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The prettiest verified routes in France

MyRoute-app helps you with planning your dream journey! All routes on the page have been verified by our RouteXperts. De routes are categorized in regions, when you click on 'view region' you will see all verified routes for that region that are free to use.
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35
Amount of active RouteXperts (worldwide)
404
Amount of routes reviewd by RouteXperts (worldwide)
3087
Amount of downloaded routes (worldwide)
5300
Amount of visits (France)
38
Amount of routes verified by RouteXperts (France)
187
Amount of downloaded routes (France)
2
Routes
809.37
Kilometers
17.27
Hours
Show region map
Haute Normandie Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Haute Normandie", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Upper Normandy (French: Haute-Normandie, IPA: [ot nɔʁmɑ̃di]; Norman: Ĥâote-Normaundie) is a former administrative region of France. On 1 January 2016, Upper and Lower Normandy merged becoming one region called Normandy.
2
Routes
765.84
Kilometers
15.63
Hours
Show region map
Normandie Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Normandie", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The SS Normandie was an ocean liner built in Saint-Nazaire, France, for the French Line Compagnie Générale Transatlantique (CGT). She entered service in 1935 as the largest and fastest passenger ship afloat; she remains the most powerful steam turbo-electric-propelled passenger ship ever built.Her novel design and lavish interiors led many to consider her the greatest of ocean liners. Despite this, she was not a commercial success and relied partly on government subsidy to operate. During service as the flagship of the CGT, she made 139 westbound transatlantic crossings from her home port of Le Havre to New York. Normandie held the Blue Riband for the fastest transatlantic crossing at several points during her service career, during which the RMS Queen Mary was her main rival. During World War II, Normandie was seized by U.S. authorities at New York and renamed USS Lafayette. In 1942, the liner caught fire while being converted to a troopship, capsized onto her port side and came to rest on the mud of the Hudson River at Pier 88, the site of the current New York Passenger Ship Terminal. Although salvaged at great expense, restoration was deemed too costly and she was scrapped in October 1946.
3
Routes
1668.66
Kilometers
32.42
Hours
Show region map
Aquitaine Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Aquitaine", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Aquitaine (UK: , US: ; French: [akitɛn]; Occitan: Aquitània; Basque: Akitania; Poitevin-Saintongeais: Aguiéne), archaic Guyenne/Guienne (Occitan: Guiana), is a traditional region of France, and was an administrative region of France until 1 January 2016. It is now part of the region Nouvelle-Aquitaine. It is situated in the south-western part of Metropolitan France, along the Atlantic Ocean and the Pyrenees mountain range on the border with Spain. It is composed of the five departments of Dordogne, Lot-et-Garonne, Pyrénées-Atlantiques, Landes and Gironde. In the Middle Ages, Aquitaine was a kingdom and a duchy, whose boundaries fluctuated considerably.
2
Routes
624.91
Kilometers
11.88
Hours
Show region map
Poitou Charentes Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Poitou Charentes", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Poitou-Charentes (French pronunciation: [pwatu ʃaʁɑ̃t] (listen)) is a former administrative region in south-western France. It is part of the new region Nouvelle-Aquitaine. It comprises four departments: Charente, Charente-Maritime, Deux-Sèvres and Vienne. Historical provinces are Angoumois, Aunis, Saintonge and Poitou. The regional capital is Poitiers. Other important cities are La Rochelle, Niort, Angoulême, Châtellerault, Saintes, Rochefort and Royan.
1
Routes
232.76
Kilometers
5.02
Hours
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Auvergne Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Auvergne", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Auvergne (; French: [ovɛʁɲ] (listen); Auvergnat: Auvèrnhe / Auvèrnha) is a former administrative region of France. Since 1 January 2016, it is part of the new region Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes. It comprises four departments: Allier, Puy-de-Dôme, Cantal and Haute-Loire. The administrative region of Auvergne is larger than the historical province of Auvergne, one of the seven counties of Occitania, and includes provinces and areas that historically were not part of Auvergne. The Auvergne region is composed of the following old provinces: Auvergne: departments of Puy-de-Dôme, Cantal, northwest of Haute-Loire, and extreme south of Allier. The province of Auvergne is entirely contained inside the Auvergne region Bourbonnais: department of Allier. A small part of Bourbonnais is also contained inside the Centre-Val de Loire region (south of the department of Cher). Velay: centre and southeast of department of Haute-Loire. Velay is entirely contained inside the Auvergne region. a small part of Gévaudan: extreme southwest of Haute-Loire. Gévaudan is essentially inside the Languedoc-Roussillon region. a small part of Vivarais: extreme southeast of Haute-Loire. Vivarais is essentially inside the Rhône-Alpes region. a small part of Forez: extreme northeast of Haute-Loire. Forez is essentially inside the Rhône-Alpes region.Velay, Gévaudan, and Vivarais are often considered to be sub-provinces of the old province of Languedoc. Forez is also often considered to be a sub-province of Lyonnais. Therefore, the modern region of Auvergne is composed of the provinces of Auvergne, major part of Bourbonnais, and parts of Languedoc and Lyonnais. The region is home to a chain of volcanoes known collectively as the "chaîne des Puys". The last confirmed eruption was around 4040 BCE. The volcanoes began forming some 70,000 years ago, and most have eroded, leaving plugs of hardened magma that form rounded hilltops known as puys.
1
Routes
244.55
Kilometers
5.95
Hours
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Eure Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Eure", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Eure (French pronunciation: ​[œʁ]) is a department in the north of France named after the river Eure.
2
Routes
809.37
Kilometers
17.27
Hours
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Seine Maritime Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Seine Maritime", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Seine-Maritime (French pronunciation: ​[sɛn maʁitim]) is a department of France in the Normandy region of northern France. It is situated on the northern coast of France, at the mouth of the Seine, and includes the cities of Rouen and Le Havre. Until 1955 it was named Seine-Inférieure.
3
Routes
1010.39
Kilometers
21.57
Hours
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Calvados Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Calvados", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Calvados (French pronunciation: ​[kal.va.dos]) is an apple or pear brandy from the Normandy region in France.
2
Routes
1297.62
Kilometers
25.8
Hours
Show region map
Aragon Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Aragon", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Aragon ( or , Spanish and Aragonese: Aragón [aɾaˈɣon], Catalan: Aragó [əɾəˈɣo]) is an autonomous community in Spain, coextensive with the medieval Kingdom of Aragon. Located in northeastern Spain, the Aragonese autonomous community comprises three provinces (from north to south): Huesca, Zaragoza, and Teruel. Its capital is Zaragoza (also called Saragossa in English). The current Statute of Autonomy declares Aragon a historic nationality of Spain. Covering an area of 47720 km2 (18420 sq mi), the region's terrain ranges diversely from permanent glaciers to verdant valleys, rich pasture lands and orchards, through to the arid steppe plains of the central lowlands. Aragon is home to many rivers—most notably, the river Ebro, Spain's largest river in volume, which runs west-east across the entire region through the province of Zaragoza. It is also home to the highest mountains of the Pyrenees. As of January 2016, the population of Aragon was 1308563, with over half of it living in its capital city, Zaragoza. During the same year, the economy of Aragon generates a GDP of €34687 million, which represents 3.1% of Spain's national GDP, and is currently 6th in per capita production behind Madrid, Basque Country, Navarre, Catalonia and La Rioja.In addition to its three provinces, Aragon is subdivided into 33 comarcas or counties. All comarcas of Aragon have a rich geopolitical and cultural history from its pre-Roman, Celtic and Roman days, and four centuries of Islamic period as Marca Superior of Al-Andalus or kingdom (or taifa) of Saraqusta, and as lands that once belonged to the Frankish Marca Hispanica, counties that later formed the Kingdom of Aragon and eventually the empire or Crown of Aragon.
2
Routes
470.89
Kilometers
10.51
Hours
Show region map
Pays de la Loire Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Pays de la Loire", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Pays de la Loire (French pronunciation: ​[pe.i də la lwaʁ]; meaning Loire Countries) is one of the 18 regions of France. It is one of the regions created in the 1950s to serve as a zone of influence for its capital, Nantes, one of a handful of so-called "balancing metropolises" (métropoles d'équilibre)¹.
1
Routes
217.02
Kilometers
5.24
Hours
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Brittany Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Brittany", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Brittany (; French: Bretagne [bʁətaɲ] (listen); Breton: Breizh, pronounced [bʁɛjs] or [bʁɛχ]; Gallo: Bertaèyn, pronounced [bəʁtaɛɲ]) is a cultural region in the northwest of France, covering the western part of what was known as Armorica during the period of Roman occupation. It became an independent kingdom and then a duchy before being united with the Kingdom of France in 1532 as a province governed as if it were a separate nation under the crown. Brittany has also been referred to as Less, Lesser or Little Britain (as opposed to Great Britain, with which it shares an etymology). It is bordered by the English Channel to the north, the Celtic Sea and the Atlantic Ocean to the west, and the Bay of Biscay to the south. Its land area is 34,023 km² (13,136 sq mi). Brittany is the site of some of the world's oldest standing architecture, home to the Barnenez, the Tumulus Saint-Michel and others, which date to the early 5th millennium BC. Today, the historical province of Brittany is split among five French departments: Finistère in the west, Côtes-d'Armor in the north, Ille-et-Vilaine in the north east, Loire-Atlantique in the south east and Morbihan in the south on the Bay of Biscay. Since reorganisation in 1956, the modern administrative region of Brittany comprises only four of the five Breton departments, or 80% of historical Brittany. The remaining area of old Brittany, the Loire-Atlantique department around Nantes, now forms part of the Pays de la Loire region. At the 2010 census, the population of historic Brittany was estimated to be 4,475,295. Of these, 71% lived in the region of Brittany, while 29% lived in the Loire-Atlantique department. In 2012, the largest metropolitan areas were Nantes (897,713 inhabitants), Rennes (690,467 inhabitants), and Brest (314,844 inhabitants). Brittany is the traditional homeland of the Breton people and is recognised by the Celtic League as one of the six Celtic nations, retaining a distinct cultural identity that reflects its history. A nationalist movement seeks greater autonomy within the French Republic.
2
Routes
437.22
Kilometers
10.14
Hours
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Cesana Torinese Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Cesana Torinese", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Cesana Torinese (French Césanne) is a comune (municipality) in the Metropolitan City of Turin in the Italian region Piedmont, located about 70 kilometres (43 mi) west of Turin, on the border with France.
1
Routes
148.49
Kilometers
4.52
Hours
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Bardonecchia Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Bardonecchia", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Bardonecchia (Template:IPA-ita) (French: Bardonèche or Bardonnèche French pronunciation: ​[baʁdoneʃ]; Occitan: Bardonecha Occitan pronunciation: [barduˈnetʃa]) is an Italian town and comune located in the Metropolitan City of Turin, in the Piedmont region, in the western part of Susa Valley. It grew out of a small village with the works for the Frejus Rail Tunnel, the first crossing the Alps. The town hosted the snowboarding events of the 2006 Winter Olympics.
2
Routes
437.22
Kilometers
10.14
Hours
Show region map
Cesana Torinese Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Cesana Torinese", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Cesana Torinese (French Césanne) is a comune (municipality) in the Metropolitan City of Turin in the Italian region Piedmont, located about 70 kilometres (43 mi) west of Turin, on the border with France.
2
Routes
437.22
Kilometers
10.14
Hours
Show region map
Montgenevre Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Montgenevre", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Montgenèvre is a commune of the Hautes-Alpes department in southeastern France.
2
Routes
437.22
Kilometers
10.14
Hours
Show region map
Val des Pres Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Val des Pres", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Val-des-Prés is a commune in the Hautes-Alpes department in southeastern France. It is situated in the Clarée Valley.
1
Routes
148.49
Kilometers
4.52
Hours
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Nevache Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Nevache", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Névache (French pronunciation: ​[nevaʃ]; Occitan: Nevascha [neˈvastʃɔ, neˈvaːtsɔ]) is a commune in the Hautes-Alpes department in southeastern France.
2
Routes
437.22
Kilometers
10.14
Hours
Show region map
TO Italien Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "TO Italien", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Comédie-Italienne or Théâtre-Italien are French names which have been used to refer to Italian-language theatre and opera when performed in France. The earliest recorded visits by Italian players were commedia dell'arte companies employed by the French court under the Italian-born queens Catherine de Medici and Marie de Medici. These troupes also gave public performances in Paris at the theatre of the Hôtel de Bourgogne, probably the earliest public theatre to be built in France. The first official use of the name Comédie-Italienne was in 1680, when it was given to the commedia dell'arte troupe at the Hôtel de Bourgogne, to distinguish it from the French troupe, the Comédie-Française, which was founded that year, and just as the name Théâtre-Français was commonly applied to the latter, Théâtre-Italien was used for the Italians. Over time French phrases, songs, whole scenes, and eventually entire plays were incorporated into the Comédie-Italienne's performances. By 1762 the company was merged with the Opéra-Comique, but the names Comédie-Italienne and Théâtre-Italien continued to be used, even though the repertory soon became almost exclusively French opéra-comique. The names were dropped completely in 1801, when the company was merged with the Théâtre Feydeau. From 1801 to 1878, Théâtre-Italien was used for a succession of Parisian opera companies performing Italian opera in Italian. In 1980 the name La Comédie-Italienne was used for a theatre in the Montparnasse district of Paris, which presents Italian commedia dell'arte plays in French translation.
2
Routes
437.22
Kilometers
10.14
Hours
Show region map
Piemont Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Piemont", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Piedmont ( PEED-mont; Italian: Piemonte, pronounced [pjeˈmonte]; Piedmontese, Occitan and Arpitan: Piemont, Piedmontese pronunciation: [pjeˈmʊŋt]) is a region in northwest Italy, one of the 20 regions of the country. It borders the Liguria region to the south, the Lombardy and Emilia-Romagna regions to the east and the Aosta Valley region to the northwest; it also borders France to the west and Switzerland to the northeast. It has an area of 25,402 square kilometres (9,808 sq mi) and a population of 4 377 941 as of 30 November 2017. The capital of Piedmont is Turin.
3
Routes
861.49
Kilometers
16.97
Hours
Show region map
Barcelonnette Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Barcelonnette", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Barcelonnette (French pronunciation: ​[baʁsəlɔnɛt]; Occitan: Barcilona de Provença) is a commune of France and a subprefecture in the department of Alpes-de-Haute-Provence, in the Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur region. It is located in the southern French Alps, at the crossroads between Provence, Piedmont and the Dauphiné, and is the largest town in the Ubaye Valley. The town's inhabitants are known as Barcelonnettes.
3
Routes
865.75
Kilometers
17.03
Hours
Show region map
Saint etienne de tinee Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Saint etienne de tinee", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Saint-Étienne-de-Tinée (Italian: Santo Stefano di Tinea) is a commune in the Alpes-Maritimes department in southeastern France. It was part of the historic County of Nice until 1860. The ski resort of Auron is located on the territory of the commune, and linked to the village of Saint-Étienne-de-Tinée directly by a gondola lift.
7
Routes
1794.47
Kilometers
38.25
Hours
Show region map
provence Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "provence", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Provence (, US: ; French: [pʁɔvɑ̃s]; Provençal: Provença in classical norm or Prouvènço in Mistralian norm, pronounced [pʀuˈvɛnsɔ]) is a geographical region and historical province of southeastern France, which extends from the left bank of the lower Rhône River to the west to the Italian border to the east, and is bordered by the Mediterranean Sea to the south. It largely corresponds with the modern administrative région of Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, and includes the départements of Var, Bouches-du-Rhône, Alpes-de-Haute-Provence and parts of Alpes-Maritimes and Vaucluse. The largest city of the region is Marseille. The Romans made the region the first Roman province beyond the Alps and called it Provincia Romana, which evolved into the present name. Until 1481 it was ruled by the Counts of Provence from their capital in Aix-en-Provence, then became a province of the Kings of France. While it has been part of France for more than five hundred years, it still retains a distinct cultural and linguistic identity, particularly in the interior of the region.
1
Routes
285.69
Kilometers
6.41
Hours
Show region map
Beauvezer Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Beauvezer", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Beauvezer is a commune in the Alpes-de-Haute-Provence department in southeastern France.
4
Routes
1809.01
Kilometers
39.06
Hours
Show region map
Catalonie Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Catalonie", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
This is a list of rail accidents since 2010.
2
Routes
1297.62
Kilometers
25.8
Hours
Show region map
Huesca Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Huesca", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Huesca (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈweska]; Aragonese: Uesca) is a city in north-eastern Spain, within the autonomous community of Aragon. It is also the capital of the Spanish province of the same name and of the comarca of Hoya de Huesca. In 2009 it had a population of 52,059, almost a quarter of the total population of the province. The city is one of the smallest provincial capitals in Spain. Huesca celebrates its main festival Fiestas de San Lorenzo from 9 to 15 August.
4
Routes
1149.77
Kilometers
23.87
Hours
Show region map
Aude Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Aude", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Aude (French: [od]; Occitan: [ˈawðe]) is a department in south-central France named after the river Aude. The local council also calls the department "Cathar Country" after a group of religious dissidents active in the 12th century. Aude is a frequent feminine French given name in Francophone countries, deriving initially from Aude or Oda, a wife of Bertrand, Duke of Aquitaine, and mother of Eudo, brother of Saint Hubertus. Aude was the name of Roland's fiancée in the chansons de geste.
4
Routes
1216.42
Kilometers
25.46
Hours
Show region map
Ariege Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Ariege", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Ariège may refer to: Ariège (department), department in the Midi-Pyrénées region of southwestern France, named after the river of the same name Ariège (river), river in southern France SS Ariège, cargo ship Ariege (horse), a filly born to Kostroma
2
Routes
1449.54
Kilometers
28.57
Hours
Show region map
Haute Garonne Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Haute Garonne", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Haute-Garonne (French pronunciation: ​[otɡaʁɔn]; Occitan: Nauta Garona; English: Upper Garonne) is a department in the southwest of France named after the Garonne river. Its main city and capital is Toulouse.
1
Routes
1086.61
Kilometers
21.81
Hours
Show region map
Hautes Pyrenees Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Hautes Pyrenees", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Hautes-Pyrénées (French pronunciation: ​[ot pi.ʁe.ne]) (Gascon/Occitan: Nauts Pirenèus / Hauts Pirenèus ['awts piɾeˈnɛʊs]; Spanish: Altos Pirineos; Catalan: Alts Pirineus ['alts piɾiˈneʊs]) is a department in southwestern France. It is part of the Occitanie region.
3
Routes
1668.66
Kilometers
32.42
Hours
Show region map
Pyrenees Atlantiques Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Pyrenees Atlantiques", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Pyrénées-Atlantiques (French pronunciation: ​[piʁene atlɑ̃tik]; Gascon: Pirenèus-Atlantics; Basque: Pirinio Atlantiarrak or Pirinio Atlantikoak) is a department in the region of Nouvelle-Aquitaine, in southwestern France. It takes its name from the Pyrenees mountains and the Atlantic Ocean. It covers the French Basque Country and the Béarn.
4
Routes
1151.44
Kilometers
23.44
Hours
Show region map
Seealpen Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Seealpen", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The Gorges de Daluis is a six-kilometer-long canyon formed by the river Var in the Alpes-Maritimes department in southeastern France. It runs south from Guillaumes to Daluis.
6
Routes
1645.98
Kilometers
33.73
Hours
Show region map
Alpes de Haute Provence Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Alpes de Haute Provence", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Alpes-de-Haute-Provence (French pronunciation: ​[alp.də.ot.pʁɔ.vɑ̃s]; "Alps of Upper Provence"; Occitan: Aups d'Auta Provença) is a department in the Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur region in Southeastern France. Formerly part of the province of Provence, it had a population of 161,916 in 2013. Its main cities are Digne-les-Bains (prefecture), Manosque, Sisteron, Barcelonnette, Castellane and Forcalquier. Inhabitants of Alpes-de-Haute-Provence are called the Bas-Alpins or Bas-Alpines referring to the department of Basses-Alpes which was the former name of the department until 1970.
3
Routes
1325.08
Kilometers
27.34
Hours
Show region map
bouillon Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "bouillon", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Bouillon [French pronunciation: ​[bu.jɔ̃]] (Walloon: Bouyon) is a municipality in Belgium. It lies in the country's Walloon Region and Luxembourg Province. The municipality, which covers 149.09 km², had 5,477 inhabitants, giving a population density of 36.7 inhabitants per km². Bouillon has a few schools, a lycée (middle school) and a gymnasium (high school), banks and a town square. Bouillon Castle still sits above the town centre, and is a popular tourist attraction.
1
Routes
808.11
Kilometers
17.01
Hours
Show region map
couvin Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "couvin", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Couvin (French pronunciation: ​[ku.vɛ̃]; Walloon: Couvén) is a Walloon municipality located in the Belgian province of Namur. On 1 January 2006 the municipality had 13,476 inhabitants. Couvin is the second largest municipality of Belgium by surface area, after Tournai. The total area is 206.93 km², giving a population density of 65 inhabitants per km². The municipality consists of the following sub-municipalities: Couvin proper, Aublain, Boussu-en-Fagne, Brûly, Brûly-de-Pesche, Cul-des-Sarts, Dailly, Frasnes-lez-Couvin, Gonrieux, Mariembourg, Pesche, Petigny, Petite-Chapelle, and Presgaux.
2
Routes
1010.44
Kilometers
21.33
Hours
Show region map
vresse sur semois Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "vresse sur semois", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Vresse-sur-Semois (French pronunciation: ​[vʁɛs.syʁ.sə.mwa]) is a Walloon municipality of Belgium located in the province of Namur. It consists of the former municipalities of Alle, Bagimont, Bohan, Chairière, Laforêt, Membre, Mouzaive, Nafraiture, Orchimont, Pussemange, Sugny, and Vresse. On its south and west, the municipality borders the Ardennes department of France. It is about 10 kilometres (6.2 mi) north of Sedan.
1
Routes
202.33
Kilometers
4.32
Hours
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gedinne Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "gedinne", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Gedinne (French pronunciation: ​[ʒə.din]) is a Walloon municipality located in the Belgian province of Namur. On 1 January 2006 the municipality had 4,405 inhabitants. The total area is 151.56 km², giving a population density of 29 inhabitants per km². It is situated in the Ardennes east of Meuse valley. The western limit of the municipality is the French border. The municipality consists of the town of Gedinne and eleven villages: (number of inhabitants in brackets) Gedinne (1,124, administrative centre) Bourseigne-Neuve (137) Bourseigne-Vieille (106) Houdremont (233) Louette-Saint-Denis (331) Louette-Saint-Pierre (270) Malvoisin (298) Patignies (242) Rienne (736) Sart-Custinne (169) Vencimont (499) Willerzie (319)
1
Routes
371.04
Kilometers
6.62
Hours
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rochefort Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "rochefort", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Rochefort may refer to:
7
Routes
1700.64
Kilometers
37.04
Hours
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Pas de Calais Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Pas de Calais", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Pas-de-Calais (French pronunciation: ​[pɑ d(ə) kalɛ], "strait of Calais"; Picard: Pas-Calés) is a department in northern France named after the French designation of the Strait of Dover, which it borders.
1
Routes
177.57
Kilometers
4.67
Hours
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peruwelz Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "peruwelz", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Royal Excel Mouscron (French pronunciation: ​[mukʁɔ̃], Dutch pronunciation: [muˈskrun]), commonly known as Mouscron or familiarly as REM, is a Belgian professional football club based in Mouscron, currently playing in the First Division A. The team was formed as Royal Mouscron-Péruwelz in the spring of 2010 as a result of the merging between bankrupt R.E. Mouscron and R.R.C. Peruwelz. Its current name was adopted in the summer of 2016.
1
Routes
177.57
Kilometers
4.67
Hours
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houdain lez bavay Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "houdain lez bavay", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Houdain-lez-Bavay is a communes in the Nord department in northern France.
2
Routes
985.68
Kilometers
21.68
Hours
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audregnies Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "audregnies", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Marthe Donas (* 26. October 1885 in Antwerp; † 31. January 1967 in Audregnies) was a Belgian abstract and cubist painter and is recognized as one of the leading figures of Modernism. Donas worked under the pseudonyms Tour d'Onasky, Tour Donas and M. Donas.
5
Routes
1335.78
Kilometers
26.72
Hours
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Auvergne Rhone Alpes Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Auvergne Rhone Alpes", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes or ARA (French pronunciation: [ovɛʁɲ ʁon alp] (listen), Arpitan: Ôvèrgne-Rôno-Ârpes, Occitan: Auvèrnhe Ròse Aups, Italian: Alvernia-Rodano-Alpi) is a region of France created by the territorial reform of French Regions in 2014; it resulted from the merger of Auvergne and Rhône-Alpes. The new region came into effect on 1 January 2016, after the regional elections in December 2015.The region covers an area of more than 69,711 km2 (26,916 sq mi), making it the third largest in metropolitan France, with a population of 7,695,264, second only to Île-de-France.
6
Routes
2473.77
Kilometers
52.21
Hours
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Andorra Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Andorra", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Andorra ( (listen); Catalan: [ənˈdorə]), officially the Principality of Andorra (Catalan: Principat d'Andorra), also called the Principality of the Valleys of Andorra (Catalan: Principat de les Valls d'Andorra), is a sovereign landlocked microstate on the Iberian Peninsula, in the eastern Pyrenees, bordering France to the north and Spain to the south. Believed to have been created by Charlemagne, Andorra was ruled by the Count of Urgell until 988, when it was transferred to the Roman Catholic Diocese of Urgell, and the present principality was formed by a charter in 1278. It is known as a principality as it is a diarchy headed by two Princes: the Catholic Bishop of Urgell in Catalonia, Spain, and the President of France. Andorra is the sixth-smallest nation in Europe, having an area of 468 square kilometres (181 sq mi) and a population of approximately 77,281. The Andorran people are a Romance ethnic group of originally Catalan descent. Andorra is the 16th-smallest country in the world by land and the 11th-smallest by population. Its capital, Andorra la Vella, is the highest capital city in Europe, at an elevation of 1,023 metres (3,356 feet) above sea level. The official language is Catalan; Spanish, Portuguese, and French are also commonly spoken.Tourism in Andorra sees an estimated 10.2 million visitors annually. It is not a member of the European Union, but the euro is its official currency. It has been a member of the United Nations since 1993. In 2013, Andorra had the highest life expectancy in the world at 81 years, according to the Global Burden of Disease Study.
3
Routes
1010.39
Kilometers
21.57
Hours
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basse normandie Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "basse normandie", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Lower Normandy (French: Basse-Normandie, IPA: [bas nɔr.mɑ̃.di]; Norman: Basse-Normaundie) is a former administrative region of France. On 1 January 2016, Lower and Upper Normandy merged becoming one region called Normandy.
1
Routes
362.93
Kilometers
6.77
Hours
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Tarn Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Tarn", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Tarn may refer to:
1
Routes
235.18
Kilometers
4.79
Hours
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Herault Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Herault", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Hérault (French: [eʁo]; Occitan: Erau [eˈɾaw]) is a department in southern France named after the Hérault. It is part of the Occitanie region of the country.
2
Routes
526.98
Kilometers
10.34
Hours
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Aveyron Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Aveyron", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Aveyron (French pronunciation: ​[avɛʁɔ̃]; Occitan: Avairon [abajˈɾu]) is a department located in the north of the Occitanie region of southern France named after the Aveyron River. The inhabitants of the department are known as Aveyronnais or Aveyronnaises. The inhabitants of Rodez are called Ruthénois, based on the first Celtic settlers, the Rutenii.
6
Routes
1645.98
Kilometers
33.73
Hours
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Alpes de Haute Provence Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Alpes de Haute Provence", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Alpes-de-Haute-Provence (French pronunciation: ​[alp.də.ot.pʁɔ.vɑ̃s]; "Alps of Upper Provence"; Occitan: Aups d'Auta Provença) is a department in the Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur region in Southeastern France. Formerly part of the province of Provence, it had a population of 161,916 in 2013. Its main cities are Digne-les-Bains (prefecture), Manosque, Sisteron, Barcelonnette, Castellane and Forcalquier. Inhabitants of Alpes-de-Haute-Provence are called the Bas-Alpins or Bas-Alpines referring to the department of Basses-Alpes which was the former name of the department until 1970.
1
Routes
808.11
Kilometers
17.01
Hours
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rheinland pfalts Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "rheinland pfalts", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Rhineland-Palatinate (German: Rheinland-Pfalz, pronounced [ˈʁaɪ̯nlant ˈp͡falt͡s]) is a state of Germany. Rhineland-Palatinate is located in western Germany covering an area of 19,846 square kilometres (7,663 sq mi) and a population of 4.05 million inhabitants, the seventh-most populous German state. Mainz is the state capital and largest city, while other major cities include Ludwigshafen am Rhein, Koblenz, Trier, Kaiserslautern, and Worms. Rhineland-Palatinate is surrounded by the states of North Rhine-Westphalia, Saarland, Baden-Württemberg, and Hesse. It also borders three foreign countries: France, Luxembourg and Belgium. Rhineland-Palatinate was established in 1946 after World War II from territory of the historically separate regions of the Free State of Prussia, People's State of Hesse, and Bavaria, by the French military administration in Allied-occupied Germany. Rhineland-Palatinate became part of the Federal Republic of Germany in 1949, and shared the country's only border with the Saar Protectorate until it was returned to German control in 1957. Rhineland-Palatinate has since developed its own identity built on its natural and cultural heritage, including the extensive Palatinate winegrowing region, its picturesque landscapes, and many castles and palaces.
10
Routes
2872.55
Kilometers
62.63
Hours
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West Vlaanderen Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "West Vlaanderen", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
West Flanders (Dutch: West-Vlaanderen [ˌʋɛst ˈflaːndərə(n)] (listen); West Flemish: West Vloandern; French: (Province de) Flandre-Occidentale; German: Westflandern) is the westernmost province of the Flemish Region, in Belgium. It is the only coastal Belgian province, facing the North Sea to the north. It has land borders with the Netherlands to the northeast, the Flemish province of East Flanders to the east, the Walloon province of Hainaut in the southeast and France to the west. Its capital is Bruges (Brugge). Other important cities are Kortrijk in the south and Ostend on the coast, Roeselare and Ypres (Ieper). The province has an area of 3,125 km² which is divided into eight administrative districts (arrondissementen) containing 64 municipalities. The North Sea coast of Belgium, an important tourism destination, lies in West Flanders. A tram line runs the length of the coast, from De Panne on the French border to Knokke-Heist on the Dutch border.
11
Routes
3050.12
Kilometers
67.3
Hours
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Nord pas de Calais Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Nord pas de Calais", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Nord-Pas-de-Calais (French pronunciation: [nɔʁ pɑ d(ə) kalɛ] (listen), is a former administrative region of France. Since 1 January 2016, it is part of the new region Hauts-de-France. It consisted of the departments of Nord and Pas-de-Calais. Nord-Pas-de-Calais borders the English Channel (west), the North Sea (northwest), Belgium (north and east) and Picardy (south). The majority of the region was once part of the historical (Southern) Netherlands, but gradually became part of France between 1477 and 1678, particularly during the reign of king Louis XIV. The historical French provinces that preceded Nord-Pas-de-Calais are Artois, French Flanders, French Hainaut and (partially) Picardy. These provincial designations are still frequently used by the inhabitants. With its 330.8 people per km2 on just over 12,414 km2, it is a densely populated region, having some 4.1 million inhabitants, 7% of France's total population, making it the fourth most populous region in the country, 83% of whom live in urban communities. Its administrative centre and largest city is Lille. The second largest city is Calais, which serves as a major continental economic/transportation hub with Dover of Great Britain 42 kilometres (26 mi) away; this makes Nord-Pas-de-Calais the closest continental European connection to the Great Britain. Other major towns include Valenciennes, Lens, Douai, Béthune, Dunkirk, Maubeuge, Boulogne, Arras, Cambrai and Saint-Omer. Numerous films, like Bienvenue chez les Ch'tis.
La Seu dUrgell to Carcassonne via Andorra
13-02-2019
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Rondrit Gorges du Verdon vanuit Castellane
05-02-2019
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Saint Nazaire to Concarneau
08-01-2019
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Carcassonne to Millau Viaduct
14-02-2019
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rondrit Moere Hubersent en terug x Doeverentreffen 2012 lang
21-02-2017
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AD F Soldeu Aix les Thermes Lacourt Soldeu 302 km
28-12-2018
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AD F Soldeu Puilaurens Sournia Soldeu 299km
27-12-2018
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Sos del Rey Catolico to Pau over the Pyrenees
05-01-2019
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Round trip from Honfleur River Seine bridges and ferries
20-12-2018
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De Kust van Normandie
14-02-2019
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