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The prettiest verified routes in France

 
MyRoute-app helps you with planning your dream journey! All routes on the page have been verified by our RouteXperts. De routes are categorized in regions, when you click on 'view region' you will see all verified routes for that region that are free to use.
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37
Amount of active RouteXperts (worldwide)
671
Amount of routes reviewed by RouteXperts (worldwide)
12667
Amount of downloaded routes (worldwide)
35177
Amount of visits (France)
69
Amount of routes verified by RouteXperts (France)
601
Amount of downloaded routes (France)
10
Routes
3142.85
Kilometers
58.11
Hours
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Grand Est Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Grand Est", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Grand Est (French pronunciation: [ɡʁɑ̃t‿ɛst] (listen); English: "Great East"; Alsatian: d'r Grossa Oschta; Moselle Franconian/Luxembourgish: de Grouss Osten; German: Großer Osten), previously Alsace-Champagne-Ardenne-Lorraine (ACAL or less commonly, ALCA), is an administrative region in northeastern France. It superseded three former administrative regions—Alsace, Champagne-Ardenne, and Lorraine—on 1 January 2016, as a result of territorial reform which was passed by the French legislature in 2014. Alsace-Champagne-Ardenne-Lorraine was a provisional name, created by hyphenating the merged regions in alphabetical order; its regional council had to approve a new name for the region by 1 July 2016. France's Conseil d'État approved Grand Est as the new name of the region on 28 September 2016, effective 30 September 2016. The administrative capital and largest city is Strasbourg.
2
Routes
1297.6
Kilometers
25.79
Hours
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Aragn Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Aragn", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
NGC 2985 is a spiral galaxy located in the constellation Ursa Major. It is located at a distance of circa 70 million light years from Earth, which, given its apparent dimensions, means that NGC 2985 is about 95,000 light years across. It was discovered by William Herschel on April 3, 1785.The galaxy is seen with an inclination of 37 degrees. The galaxy has a bright nucleus from which emanate multiple tightly wound spiral fragments. Numerous blue knots are visible at the galactic disk. At the outer part of the galaxy lies a massive spiral arm that forms a pseudoring that encircles the galaxy. The inner part of the galaxy, where active star formation has been observed, has been found to be unstable, contrary to the outer stable one. It has been suggested that the presence of molecular clouds accounts for the instability of the region.The nucleus of NGC 2985 is active, and based on its spectrum has been categorised as a LINER. The most accepted theory for the activity source is the presence of an accretion disk around a supermassive black hole. The mass of the supermassive black hole at the centre of NGC 2985 is estimated to be 160 million (108.2) M☉, based on stellar velocity dispersion. The velocity dispersion is anisotropic, and changes with the azimuth. The rotational speed of the galaxy at its effective radius is 222.9 ± 31.2 km/s.NGC 2985 is the brightest member of a galaxy group known as the NGC 2985 group. Other members of the group include NGC 3027, 25 arcminutes away. Other nearby galaxies include NGC 3252, and NGC 3403.
9
Routes
2578.78
Kilometers
49.41
Hours
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Wallonie Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Wallonie", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Wallonia (; French: Wallonie [walɔni]; German: Wallonien [vaˈloːni̯ən] (listen) or Wallonie [valoˈniː]; Dutch: Wallonië [ʋɑˈloːnijə] (listen); Walloon: Walonreye [walɔnʀɛj]; Luxembourgish: Wallounien [vɑˈləʊ̯niə̯n]) is a region of Belgium. As the southern portion of the country, Wallonia is primarily French-speaking, and accounts for 55% of Belgium's territory, but only a third of its population. The Walloon Region was not merged with the French Community of Belgium, which is the political entity responsible for matters related mainly to culture and education, because the French Community of Belgium encompasses both Wallonia and the majority French-Speaking Brussels-Capital Region. The German-speaking minority in eastern Wallonia results from World War I and the subsequent annexation of three cantons that were initially part of the former German empire. This community represents less than 1% of the Belgian population. It forms the German-speaking Community of Belgium, which has its own government and parliament for culture-related issues. During the industrial revolution, Wallonia was second only to the United Kingdom in industrialization, capitalizing on its extensive deposits of coal and iron. This brought the region wealth, and from the beginning of the 19th to the middle of the 20th century, Wallonia was the more prosperous half of Belgium. Since World War II, the importance of heavy industry has greatly diminished, and the Flemish Region surpassed Wallonia in wealth, as Wallonia declined economically. Wallonia now suffers from high unemployment and has a significantly lower GDP per capita than Flanders. The economic inequalities and linguistic divide between the two are major sources of political conflicts in Belgium and a major factor in Flemish separatism. The capital of Wallonia is Namur, and the most populous city is Charleroi. Most of Wallonia's major cities and two-thirds of its population lie along the Sambre and Meuse valley, the former industrial backbone of Belgium. To the north lies the Central Belgian Plateau, which, like Flanders, is relatively flat and agriculturally fertile. In the southeast lie the Ardennes, hilly and sparsely populated. Wallonia borders Flanders and the Netherlands (Limburg) in the north, France (Grand Est and Hauts-de-France) to the south and west, and Germany (North Rhine-Westphalia and Rhineland-Palatinate) and Luxembourg (Capellen, Clervaux, Esch-sur-Alzette, Redange and Wiltz) to the east. Wallonia has been a member of the Organisation Internationale de la Francophonie since 1980.
4
Routes
892.88
Kilometers
21.56
Hours
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Corsica Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Corsica", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Corsica (, French: Corse [kɔʁs]; Corsican: [ˈkorsiɡa]; Italian: [ˈkɔrsika]) is an island in the Mediterranean Sea and one of the 18 regions of France. It is located southeast of the French mainland and west of the Italian Peninsula, with the nearest land mass being the Italian island of Sardinia to the immediate south. A single chain of mountains makes up two-thirds of the island.While being part of Metropolitan France, Corsica is also designated as a territorial collectivity (collectivité territoriale) by law. As a territorial collectivity, Corsica enjoys a greater degree of autonomy than other French regions; for example, the Corsican Assembly is able to exercise limited executive powers. The island formed a single department until it was split in 1975 into two historical departments: Haute-Corse (Upper Corsica) and Corse-du-Sud (Southern Corsica), with its regional capital in Ajaccio, the prefecture city of Corse-du-Sud. Bastia, the prefecture city of Haute-Corse, is the second largest settlement in Corsica. The two departments, and the region of Corsica, merged again into a single territorial collectivity in 2018. After being ruled by the Republic of Genoa since 1284, Corsica had been briefly an Italian-speaking republic from 1755, until it was officially ceded by the Republic of Genoa to Louis XV as part of a pledge for debts and conquered in 1769. Napoleon Bonaparte was born the same year in Ajaccio, and his ancestral home (Maison Bonaparte) is today a significant visitor attraction and museum. Due to Corsica's historical ties with the Italian peninsula, the island retains many Italian cultural elements, and the Corsican language – closely related to Italian – is recognized as a regional language by the French government.
1
Routes
217.02
Kilometers
5.24
Hours
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Bretagne Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Bretagne", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Bretagne may refer to:
7
Routes
2830
Kilometers
57.15
Hours
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Occitanie Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Occitanie", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Occitanie (French: [ɔksitani] (listen); Occitan: Occitània [utsiˈtanjɔ]; Catalan: Occitània [uksiˈtaniə]) or Occitania is the southernmost administrative region of metropolitan France excluding Corsica, created on 1 January 2016 from the former regions of Languedoc-Roussillon and Midi-Pyrénées. The Conseil d'État approved Occitanie as the new name of the region on 28 September 2016, coming into effect on 30 September 2016.The modern administrative region is named after the cultural and historical region of Occitania, which covers a larger area. The region as it is today covers a territory similar to that ruled by the Counts of Toulouse in the 12th and 13th centuries. The banner of arms of the Counts of Toulouse, known colloquially as the Occitan cross, is used by the modern region and is also a popular cultural symbol.
10
Routes
2867.49
Kilometers
58.04
Hours
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Auvergne Rhone Alpes Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Auvergne Rhone Alpes", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes or ARA (French pronunciation: [ovɛʁɲ ʁon alp] (listen), Arpitan: Ôvèrgne-Rôno-Ârpes, Occitan: Auvèrnhe Ròse Aups, Italian: Alvernia-Rodano-Alpi) is a region in southeast-central France created by the territorial reform of French Regions in 2015; it resulted from the merger of Auvergne and Rhône-Alpes. The new region came into effect on 1 January 2016, after the regional elections in December 2015.The region covers an area of more than 69,711 km2 (26,916 sq mi), making it the third largest in metropolitan France, with a population of 7,877,698, second only to Île-de-France. It consists of 12 departments and one territorial collectivity. Lyon is the chef-lieu of the region. This new region combines diverse geographical, sociological, economic, and cultural regions, which was already true of Rhône-Alpes, as well as Auvergne, to a lesser extent. While the old Rhône-Alpes and Auvergne regions each enjoyed a unity defined by axes of communication and the pull of their repective metropoles, the new combination is heterogeneous, and sustained lively opposition from some local officials after its creation..
20
Routes
4714.53
Kilometers
105.05
Hours
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Hauts de France Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Hauts de France", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Hauts-de-France (French pronunciation: ​[o d(ə) fʁɑ̃s], Dutch: Opper-Frankrijk, meaning "Upper France"), is the northernmost region of France, created by the territorial reform of French Regions in 2014, from a merger of Nord-Pas-de-Calais and Picardy. Its capital is Lille. The new region came into existence on 1 January 2016, after the regional elections in December 2015. France's Conseil d'État approved Hauts-de-France as the name of the region on 28 September 2016, effective 30 September 2016.With 6,009,976 inhabitants (as of January 1, 2015), and a population of 189 inhabitants/km2, it represents the 3rd most populous region in France and the 2nd most densely populated in metropolitan France after its neighbor Île-de-France.
2
Routes
472.51
Kilometers
10.5
Hours
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Pays de la Loire Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Pays de la Loire", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Pays de la Loire (French pronunciation: ​[pe.i də la lwaʁ]; meaning Loire Countries) is one of the 18 regions of France, in the west of the mainland. It is one of the regions created in the 1950s to serve as a zone of influence for its capital, Nantes, one of a handful of so-called "balancing metropolises" (métropoles d'équilibre)¹.
12
Routes
3407.58
Kilometers
71.81
Hours
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Provence Alpes Cote d Azur Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Provence Alpes Cote d Azur", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur (French pronunciation: ​[pʁɔvɑ̃s alp kot dazyʁ]; Occitan: Provença-Aups-Còsta d'Azur; Italian: Provenza-Alpi-Costa Azzurra; Région Sud) is one of the 18 administrative regions of France, the far southeastern on the mainland. Its capital is Marseille. The region is roughly coterminous with the former French province of Provence, with the addition of the following adjacent areas: the former papal territory of Avignon, known as Comtat Venaissin; the former Sardinian-Piedmontese county of Nice, whose coastline is known in English as the French Riviera, and in French as the Côte d'Azur; and the southeastern part of the former French province of Dauphiné, in the French Alps. Previously known by the acronym PACA, the region adopted the name Région Sud as a commercial name or nickname in December 2017. 4,935,576 people live in the region according to the 2012 census. It encompasses six departments in Southeastern France: Alpes-de-Haute-Provence, Alpes-Maritimes, Bouches-du-Rhône, Hautes-Alpes, Var and Vaucluse. It is bounded to the east by the France-Italy border, to the south by the Mediterranean Sea and by the Principality of Monaco, to the north by Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes, and to the west by Occitanie, with the Rhône river marking its westernmost border. The region logotype displays the coat of arms created in the 1990s and which combines the coats of arms of the old provinces making up Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur. Economically the region is the third most important in France, just behind Île-de-France and Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes. Its GDP in 2012 was €142.4 billion (US$183.1 billion) while its per capita GDP was €28,861 ($US 37,121).
2
Routes
901.63
Kilometers
13.58
Hours
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Baden Wurttemberg Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Baden Wurttemberg", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Baden-Württemberg (, German: [ˌbaːdn̩ ˈvʏɐ̯təmbɛɐ̯k] (listen)) is a state in southwest Germany, east of the Rhine, which forms the border with France. It is Germany’s third-largest state, with an area of 35,751 km2 (13,804 sq mi) and 11 million inhabitants. Baden-Württemberg is a parliamentary republic and partly sovereign, federated state which was formed in 1952 by a merger of the states of Württemberg-Baden, Baden and Württemberg-Hohenzollern. The largest city in Baden-Württemberg is the state capital of Stuttgart, followed by Karlsruhe and Mannheim. Other cities are Freiburg im Breisgau, Heidelberg, Heilbronn, Pforzheim, Reutlingen and Ulm. The sobriquet Ländle ("little province" in the local Swabian and Alemannic German dialects) is sometimes used as a synonym for Baden-Württemberg.
1
Routes
317.32
Kilometers
5.81
Hours
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Centre Val de Loire Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Centre Val de Loire", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Centre-Val de Loire (French pronunciation: ​[sɑ̃tʁə val də lwaʁ], literal translation: "Centre-Loire Valley") or Centre Region is one of the 18 administrative regions of France. It straddles the middle Loire Valley in the interior of the country. The administrative capital is Orléans.
2
Routes
617.06
Kilometers
12.36
Hours
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Bourgogne Franche Comte Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Bourgogne Franche Comte", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Bourgogne-Franche-Comté (French pronunciation: ​[buʁɡɔɲ fʁɑ̃ʃ kɔ̃te], sometimes abbreviated BFC; meaning Burgundy–Free County) is a region in the east of France created by the territorial reform of French Regions in 2014, from a merger of Burgundy and Franche-Comté. The new region came into existence on 1 January 2016, after the regional elections of December 2015, electing 100 members to the regional council of Bourgogne-Franche-Comté.The region covers an area of 47,784 km2 (18,450 sq mi), and has a population of 2,816,814.
1
Routes
195.74
Kilometers
4.09
Hours
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Lede France Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Lede France", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Lede may refer to: Lede (journalism) (US English), the lead paragraph of a composition
3
Routes
1010.4
Kilometers
21.4
Hours
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Normandi Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Normandi", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Parajapyx is a genus of diplurans in the family Parajapygidae.
4
Routes
1924.13
Kilometers
37.66
Hours
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Nouvelle Aquitaine Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Nouvelle Aquitaine", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Nouvelle-Aquitaine (French pronunciation: ​[nuvɛl akitɛn], "New Aquitaine"; Occitan: Nòva Aquitània; Basque: Akitania Berria; Poitevin-Saintongeais: Novéle-Aguiéne) is the largest administrative region in France, spanning the west and southwest of the mainland. The region was created by the territorial reform of French Regions in 2014 through the merger of three regions: Aquitaine, Limousin and Poitou-Charentes. It covers 84,061 km2 (32,456 sq mi) – or ​1⁄8 of the country – and has approximately 5,800,000 inhabitants. (municipal population on 1 January 2012). The new region was established on 1 January 2016, following the regional elections in December 2015.It is the largest region in France by area, with a territory slightly larger than that of Austria; even French Guiana is smaller. Its largest city, Bordeaux, together with its suburbs and satellite cities, forms the 7th-largest metropolitan area of France, with 850,000 inhabitants. The region has 25 major urban areas, among which the most important after Bordeaux are Bayonne (288,000 inhabitants), Limoges (283,000), Poitiers (255,000), Pau (241,000), and La Rochelle (206,000), as well as 11 major clusters. The growth of its population, particularly marked on the coast, makes this one of the most attractive areas economically in France; the new region outperforms the Île-de-France and Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur in demographic dynamism. After Île-de-France, New Aquitaine is the premier French region in research and innovation, with five universities (Bordeaux, La Rochelle, Limoges, Poitiers and Pau) and several Grandes Ecoles. The agricultural region of Europe with the greatest turnover, it is the French region with the most tourism jobs, as it has three of the four historic resorts on the French Atlantic coast: (Arcachon, Biarritz and Royan), as well as several ski resorts (e.g. Gourette), and is the fifth French region for business creation (all sectors). Its economy is based on agriculture and viticulture (vineyards of Bordeaux and Cognac), tourism, a powerful aerospace industry, digital economy and design, parachemical and pharmaceutical industries, financial sector (Niort is the fourth-largest financial center in the nation, specializing in mutual insurance companies), and industrial ceramics (Limoges). Many companies specializing in surfing and related sports have located along the coast. The new region includes major parts of Southern France (“Midi de la France”), marked by Basque, Occitan and Oïl (Poitevin and Saintongeais) cultures. Historically, it is the "indirect successor" to medieval Aquitaine, and extends over a large part of the former Duchy of Eleanor of Aquitaine.
1
Routes
420.24
Kilometers
8.58
Hours
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Basel Landschaft Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Basel Landschaft", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The canton of Basel-Landschaft (German: Kanton Basel-Landschaft , English: canton of Basel-Country, French: canton de Bâle-Campagne, Italian: Cantone di Basilea Campagna; informally: Baselland, Baselbiet), is one of the 26 cantons of Switzerland. The capital is Liestal. It shares borders with the Swiss cantons of Basel-Stadt, Solothurn, Jura and Aargau, and with the French région of Grand Est and the German state of Baden-Württemberg.
F AD Cahors Soldeu dag 1 363 km
10-12-2018
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French alps Castellane round trip via Valberg
02-07-2018
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French Alps Lake Annecy round trip
19-06-2018
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French Alps round trip Espinasses Lake Serre Poncon
09-06-2018
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Nederweert Baiersbronn
20-05-2019
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Villard de Lans door de wilde Vercors
13-10-2018
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Millau to Le Pouzin via Gorges du Tarn
10-02-2019
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Provence Bergen en Meren
13-10-2018
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Le Pouzin to Grenoble via Combe Laval
11-02-2019
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rondrit Moere Blaringhem x Doeverentreffen 2017 kort
05-11-2018
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