area of 69,711 km2 (26,916 sq mi), making it the third largest in metropolitan France, and has a population of 7,948,287, second only to Île-de-France. It consists of 12 departments and one territorial collectivity. Lyon is the chef-lieu of the region. This new region combines diverse geographical, sociological, economic, and cultural regions, which was already true of Rhône-Alpes, as well as Auvergne, to a lesser extent. While the old Rhône-Alpes and Auvergne regions each enjoyed a unity defined by axes of communication and the pull of their respective metropoles, the new combination is heterogeneous, and sustained lively opposition from some local officials after its creation.
4
Routes
2071.16
Kilometers
39.85
Hours
Show region map
Aragn Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Aragn", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
NGC 2985 is a spiral galaxy located in the constellation Ursa Major. It is located at a distance of circa 70 million light years from Earth, which, given its apparent dimensions, means that NGC 2985 is about 95,000 light years across. It was discovered by William Herschel on April 3, 1785.The galaxy is seen with an inclination of 37 degrees. The galaxy has a bright nucleus from which emanate multiple tightly wound spiral fragments. Numerous blue knots are visible at the galactic disk. At the outer part of the galaxy lies a massive spiral arm that forms a pseudoring that encircles the galaxy. The inner part of the galaxy, where active star formation has been observed, has been found to be unstable, contrary to the outer stable one. It has been suggested that the presence of molecular clouds accounts for the instability of the region.The nucleus of NGC 2985 is active, and based on its spectrum has been categorised as a LINER. The most accepted theory for the activity source is the presence of an accretion disk around a supermassive black hole. The mass of the supermassive black hole at the centre of NGC 2985 is estimated to be 160 million (108.2) M☉, based on stellar velocity dispersion. The velocity dispersion is anisotropic, and changes with the azimuth. The rotational speed of the galaxy at its effective radius is 222.9 ± 31.2 km/s.NGC 2985 is the brightest member of a galaxy group known as the NGC 2985 group. Other members of the group include NGC 3027, 25 arcminutes away. Other nearby galaxies include NGC 3252, and NGC 3403.
6
Routes
1588.91
Kilometers
32.52
Hours
Show region map
Normandi Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Normandi", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Normandy (; French: Normandie [nɔʁmɑ̃di] (listen); Norman: Normaundie; from Old French Normanz, plural of Normant, originally from the word for "northman" in several Scandinavian languages) is the northwesternmost of the 18 regions of France, roughly coextensive with the historical Duchy of Normandy. Normandy is divided into five administrative departments: Calvados, Eure, Manche, Orne, and Seine-Maritime. It covers 30,627 square kilometres (11,825 sq mi), comprising roughly 5% of the territory of metropolitan France. Its population of 3,322,757 accounts for around 5% of the population of France. The inhabitants of Normandy are known as Normans, and the region is the historic homeland of the Norman language. The neighboring regions are Hauts-de-France and Ile-de-France to the east, Centre-Val de Loire to the southeast, Pays de la Loire to the south, and Brittany to the southwest. The capital is Rouen. The historical region of Normandy comprised the present-day region of Normandy, as well as small areas now part of the departments of Mayenne and Sarthe. The Channel Islands (French: Îles Anglo-Normandes) are also historically part of Normandy; they cover 194 km2 and comprise two bailiwicks: Guernsey and Jersey, which are British Crown dependencies over which Queen Elizabeth II reigns as Duke of Normandy.Normandy's name comes from the settlement of the territory by mainly Danish and Swedish Vikings ("Northmen") from the 9th century, and confirmed by treaty in the 10th century between King Charles III of France and the Viking jarl Rollo. For four hundred years following the Norman conquest of England in 1066, Normandy and England were linked by having the same person reign as both Duke of Normandy and King of England.
18
Routes
4681.77
Kilometers
98.94
Hours
Show region map
Provence Alpes Cote d Azur Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Provence Alpes Cote d Azur", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur (French pronunciation: ​[pʁɔvɑ̃s‿alp kot d‿azyʁ]; Occitan: Provença-Aups-Còsta d'Azur, [pɾuˈvɛnso̞ ˈawps ˈkɔsto̞ daˈzyɾ]; Italian: Provenza-Alpi-Costa Azzurra; commonly shortened to PACA; also known as Région Sud) is one of the eighteen administrative regions of France, the far southeastern on the mainland. Its prefecture is Marseille. The region is roughly coterminous with the former French province of Provence, with the addition of the following adjacent areas: the former papal territory of Avignon, known as Comtat Venaissin; the former Sardinian-Piedmontese county of Nice, whose coastline is known in English as the French Riviera and in French as the Côte d'Azur; and the southeastern part of the former French province of Dauphiné, in the French Alps. Previously known by the acronym PACA, the region adopted the name Région Sud as a commercial name or nickname in December 2017. 5,007,977 people live in the region according to the 2015 census. It encompasses six departments in Southeastern France: Alpes-de-Haute-Provence, Alpes-Maritimes, Bouches-du-Rhône, Hautes-Alpes, Var and Vaucluse. It is bounded to the east by the France-Italy border, to the south by the Mediterranean Sea and by the Principality of Monaco, to the north by Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes, and to the west by Occitanie, with the Rhône river marking its westernmost border. The region logotype displays the coat of arms created in the 1990s and which combines the coats of arms of the old provinces making up Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur. The region's economy is the third largest in France, just behind Île-de-France and Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes. Its GDP in 2012 was €142.4 billion (US$183.1 billion) while its per capita GDP was €28,861 ($US 37,121).
5
Routes
879.32
Kilometers
20.29
Hours
Show region map
Bretagne Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Bretagne", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Bretagne may refer to:
4
Routes
1704.48
Kilometers
26.22
Hours
Show region map
Baden Wurttemberg Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Baden Wurttemberg", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Baden-Württemberg (, German: [ˌbaːdn̩ ˈvʏʁtəmbɛʁk] (listen)) is a state in southwest Germany, east of the Rhine, which forms the southern sector of Germany's western border with France. With 11 million inhabitants across a total area of 35,751 km2 (13,804 sq mi), it is the third-largest German state by both area and population. Baden-Württemberg is a parliamentary republic and partly-sovereign federated state. It was formed in 1952 by the merger of Württemberg-Baden, South Baden, and Württemberg-Hohenzollern. (These states had just been artificially created by the Allies after World War II out of the existing traditional states Baden and Württemberg by their separation over different occupation zones.) The largest city in Baden-Württemberg is the state capital of Stuttgart, followed by Karlsruhe and Mannheim. Other cities are Freiburg im Breisgau, Heidelberg, Heilbronn, Pforzheim, Reutlingen, Tübingen, and Ulm. The sobriquet Ländle (a diminutive of the word "Land" in the local Alemannic and Franconian dialects) is sometimes used as a synonym for Baden-Württemberg.
1
Routes
305.03
Kilometers
5.25
Hours
Show region map
Basel Stadt Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Basel Stadt", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The canton of Basel-Stadt (German: Kanton Basel-Stadt , English: canton of Basel-City, French: canton de Bâle-Ville, Italian: Cantone di Basilea Città, Romansh: chantun Basilea-Citad) is one of the 26 cantons of Switzerland, and the smallest of the cantons by area. The city of Basel and the municipalities of Bettingen and Riehen form its territory. Canton of Basle-City is Switzerland's seventh-largest economic centre and has the highest GDP per capita in the country, ahead of the cantons of Zug and Geneva. In terms of value, over 94% of Basel City's goods exports are in the chemical and pharmaceutical sectors. With production facilities located in the neighbouring Schweizerhalle, Basel accounts for 20% of Swiss exports
29
Routes
7913.33
Kilometers
149.59
Hours
Show region map
Grand Est Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Grand Est", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Grand Est ("Great East"; French pronunciation: [ɡʁɑ̃t‿ɛst] (listen); Alsatian: d'r Grossa Oschta; Moselle Franconian/Luxembourgish: de Grouss Osten; Rhine Franconian: Groß Oschte; German: Großer Osten [ˈɡʁoːsɐ ˈɔstn̩]) is an administrative region in northeastern France. It superseded three former administrative regions, Alsace, Champagne-Ardenne, and Lorraine, on 1 January 2016 under the provisional name of Alsace-Champagne-Ardenne-Lorraine (ACAL or, less commonly, ALCA), as a result of territorial reform which had been passed by the French legislature in 2014.The region sits astride three water basins (Seine, Meuse and Rhine), spanning an area of 57,433 km2 (22,175 sq mi), the 5th largest in France, and includes two mountain ranges (Vosges and Ardennes). It shares borders with Belgium, Luxembourg, Germany, and Switzerland, and stands partly within the European Megalopolis. As of 2017, it had a population of 5,549,586 inhabitants. The administrative capital and largest city, by far, is Strasbourg. The East of France has a rich and diverse culture, being situated at a crossroads between the Latin and Germanic worlds which is reflected in the variety of languages spoken there (Alsatian, Champenois, Lorraine Franconian etc.). Most of today's Grand Est region was considered "Eastern" as early as the 8th century, when it constituted the southern part of the Francian territory of Austrasia. The city of Reims (in Champagne), where Frankish king Clovis I had been baptized in 496 AD, would later play a prominent ceremonial role in French monarchical history as the traditional site of the coronation of the kings of France. The Champagne fairs played a significant role in the economy of medieval Europe as well. Alsace and Lorraine thrived in the sphere of influence of the Holy Roman Empire for most of the Middle Ages and Renaissance. The region is home to distinctive traditions (the celebration of Saint Nicholas Day, Christmas markets, or traditions involving the Easter hare in Alsace and Lorraine). Alsace-Moselle are furthermore subject to local law for historical reasons. With a long industrial history as well and its agriculture and tourism (arts, gastronomy, sightseeing etc.), the East of France is one of the top economic producing regions in the country.
1
Routes
173.61
Kilometers
5.08
Hours
Show region map
Monaco Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Monaco", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Monaco ( (listen); French pronunciation: ​[mɔnako]), officially the Principality of Monaco (French: Principauté de Monaco), is a sovereign city-state, and microstate on the French Riviera in Western Europe. It is bordered by France to the north, east and west, and by the Mediterranean Sea to the south. The principality is home to 38,682 residents, of which 9,486 are Monegasque nationals and is widely recognised for being one of the most expensive and wealthiest places in the world. The official language is French, although Monégasque, English and Italian are spoken and understood by a sizeable group.With an area of 2.1 km2 (0.81 sq mi), it is one of the smallest sovereign states in Europe and the second-smallest in the world, after the Vatican City. Its 19,009 inhabitants per square kilometre (49,230/sq mi), make it the most densely-populated sovereign state in the world. Monaco has a land border of 5.47 km (3.40 mi), the world's shortest coastline of approximately 3.83 km (2.38 mi), and a width that varies between 1,700 and 349 m (5,577 and 1,145 ft). The highest point in the country is a narrow pathway named Chemin des Révoires on the slopes of Mont Agel, in the Les Révoires Ward, which is 161 metres (528 feet) above sea level. The principality is about 15 km (9.3 mi) from the state border with Italy. Its most populous Quartier is Monte Carlo and the most populous Ward is Larvotto/Bas Moulins. Through land reclamation, Monaco's land mass has expanded by 20 percent. In 2005, it had an area of only 1.974 km2 (0.762 sq mi). The principality is governed under a form of constitutional monarchy, with Prince Albert II as head of state. Although Prince Albert II is a constitutional monarch, he wields immense political power. The House of Grimaldi has ruled Monaco, with brief interruptions, since 1297. The state's sovereignty was officially recognised by the Franco-Monegasque Treaty of 1861, with Monaco becoming a full United Nations voting member in 1993. Despite Monaco's independence and separate foreign policy, its defence is the responsibility of France. However, Monaco does maintain two small military units. Economic development was spurred in the late 19th century with the opening of the country's first casino, Monte Carlo, and a railway connection to Paris. Since then, Monaco's mild climate, scenery, and gambling facilities have contributed to the principality's status as a tourist destination and recreation centre for the rich. In more recent years, Monaco has become a major banking centre and has sought to diversify its economy into the services sector and small, high-value-added, non-polluting industries. The state has no income tax, low business taxes, and is well known for being a tax haven. Over 30% of the resident population are millionaires, with real estate prices reaching €100,000 ($142,000) per square metre in 2018. Monaco is not formally a part of the European Union (EU), but it participates in certain EU policies, including customs and border controls. Through its relationship with France, Monaco uses the euro as its sole currency (prior to this it used the Monégasque franc). Monaco joined the Council of Europe in 2004, and is a member of the Organisation Internationale de la Francophonie (OIF). It is also the host of the annual street circuit motor race Monaco Grand Prix, one of the original Grands Prix of Formula One and birthplace of Scuderia Ferrari driver Charles Leclerc. The principality has a club football team, AS Monaco, who compete in the French Ligue 1, and have become French champions on multiple occasions. A centre of research into marine conservation, Monaco is home to one of the world's first protected marine habitats, an Oceanographic Museum, and the International Atomic Energy Agency Environment Labs, which is the only marine laboratory in the United Nations structure.
3
Routes
663.45
Kilometers
14.36
Hours
Show region map
Pays de la Loire Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Pays de la Loire", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Pays de la Loire (French: [pe.i də la lwaʁ]; lit. 'Loire Countries' or 'Loire Lands') is one of the 18 regions of France, in the west of the mainland. It is one of the regions created in the 1950s to serve as a zone of influence for its capital, Nantes, one of a handful of "balancing metropolises" (métropoles d'équilibre)¹.
1
Routes
287.58
Kilometers
6.48
Hours
Show region map
Valle d Aosta Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Valle d Aosta", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The Aosta Valley (Italian: Valle d'Aosta [ˈvalle daˈɔsta] (official) or Val d'Aosta (usual); French: Vallée d'Aoste [vale dɔst] (official) or Val d'Aoste (usual); Francoprovençal: Val d'Outa (usual); Walser: Augschtalann or Ougstalland; Piedmontese: Val d'Osta) is a mountainous autonomous region in northwestern Italy. It is bordered by Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes, France, to the west, Valais, Switzerland, to the north, and by Piedmont, Italy, to the south and east. The regional capital is Aosta. Covering an area of 3,263 km2 (1,260 sq mi) and with a population of about 128,000 it is the smallest, least populous, and least densely populated region of Italy. It is the only Italian region that is not subdivided into provinces (the province of Aosta was dissolved in 1945). Provincial administrative functions are provided by the regional government. The region is divided into 74 comuni (French: communes). Italian and French are the official languages, though the native population also speak Valdôtain, a dialect of Franco-Provençal. Italian is spoken as a mother tongue by 77.29% of population, Valdôtain by 17.91%, and French by 1.25%. In 2009, reportedly 50.53% of the population could speak all three languages.
MTG1 18 Roundtrip Carcassonne Gorges de Galamus
26-10-2019
View route
Expert rating:
Countries in this route:
MTG1 03 Gerardmer Lac Blanc Le Hohneck Cernay
27-09-2019
View route
Expert rating:
Countries in this route:
MTG1 04 Gerardmer LaBresse Cornimont LeThillot and roundtrip BallondAlsac
27-09-2019
View route
Expert rating:
Countries in this route:
Rondrit Ieper via Ruisseauville
28-02-2019
View route
Expert rating:
Countries in this route:
MTG1 02 Sedan Mouzon Verdun Commercy Domremy Neufchateau BainsLesBains
27-09-2019
View route
Expert rating:
Countries in this route:
MTG1 06 BainsLesBains LuxeuilLeBains Villersexel Ouhans Ornans MontrealLaCluse
27-09-2019
View route
Expert rating:
Countries in this route:
MTG1 05 Roundtrip Gerardmer Saint Diedes Vosges
27-09-2019
View route
Expert rating:
Countries in this route:
MTG1 17 Roundtrip Foix Tarascon AxLesThermes Ascou Axat Quillan Puivert Lavanet
24-10-2019
View route
Expert rating:
Countries in this route:
MTG1 13 Les Calanques Martigues Marseilles Cassis Toulon Grimaud Cogolin
18-10-2019
View route
Expert rating:
Countries in this route:
Vercors Rundtour von Autrans via Pont en Royans und Combe Laval
19-05-2018
View route
Expert rating:
Countries in this route: