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The prettiest verified routes in France

 
MyRoute-app helps you with planning your dream journey! All routes on the page have been verified by our RouteXperts. De routes are categorized in regions, when you click on 'view region' you will see all verified routes for that region that are free to use.
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46
Amount of active RouteXperts (worldwide)
722
Amount of routes reviewed by RouteXperts (worldwide)
15131
Amount of downloaded routes (worldwide)
44635
Amount of visits (France)
86
Amount of routes verified by RouteXperts (France)
756
Amount of downloaded routes (France)
Route collections
The route collections by MyRoute-app are collections of multiple routes that belong to each other and checked by MRA RouteXperts. All routes are identical for TomTom, Garmin and MyRoute-app Navigation.
24
Routes
7713.99
Kilometers
161.4
Hours
View route collection The 24 Most Beautiful Alps Routes
About this route collection
The Alps, the Alps are a mountain range in Europe, stretching from the French Mediterranean coast in the southwest to the Pannonian plain in the east. The area of the mountains is more than 200,000 km².

In other words Passes and Mountain roads!

Driving through the mountains is great! Certainly over the mountain passes with hairpin bends and narrow winding roads. Every turn a different view where you can enjoy. There are many beautiful mountain passes in the Alps.

A selection that is also processed in these routes:
The Stleviopas:
The Stelvio Pass, also known as Passo dello Stelvio, is best known for the stage in the Giro d'Italia. In cycling, this pass is seen as one of the toughest tests due to the length and the difference in height. The Stelviopas reaches a maximum height of 2758 meters and is therefore one of the highest in the Alps. Bormio and Prato Allo Stelvio are connected to the pass. The pass is closed in winter due to heavy snowfall.

The Reschen pass:
The Reschen Pass, also known as Passo di Resia, connects the Austrian state of Tyrol with the Italian province of South Tyrol. The pass reaches a maximum height of 1504 meters and has been one of the most important north-south connections in the Alps in recent centuries. The pass was used well before Roman times. Along the way you pass multiple highlights and historical remains. One of the highlights is the Reschensee. This lake was created after the construction of the dam and has completely drained the village of Graun. The only thing that is reminded of this is the clock tower in the middle of the lake.

Col du Galibier:
The French mountain pass Col du Galibier connects the towns of Saint-Michel-de-Maurienne and Briançon via the Col du Lautaret in the south and the Col du Télégraphe in the north. The mountain pass is part of the Tour de France and very feared, due to the fact that it is only accessible via the other two mountain passes. The pass reaches a maximum height of 2646 meters. From there you can take a walk to the viewpoint at 2704 meters. You can admire the peaks of the Grand Galibier, Mont Blanc and La Meije, among others.

The Grossglockner High Alpine Road:
With a height of 3798 meters, the Grossglockner is the highest mountain in Austria. In order to optimally enjoy this impressive mountain, you can drive along the Grossglockner High Alpine Road and associated pass. The route starts from Bruck am Grossglockner and ends in Heiligenblut. You can of course drive both ways. The pass reaches a maximum height of 2504 meters and is closed in winter due to the heavy snowfall. Along the way you pass several stops with fun activities, information points, mountain huts and viewpoints. We recommend a visit to the Kaiser-Franz-Josefs-Höhe and Pasterzen glacier.

The Col d'Izoard:
Just like the Col du Galibier, the Col d'Izoard is also part of a stage of the Tour de France. The mountain pass connects Briançon with the valley of the Guil river. The pass lies partly in the Regional Natural Park of Queyras and reaches a maximum height of 2360 meters. The bare and rocky landscape is special about the Col d'Izoard. It sometimes seems as if you are driving over the moon by car! Along the way you can stop at several points to enjoy the beautiful view.

The Bernina pass:
The Bernina Express is one of the most famous rail trains in Switzerland and the Alps. The route is beautiful and partly included on the UNESCO World Heritage List. Parallel to the railway line is the Bernina Pass, which connects the Veltlindal with the Egandin Valley. This beautiful Alpine road has a total length of 56 kilometers and reaches a maximum height of 2328 meters. Along the way you can enjoy views of the Morteratsch Glacier, among other things.

The Sella pass:
The Sella pass, also known as Passo di Sella, takes you on one of the most impressive mountain ranges of the Dolomites: the Sella massif. The pass connects Valle di Fassa with Val Gardena and reaches a maximum height of 2236 meters. At this altitude is also the border of the Italian provinces of Trentino and Bolzano. Along the way you can enjoy the view of this spectacular mountain world. Admire, for example, the three peaks of the Sasso Lungo mountain range, the Sella mountain range or the peaks of the Marmolada. You can also drive the Sella pass in combination with the Gardena pass, Pordoi pass and Campolongo pass.

The Grimsel pass:
The Grimsel Pass connects Goms in Wallis with the Halis Valley in the Bernese Oberland. The pass reaches a maximum height of 2165 meters and is closed in winter due to snowfall. The mountain pass has played an important role in trade between Switzerland and Italy over the centuries. Now it is mainly the reservoirs that have an important function. These are used for the generation of electricity. The landscape you drive through is rugged, rocky and impressive. On top of the pass is a hotel and a restaurant with a special marmot park. The Dodensee (Totensee) is also located here. This lake owes its name to the many fallen soldiers in the time of Napoleon.

The Gotthard pass:
The Gotthard pass, also called Passo del San Gottardo and Sint-Gotthard, connects the Swiss towns of Airolo and Andermatt. The mountain pass and associated tunnel are best known among holidaymakers who travel from Switzerland to Italy. But where the majority opts for the tunnel, it is precisely the pass that really makes the holiday complete. The Gotthard pass has a length of approximately 26 kilometers and reaches a maximum height of 2106 meters. The route is beautiful and takes you past old villages and beautiful views.

The Silvretta High Alpine Road and Silvretta Pass:
The Paznaun Valley in Tyrol and the Montafon in Vorarlberg are connected by the Silvretta Hochalpenstraße. The route has a length of 22.3 kilometers and leads from Galtür to Partenen in 34 hairpin bends, via the 2032 meter high Bielerhöhe. At this point is also the Silvrettasee, where you can walk. The pass is closed in winter due to snowfall.

The Simplon pass:
Just like the Gotthard pass, many holidaymakers travel the Simplon pass every year. This mountain pass connects the Rhone valley in the Valais canton with the Valle d'Ossola in Piedmont. The pass is open all year round and reaches a maximum height of 2005 meters. Along the way you pass a number of buildings, including the famous Simplon-Hospiz from 1825. The hospiz is managed by the monks of St. Bernard. From the highest point on the pass all kinds of walking routes are possible and you will also come across a hotel where you can spend the night.

The Gerlospas:
The Gerlos Pass connects the Salzachtal in the Salzburgerland with the Zillertal in Tyrol. The pass is part of the Gerlos Alpenstraße and runs right through the Hohe Tauern National Park. Along the way you can enjoy beautiful views of the surroundings. The pass has a length of 12 kilometers and reaches a maximum height of 1531 meters. A ride on the Gerlos Pass is ideal to combine with a visit to the Krimmler Wasserfälle.

The Great St. Bernhard Pass:
The Great St. Bernhard Pass, better known as the Col du Grand Saint Bernard, connects the Italian province of Valle d'Aosta with the Swiss canton of Valais. The pass is one of the highest in Switzerland and reaches a maximum height of 2469 meters. Just like a number of other mountain passes in this list, the Great St. Bernhard Pass has been used for centuries as a connecting road. The pass has its name to think of the St. Bernard dogs who used to help stranded travelers with the monks. The pass is closed in winter.

The Timmelsjoch Hochalpenstrasse:
The Timmelsjoch Hochalpenstrasse connects the towns of Sölden in the Ötztal and Meran in South Tyrol. Toll must be paid on the route Hochgurgl - Moos. Via a mountain road with around 60 hairpin bends you drive through a beautiful mountain world. With the Timmelsjoch Experience you can find out more about the history, the road and the surroundings from various stations. You can also visit the Top Mountain Crosspoint museum.

Col de l'Iséran:
With a maximum pass height of 2770 meters, the Col l'Iséran is one of the highest mountain passes in the Alps. The pass connects Bourg-Saint-Maurice with Bonneval-sur-Arc. You pass Val-d'Isère and a side valley of the Maurienne, which is located entirely in the Vanoise National Park, along a road full of hairpin bends. You can spot animals such as marmots and chamois and there is also a restaurant with a chapel on top of the pass.

The Gaviapas:
The Gaviapass (Italian Passo di Gavia) is a mountain pass in the Italian Alps, in the Lombardy region.
It is one of the highest pass roads in Europe. The road leads right through the unspoilt Stelvio National Park. The road was laid in the First World War for the supply of Italian soldiers who fought in the Italian-Austrian border area. The pass height is one of the most beautiful in the Alps. Here lies the large Lago Bianco with, to the north, the mountain San Matteo (3684 meters). The Lago Nero is slightly lower on the south side of the pass. The Adamello mountain group determines the view here. Many well-marked walks have been plotted in the area. During the winter the pass is closed due to the enormous snowfall. The pass is often closed until May and June due to the large amount of snow.


Promoter has made a selection of the 24 Most Beautiful Alps routes they have plotted in recent years.

The routes continue through:
France
Austria
Switzerland
Italy

The most beautiful roads, the most beautiful views, the most beautiful viewpoints. The highest mountains, the fastest descents, hairpin bend after hairpin bend, you name it you can't get enough.

Are you going on holiday in this region, take advantage of it, ALL routes in this collection have been checked and made the same for TomTom, Garmin and MyRoute-app Navigation by a RouteRpert MyRoute-app.

Have fun with this collection and while driving one of these routes. Enjoy all the beauty that the Alps and the Dolomites have to offer. Click on “View route” to read the review of the chosen route.

I would like to hear your findings about the route (s).


1
Routes
195.74
Kilometers
4.09
Hours
Show region map
Lede France Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Lede France", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Lede may refer to:
13
Routes
4120.39
Kilometers
86.02
Hours
Show region map
Provence Alpes Cote d Azur Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Provence Alpes Cote d Azur", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur (French: [pʁɔvɑ̃s‿alp kot d‿azyʁ]; Occitan: Provença-Aups-Còsta d'Azur; Italian: Provenza-Alpi-Costa Azzurra; Région Sud) is one of the 18 administrative regions of France, the far southeastern on the mainland. Its capital is Marseille. The region is roughly coterminous with the former French province of Provence, with the addition of the following adjacent areas: the former papal territory of Avignon, known as Comtat Venaissin; the former Sardinian-Piedmontese county of Nice, whose coastline is known in English as the French Riviera, and in French as the Côte d'Azur; and the southeastern part of the former French province of Dauphiné, in the French Alps. Previously known by the acronym PACA, the region adopted the name Région Sud as a commercial name or nickname in December 2017. 4,935,576 people live in the region according to the 2012 census. It encompasses six departments in Southeastern France: Alpes-de-Haute-Provence, Alpes-Maritimes, Bouches-du-Rhône, Hautes-Alpes, Var and Vaucluse. It is bounded to the east by the France-Italy border, to the south by the Mediterranean Sea and by the Principality of Monaco, to the north by Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes, and to the west by Occitanie, with the Rhône river marking its westernmost border. The region logotype displays the coat of arms created in the 1990s and which combines the coats of arms of the old provinces making up Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur. Economically the region is the third most important in France, just behind Île-de-France and Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes. Its GDP in 2012 was €142.4 billion (US$183.1 billion) while its per capita GDP was €28,861 ($US 37,121).
2
Routes
901.63
Kilometers
13.58
Hours
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Baden Wurttemberg Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Baden Wurttemberg", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Baden-Württemberg (, German: [ˌbaːdn̩ ˈvʏʁtəmbɛʁk] (listen)) is a state in southwest Germany, east of the Rhine, which forms the border with France. It is Germany’s third-largest state, with an area of 35,751 km2 (13,804 sq mi) and 11 million inhabitants. Baden-Württemberg is a parliamentary republic and partly sovereign, federated state which was formed in 1952 by a merger of the states of Württemberg-Baden, Baden and Württemberg-Hohenzollern. The largest city in Baden-Württemberg is the state capital of Stuttgart, followed by Karlsruhe and Mannheim. Other cities are Freiburg im Breisgau, Heidelberg, Heilbronn, Pforzheim, Reutlingen and Ulm. The sobriquet Ländle ("little province" in the local Swabian and Alemannic German dialects) is sometimes used as a synonym for Baden-Württemberg.
1
Routes
379.59
Kilometers
6.72
Hours
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Navarra Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Navarra", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Navarre (English: ; Spanish: Navarra [naˈβara]; Basque: Nafarroa [nafaro.a]; Occitan: Navarra [naˈbaʀɔ]), officially the Chartered Community of Navarre (Spanish: Comunidad Foral de Navarra [komuniˈðað foˈɾal de naˈβara]; Basque: Nafarroako Foru Komunitatea [nafaro.ako foɾu komunitate.a]), is an autonomous community and province in northern Spain, bordering the Basque Autonomous Community, La Rioja, and Aragon in Spain and Nouvelle-Aquitaine in France. The capital city is Pamplona (or Iruñea in Basque).
1
Routes
317.32
Kilometers
5.81
Hours
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Centre Val de Loire Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Centre Val de Loire", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Centre-Val de Loire (French pronunciation: ​[sɑ̃tʁə val də lwaʁ], literal translation: "Centre-Loire Valley") or Centre Region is one of the 18 administrative regions of France. It straddles the middle Loire Valley in the interior of the country. The administrative capital is Orléans.
10
Routes
2731.83
Kilometers
52.09
Hours
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Wallonie Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Wallonie", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Wallonia (; French: Wallonie [walɔni]; German: Wallonien [vaˈloːni̯ən] (listen) or Wallonie [valoˈniː]; Dutch: Wallonië [ʋɑˈloːnijə] (listen); Walloon: Walonreye [walɔnʀɛj]; Luxembourgish: Wallounien [vɑˈləʊ̯niə̯n]) is a region of Belgium. As the southern portion of the country, Wallonia is primarily French-speaking, and accounts for 55% of Belgium's territory, but only a third of its population. The Walloon Region was not merged with the French Community of Belgium, which is the political entity responsible for matters related mainly to culture and education, because the French Community of Belgium encompasses both Wallonia and the majority French-Speaking Brussels-Capital Region. The German-speaking minority in eastern Wallonia results from World War I and the subsequent annexation of three cantons that were initially part of the former German empire. This community represents less than 1% of the Belgian population. It forms the German-speaking Community of Belgium, which has its own government and parliament for culture-related issues. During the industrial revolution, Wallonia was second only to the United Kingdom in industrialization, capitalizing on its extensive deposits of coal and iron. This brought the region wealth, and from the beginning of the 19th to the middle of the 20th century, Wallonia was the more prosperous half of Belgium. Since World War II, the importance of heavy industry has greatly diminished, and the Flemish Region surpassed Wallonia in wealth, as Wallonia declined economically. Wallonia now suffers from high unemployment and has a significantly lower GDP per capita than Flanders. The economic inequalities and linguistic divide between the two are major sources of political conflicts in Belgium and a major factor in Flemish separatism. The capital of Wallonia is Namur, and the most populous city is Charleroi. Most of Wallonia's major cities and two-thirds of its population lie along the Sambre and Meuse valley, the former industrial backbone of Belgium. To the north lies the Central Belgian Plateau, which, like Flanders, is relatively flat and agriculturally fertile. In the southeast lie the Ardennes, hilly and sparsely populated. Wallonia borders Flanders and the Netherlands (Limburg) in the north, France (Grand Est and Hauts-de-France) to the south and west, and Germany (North Rhine-Westphalia and Rhineland-Palatinate) and Luxembourg (Capellen, Clervaux, Esch-sur-Alzette, Redange and Wiltz) to the east. Wallonia has been a member of the Organisation Internationale de la Francophonie since 1980.
4
Routes
2071
Kilometers
39.51
Hours
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Aragn Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Aragn", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Ruy López Dávalos (Úbeda, Jaén Province, Spain, 1357 - in exile, Valencia, Spain, 1428), Count of Ribadeo since it was sold by the first count, the Frenchman Pierre de Villaines, who received it from Henry II of Castile on 20 December 1369, Adelantado of Murcia, 1396, Constable of Castile, 1400–1423, during the reigns of kings Henry III of Castile and John II of Castile. He was very attached to king Henry III's uncle, Ferdinand of Antequera, afterwards elected king Ferdinand I of Aragon, king 1412-1416. He was attached then to one of Ferdinand's troublesome sons, Infante Henry of Aragon (1400–1445).
20
Routes
5595.34
Kilometers
110.95
Hours
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Auvergne Rhone Alpes Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Auvergne Rhone Alpes", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes or ARA (French pronunciation: [ovɛʁɲ ʁon alp] (listen), Arpitan: Ôvèrgne-Rôno-Ârpes, Occitan: Auvèrnhe Ròse Aups, Italian: Alvernia-Rodano-Alpi) is a region in southeast-central France created by the territorial reform of French Regions in 2015; it resulted from the merger of Auvergne and Rhône-Alpes. The new region came into effect on 1 January 2016, after the regional elections in December 2015.The region covers an area of more than 69,711 km2 (26,916 sq mi), making it the third largest in metropolitan France, and has a population of 7,877,698, second only to Île-de-France. It consists of 12 departments and one territorial collectivity. Lyon is the chef-lieu of the region. This new region combines diverse geographical, sociological, economic, and cultural regions, which was already true of Rhône-Alpes, as well as Auvergne, to a lesser extent. While the old Rhône-Alpes and Auvergne regions each enjoyed a unity defined by axes of communication and the pull of their respective metropoles, the new combination is heterogeneous, and sustained lively opposition from some local officials after its creation.
2
Routes
472.51
Kilometers
10.5
Hours
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Pays de la Loire Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Pays de la Loire", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Pays de la Loire (French pronunciation: ​[pe.i də la lwaʁ]; meaning Loire Countries) is one of the 18 regions of France, in the west of the mainland. It is one of the regions created in the 1950s to serve as a zone of influence for its capital, Nantes, one of a handful of so-called "balancing metropolises" (métropoles d'équilibre)¹.
17
Routes
4682.18
Kilometers
86.03
Hours
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Grand Est Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Grand Est", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Grand Est (French pronunciation: [ɡʁɑ̃t‿ɛst] (listen), meaning "Great East"; Alsatian: d'r Grossa Oschta; Moselle Franconian/Luxembourgish: de Grouss Osten; German: der Große Osten [dɛɐ̯ ˈɡʁoːsɐ ˈɔstn̩]) is an administrative region in northeastern France. It superseded three former administrative regions—Alsace, Champagne-Ardenne, and Lorraine—on 1 January 2016 under the provisional name of Alsace-Champagne-Ardenne-Lorraine (ACAL or less commonly, ALCA), as a result of territorial reform which had been passed by the French legislature back in 2014.The region sits astride three water basins (Seine, Meuse and Rhine), spanning an area of 57,433 km2 (22,175 sq mi), the 5th largest in France, and includes two mountain ranges (Vosges and Ardennes). It shares borders with Belgium, Luxemburg, Germany, and Switzerland, and stands partly within the European Megalopolis. As of 2016, it had a population of 5,555,186 inhabitants. The administrative capital and largest city is Strasbourg. The East of France has a rich and diverse culture, being situated at a crossroads between the Latin and Germanic worlds which is reflected in the variety of languages spoken there (Alsatian, Champenois, Lorraine Franconian etc.). Most of today's Grand Est region was considered "Eastern" as early as the 8th century, when it constituted the southern part of the Francian territory of Austrasia. The city of Reims (in Champagne), where Frankish king Clovis I had been baptized in 496 AD, would later play a prominent ceremonial role in French monarchical history as the traditional site of the coronation of the kings of France. The Champagne fairs played a significant role in the economy of medieval Europe as well. Alsace and Lorraine thrived in the sphere of influence of the Holy Roman Empire for most of the Middle Ages and Renaissance. The region is home to distinctive traditions (the celebration of Saint Nicholas Day, Christmas markets, or traditions involving the Easter hare in Alsace and Lorraine). Alsace-Moselle are furthermore subject to local law for historical reasons. With a long industrial history as well and its agriculture and tourism (arts, gastronomy, sightseeing etc.), the East of France is one of the top economic producing regions in the country.
11
Routes
3955.76
Kilometers
77.26
Hours
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Occitanie Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Occitanie", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Occitanie (French: [ɔksitani] (listen); Occitan: Occitània [utsiˈtanjɔ]; Catalan: Occitània [uksiˈtaniə]) or Occitania is the southernmost administrative region of metropolitan France excluding Corsica, created on 1 January 2016 from the former regions of Languedoc-Roussillon and Midi-Pyrénées. The Conseil d'État approved Occitanie as the new name of the region on 28 September 2016, coming into effect on 30 September 2016.The modern administrative region is named after the cultural and historical region of Occitania, which covers a larger area. The region as it is today covers a territory similar to that ruled by the Counts of Toulouse in the 12th and 13th centuries. The banner of arms of the Counts of Toulouse, known colloquially as the Occitan cross, is used by the modern region and is also a popular cultural symbol.
20
Routes
4714.53
Kilometers
105.05
Hours
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Hauts de France Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Hauts de France", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Hauts-de-France (French pronunciation: ​[o d(ə) fʁɑ̃s], Dutch: Opper-Frankrijk, meaning "Upper France") is the northernmost region of France, created by the territorial reform of French Regions in 2014, from a merger of Nord-Pas-de-Calais and Picardy. Its capital is Lille. The new region came into existence on 1 January 2016, after the regional elections in December 2015. France's Conseil d'État approved Hauts-de-France as the name of the region on 28 September 2016, effective 30 September 2016.With 6,009,976 inhabitants (as of 1 January 2015), and a population of 189 inhabitants/km2, it represents the 3rd most populous region in France and the 2nd most densely populated in metropolitan France after its southern neighbor Île-de-France.
5
Routes
2303.69
Kilometers
43.82
Hours
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Nouvelle Aquitaine Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Nouvelle Aquitaine", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Nouvelle-Aquitaine (French pronunciation: ​[nuvɛl akitɛn], "New Aquitaine"; Occitan: Nòva Aquitània; Basque: Akitania Berria; Poitevin-Saintongeais: Novéle-Aguiéne; Spanish: Nueva Aquitania) is the largest administrative region in France, spanning the west and southwest of the mainland. The region was created by the territorial reform of French Regions in 2014 through the merger of three regions: Aquitaine, Limousin and Poitou-Charentes. It covers 84,061 km2 (32,456 sq mi) – or ​1⁄8 of the country – and has approximately 5,800,000 inhabitants. (municipal population on 1 January 2012). The new region was established on 1 January 2016, following the regional elections in December 2015.It is the largest region in France by area, with a territory slightly larger than that of Austria; even French Guiana is smaller. Its largest city, Bordeaux, together with its suburbs and satellite cities, forms the 7th-largest metropolitan area of France, with 850,000 inhabitants. The region has 25 major urban areas, among which the most important after Bordeaux are Bayonne (288,000 inhabitants), Limoges (283,000), Poitiers (255,000), Pau (241,000), and La Rochelle (206,000), as well as 11 major clusters. The growth of its population, particularly marked on the coast, makes this one of the most attractive areas economically in France; the new region outperforms the Île-de-France and Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur in demographic dynamism. After Île-de-France, New Aquitaine is the premier French region in research and innovation, with five universities (Bordeaux, La Rochelle, Limoges, Poitiers and Pau) and several Grandes Ecoles. The agricultural region of Europe with the greatest turnover, it is the French region with the most tourism jobs, as it has three of the four historic resorts on the French Atlantic coast: (Arcachon, Biarritz and Royan), as well as several ski resorts (e.g. Gourette), and is the fifth French region for business creation (all sectors). Its economy is based on agriculture and viticulture (vineyards of Bordeaux and Cognac), tourism, a powerful aerospace industry, digital economy and design, parachemical and pharmaceutical industries, financial sector (Niort is the fourth-largest financial center in the nation, specialising in mutual insurance companies), and industrial ceramics (Limoges). Many companies specialising in surfing and related sports have located along the coast. The new region includes major parts of Southern France (“Midi de la France”), marked by Basque, Occitan and Oïl (Poitevin and Saintongeais) cultures. Historically, it is the "indirect successor" to medieval Aquitaine, and extends over a large part of the former Duchy of Eleanor of Aquitaine.
1
Routes
217.02
Kilometers
5.24
Hours
Show region map
Bretagne Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Bretagne", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Bretagne may refer to:
4
Routes
1077.8
Kilometers
20.94
Hours
Show region map
Bourgogne Franche Comte Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Bourgogne Franche Comte", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Bourgogne-Franche-Comté (French: [buʁɡɔɲ fʁɑ̃ʃ kɔ̃te] (listen); lit. "Burgundy–Free County"), sometimes abbreviated BFC, is a region in the east of France created by the territorial reform of French Regions in 2014, from a merger of Burgundy and Franche-Comté. The new region came into existence on 1 January 2016, after the regional elections of December 2015, electing 100 members to the regional council of Bourgogne-Franche-Comté.The region covers an area of 47,784 km2 (18,450 sq mi), and has a population of 2,816,814.
3
Routes
970.67
Kilometers
21.06
Hours
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Normandi Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Normandi", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Parajapyx is a genus of diplurans in the family Parajapygidae.
4
Routes
892.88
Kilometers
21.56
Hours
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Corsica Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Corsica", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Corsica (; French: Corse [kɔʁs]; Corsica in Corsican and Italian, pronounced [ˈkorsiga] and [ˈkɔrsika] respectively) is an island in the Mediterranean Sea and one of the 18 regions of France. It is located southeast of the French mainland and west of the Italian Peninsula, with the nearest land mass being the Italian island of Sardinia to the immediate south. A single chain of mountains makes up two-thirds of the island. The island is an administrative region of France (with the regional capital being Ajaccio), divided in two administrative departments, Haute-Corse and Corse-du-Sud. The corresponding regional and departmental territorial collectivities, however, merged on 1 January 2018, forming the single territorial collectivity of Corsica. As a single territorial collectivity, Corsica enjoys a greater degree of autonomy than other French regional collectivities; for example, the Corsican Assembly is able to exercise limited executive powers. Bastia, the prefecture city of Haute-Corse, is the second largest town in Corsica. After being ruled by the Republic of Genoa since 1284, in 1755 Corsica became a self-proclaimed Italian-speaking Republic, until it was officially ceded by Genoa to Louis XV as part of a pledge for debts and subsequently annexed to France in 1769. Napoleon Bonaparte was born the same year in Ajaccio, and his ancestral home (Maison Bonaparte) is today a significant visitor attraction and museum. Due to Corsica's historical ties with the Italian peninsula, the island retains many Italian cultural elements, and the native tongue is recognized as a regional language by the French government.
1
Routes
420.24
Kilometers
8.58
Hours
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Basel Landschaft Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Basel Landschaft", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The canton of Basel-Landschaft (German: Kanton Basel-Landschaft , English: canton of Basel-Country, French: canton de Bâle-Campagne, Italian: Cantone di Basilea Campagna; informally: Baselland, Baselbiet), is one of the 26 cantons of Switzerland. The capital is Liestal. It shares borders with the Swiss cantons of Basel-Stadt, Solothurn, Jura and Aargau, and with the French région of Grand Est and the German state of Baden-Württemberg.
Trappisten proeven in de Ardennen
03-12-2018
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Highlights of the Pyrenees
04-02-2019
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Biarritz to Ainsa
24-09-2019
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Roundtrip Montherme Hargnies Furnay Rocroi Montherme
27-09-2019
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Rondrit Gorges du Verdon vanuit Castellane
05-02-2019
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Round trip from Clermont Ferrand visiting the Land of Volcanoes
09-02-2019
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Route Paysagere vanuit Antoing naar Bavay
20-02-2018
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La Seu dUrgell to Carcassonne via Andorra
13-02-2019
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rondrit Moere Wulverdinghe x Doeverentreffen 2014 kort
21-02-2017
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rondrit Moere SaintOmer x Doeverentreffen 2009
21-02-2017
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