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The prettiest verified routes in France

MyRoute-app helps you with planning your dream journey! All routes on the page have been verified by our Route Experts. De routes are categorized in regions, when you click on 'view region' you will see all verified routes for that region that are free to use.
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12
Amount of active Route Experts (worldwide)
84
Amount of routes reviewd by Route Experts (worldwide)
611
Amount of downloaded routes (worldwide)
1318
Amount of visits (France)
20
Amount of routes verified by Route Experts (France)
76
Amount of downloaded routes (France)
2
Routes
506.87
Kilometers
10.92
Hours
Show region map
Wallonie Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Wallonie", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Wallonia (French: Wallonie [walɔni], German: Wallonie(n), Dutch: Wallonië [ʋaːˈloːnijə] (listen), Walloon: Walonreye Walloon pronunciation: ​[walɔnʀɛj], Luxembourgish: Wallounien, [vɑˈləʊ̯niə̯n]) is a region of Belgium. As the southern portion of the country, Wallonia is primarily French-speaking, and accounts for 55% of the territory of Belgium, and a third of its population. The Walloon Region was not merged with the French Community of Belgium which is the political entity that is responsible for matters related mainly to culture and education; the French Community of Belgium therefore encompasses both Wallonia and the majority French-Speaking Brussels-Capital Region. The German-speaking minority in the east of Wallonia results from WWI and the subsequent annexation of three cantons which were initially part of the former German empire. This community represents approximately 2% of the Belgian population. It forms the German-speaking Community of Belgium, which has its own government and parliament for culture-related issues. During the industrial revolution, Wallonia was second only to the United Kingdom in industrialization, capitalizing on its extensive deposits of coal and iron. This brought the region wealth, and from the beginning of the 19th to the middle of the 20th century, Wallonia was the more prosperous half of Belgium. Since World War II, the importance of heavy industry has greatly diminished, and the Flemish Region surpassed Wallonia in wealth, as Wallonia declined economically. Wallonia now suffers from high unemployment and has a significantly lower GDP per capita than Flanders. The economic inequalities and linguistic divide between the two are major sources of political conflicts in Belgium and is a major factor in Flemish separatism. The capital of Wallonia is Namur, but the city with the greatest population is Charleroi. Most of Wallonia's major cities and two-thirds of its population lie along the Sambre and Meuse valley, the former industrial backbone of Belgium. To the north lies the Central Belgian Plateau, which like Flanders, is relatively flat and agriculturally fertile. In the south-east lie the Ardennes, hilly and sparsely populated. Wallonia borders Flanders and the Netherlands (Limburg) in the north, France (Grand Est and Hauts-de-France) to the south and west, and Germany (North Rhine-Westphalia and Rhineland-Palatinate) and Luxembourg (Capellen, Clervaux, Esch-sur-Alzette, Redange and Wiltz) to the east. Wallonia has been a member of the Organisation Internationale de la Francophonie since 1980.
1
Routes
291.16
Kilometers
5.5
Hours
Show region map
Grand Est Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Grand Est", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Grand Est (French pronunciation: [ɡʁɑ̃t‿ɛst] (listen); English: Great East, German: Großer Osten—both in the Alsatian and the Lorraine Franconian dialect), previously Alsace-Champagne-Ardenne-Lorraine (ACAL or less commonly, ALCA), is an administrative region in eastern France. It superseded three former administrative regions—Alsace, Champagne-Ardenne, and Lorraine—on 1 January 2016, as a result of territorial reform which was passed by the French legislature in 2014. Alsace-Champagne-Ardenne-Lorraine was a provisional name, created by hyphenating the merged regions in alphabetical order; its regional council had to approve a new name for the region by 1 July 2016. France's Conseil d'État approved Grand Est as the new name of the region on 28 September 2016, effective 30 September 2016. The administrative capital and largest city is Strasbourg.
1
Routes
201
Kilometers
4.31
Hours
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Normandie Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Normandie", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The SS Normandie was an ocean liner built in Saint-Nazaire, France, for the French Line Compagnie Générale Transatlantique (CGT). She entered service in 1935 as the largest and fastest passenger ship afloat; she is still the most powerful steam turbo-electric-propelled passenger ship ever built.Her novel design and lavish interiors led many to consider her the greatest of ocean liners. Despite this, she was not a commercial success and relied partly on government subsidy to operate. During service as the flagship of the CGT, she made 139 westbound transatlantic crossings from her home port of Le Havre to New York. Normandie held the Blue Riband for the fastest transatlantic crossing at several points during her service career, during which the RMS Queen Mary was her main rival. During World War II, Normandie was seized by U.S. authorities at New York and renamed USS Lafayette. In 1942, the liner caught fire while being converted to a troopship, capsized onto her port side and came to rest on the mud of the Hudson River at Pier 88, the site of the current New York Passenger Ship Terminal. Although salvaged at great expense, restoration was deemed too costly and she was scrapped in October 1946.
1
Routes
291.16
Kilometers
5.5
Hours
Show region map
Alsace Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Alsace", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Alsace (; French: [alzas] (listen); Alsatian: ’s Elsass [ˈɛlsɑs]; German: Elsass [ˈɛlzas] (listen); Latin: Alsatia) is a cultural and historical region in eastern France, on the west bank of the upper Rhine next to Germany and Switzerland. From 1982 to 2016, Alsace was the smallest administrative région in metropolitan France, consisting of the Bas-Rhin and Haut-Rhin departments. Territorial reform passed by the French legislature in 2014 resulted in the merger of the Alsace administrative region with Champagne-Ardenne and Lorraine to form Grand Est. Alsatian is an Alemannic dialect closely related to Swabian and Swiss German, although since World War II most Alsatians primarily speak French. Internal and international migration since 1945 has also changed the ethnolinguistic composition of Alsace. For more than 300 years, from the Thirty Years' War to World War II, the political status of Alsace was heavily contested between France and various German states in wars and diplomatic conferences. The economic and cultural capital as well as largest city of Alsace is Strasbourg. The city is the seat of several international organizations and bodies.
1
Routes
291.16
Kilometers
5.5
Hours
Show region map
Rijnland Palts Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Rijnland Palts", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The following table contains a list of Dutch exonyms for places located in Germany. The places can be sorted alphabetically by either their Dutch or English name by clicking on the arrows (▲▼) at the top of the respective columns..
18
Routes
4317.27
Kilometers
94.59
Hours
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Nord Pas de Calais Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Nord Pas de Calais", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Nord-Pas-de-Calais (French pronunciation: [nɔʁ pɑ d(ə) kalɛ] (listen), is a former administrative region of France. Since 1 January 2016, it is part of the new region Hauts-de-France. It consisted of the departments of Nord and Pas-de-Calais. Nord-Pas-de-Calais borders the English Channel (west), the North Sea (northwest), Belgium (north and east) and Picardy (south). The majority of the region was once part of the historical (Southern) Netherlands, but gradually became part of France between 1477 and 1678, particularly during the reign of king Louis XIV. The historical French provinces that preceded Nord-Pas-de-Calais are Artois, French Flanders, French Hainaut and (partially) Picardy. These provincial designations are still frequently used by the inhabitants. With its 330.8 people per km2 on just over 12,414 km2, it is a densely populated region, having some 4.1 million inhabitants, 7% of France's total population, making it the fourth most populous region in the country, 83% of whom live in urban communities. Its administrative centre and largest city is Lille. The second largest city is Calais, which serves as a major continental economic/transportation hub with Dover of Great Britain 42 kilometres (26 mi) away; this makes Nord-Pas-de-Calais the closest continental European connection to the Great Britain. Other major towns include Valenciennes, Lens, Douai, Béthune, Dunkirk, Maubeuge, Boulogne, Arras, Cambrai and Saint-Omer. Numerous films, like Bienvenue chez les Ch'tis.
1
Routes
291.16
Kilometers
5.5
Hours
Show region map
rijnland pfaltz Open region
18
Routes
4317.27
Kilometers
94.59
Hours
Show region map
Nord Pas de Calais Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Nord Pas de Calais", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Nord-Pas-de-Calais (French pronunciation: [nɔʁ pɑ d(ə) kalɛ] (listen), is a former administrative region of France. Since 1 January 2016, it is part of the new region Hauts-de-France. It consisted of the departments of Nord and Pas-de-Calais. Nord-Pas-de-Calais borders the English Channel (west), the North Sea (northwest), Belgium (north and east) and Picardy (south). The majority of the region was once part of the historical (Southern) Netherlands, but gradually became part of France between 1477 and 1678, particularly during the reign of king Louis XIV. The historical French provinces that preceded Nord-Pas-de-Calais are Artois, French Flanders, French Hainaut and (partially) Picardy. These provincial designations are still frequently used by the inhabitants. With its 330.8 people per km2 on just over 12,414 km2, it is a densely populated region, having some 4.1 million inhabitants, 7% of France's total population, making it the fourth most populous region in the country, 83% of whom live in urban communities. Its administrative centre and largest city is Lille. The second largest city is Calais, which serves as a major continental economic/transportation hub with Dover of Great Britain 42 kilometres (26 mi) away; this makes Nord-Pas-de-Calais the closest continental European connection to the Great Britain. Other major towns include Valenciennes, Lens, Douai, Béthune, Dunkirk, Maubeuge, Boulogne, Arras, Cambrai and Saint-Omer. Numerous films, like Bienvenue chez les Ch'tis.
18
Routes
4317.27
Kilometers
94.59
Hours
Show region map
West Vlaanderen Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "West Vlaanderen", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
West Flanders (Dutch: West-Vlaanderen [ˌʋɛst ˈflaːndərə(n)] (listen); West Flemish: West Vloandern; French: (Province de) Flandre-Occidentale; German: Westflandern) is the westernmost province of the Flemish Region, in Belgium. It is the only coastal Belgian province, facing the North Sea to the north. It has land borders with the Netherlands to the northeast, the Flemish province of East Flanders to the east, the Walloon province of Hainaut in the southeast and France to the west. Its capital is Bruges (Brugge). Other important cities are Kortrijk in the south and Ostend on the coast, Roeselare and Ypres (Ieper). The province has an area of 3,125 km² which is divided into eight administrative districts (arrondissementen) containing 64 municipalities. The North Sea coast of Belgium, an important tourism destination, lies in West Flanders. A tram line runs the length of the coast, from De Panne on the French border to Knokke-Heist on the Dutch border.
B-F Moere_Tournehem-sur-la-Hem en terug (Doeverentreffen 2018 kort) 210 km
02-05-2018
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B-F Moere_Blaringhem en terug (Doeverentreffen 2017 kort) 194 km
05-11-2018
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B-F Moere_Lebiez_Blaringhem en terug (Doeverentreffen 2017 lang) 313 km
24-05-2017
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B-F Moere_Croisette_Boeseghem en terug (Doeverentreffen 2013 lang) 288 km
21-02-2017
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B-F Moere_Wissant_Licques en terug (Doeverentreffen 2016 lang) 292 km
21-02-2017
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B-F Moere_Nordausques en terug (Doeverentreffen 2016 kort) 193 km
05-11-2018
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B-F Moere_Roquetoire en terug (Doeverentreffen 2013 kort) 189 km
21-11-2018
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B-F Moere_Nieuwerleet en terug (Doeverentreffen 2015 kort) 187 km
06-11-2018
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B-F Moere_Saint-Omer_Moere (Doeverentreffen 2009) 193 km
21-02-2017
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B-F Moere_Longfossé_Tournehem-sur-la-Hem en terug (Doeverentreffen 2018 lang) 310 km
02-11-2018
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