Back to country overview
DrivingCyclingBy foot

The prettiest verified routes in United Kingdom

MyRoute-app helps you with planning your dream journey! All routes on the page have been verified by our Route Experts. De routes are categorized in regions, when you click on 'view region' you will see all verified routes for that region that are free to use.
Register More info
Contribute to this library?
12
Amount of active Route Experts (worldwide)
84
Amount of routes reviewd by Route Experts (worldwide)
611
Amount of downloaded routes (worldwide)
768
Amount of visits (United Kingdom)
13
Amount of routes verified by Route Experts (United Kingdom)
60
Amount of downloaded routes (United Kingdom)
7
Routes
2045.99
Kilometers
35.16
Hours
Show region map
Highland Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Highland", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Highlands or uplands are any mountainous region or elevated mountainous plateau. Generally speaking, upland (or uplands) refers to ranges of hills, typically up to 500–600 m. Highland (or highlands) is usually reserved for ranges of low mountains.
1
Routes
249.32
Kilometers
4.85
Hours
Show region map
City of Edinburgh Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "City of Edinburgh", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Edinburgh ( (listen); Scottish Gaelic: Dùn Èideann [ˈt̪uːn ˈeːtʲən̪ˠ]; Scots: Edinburgh) is the capital city of Scotland and one of its 32 council areas. Historically part of the county of Midlothian (or Edinburghshire), it is located in Lothian on the Firth of Forth's southern shore. Recognised as the capital of Scotland since at least the 15th century, Edinburgh is the seat of the Scottish Government, the Scottish Parliament and the supreme courts of Scotland. The city's Palace of Holyroodhouse is the official residence of the monarch in Scotland. The city has long been a centre of education, particularly in the fields of medicine, Scots law, literature, the sciences and engineering. It is the second largest financial centre in the United Kingdom (after London) and the city's historical and cultural attractions have made it the United Kingdom's second most popular tourist destination (likewise after London), attracting over one million overseas visitors each year.Edinburgh is Scotland's second most populous city and the seventh most populous in the United Kingdom. The official population estimates are 464,990 (2012) for the Locality of Edinburgh (Edinburgh pre 1975 regionalisation plus Currie and Balerno), 513,210 (2017) for the City of Edinburgh, and 1,339,380 (2014) for the city region. Edinburgh lies at the heart of the Edinburgh and South East Scotland city region comprising East Lothian, Edinburgh, Fife, Midlothian, Scottish Borders and West Lothian.The city is the annual venue of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland. It is home to national institutions such as the National Museum of Scotland, the National Library of Scotland and the Scottish National Gallery. The University of Edinburgh, founded in 1582 and now one of four in the city, is placed 18th in the QS World University Rankings for 2019. The city is also famous for the Edinburgh International Festival and the Fringe, the latter being the world's largest annual international arts festival. Historic sites in Edinburgh include Edinburgh Castle, the Palace of Holyroodhouse, the churches of St. Giles, Greyfriars and the Canongate, and the extensive Georgian New Town, built in the 18th/19th centuries. Edinburgh's Old Town and New Town together are listed as a UNESCO World Heritage site, which has been managed by Edinburgh World Heritage since 1999.
7
Routes
2045.99
Kilometers
35.16
Hours
Show region map
Scottish Highlands Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Scottish Highlands", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The Highlands (Scots: the Hielands; Scottish Gaelic: A’ Ghàidhealtachd [ə ˈɣɛːəl̪ˠt̪ʰəxk], "the place of the Gaels") is a historic region of Scotland. Culturally, the Highlands and the Lowlands diverged from the later Middle Ages into the modern period, when Lowland Scots replaced Scottish Gaelic throughout most of the Lowlands. The term is also used for the area north and west of the Highland Boundary Fault, although the exact boundaries are not clearly defined, particularly to the east. The Great Glen divides the Grampian Mountains to the southeast from the Northwest Highlands. The Scottish Gaelic name of A' Ghàidhealtachd literally means "the place of the Gaels" and traditionally, from a Gaelic-speaking point of view, includes both the Western Isles and the Highlands. The area is very sparsely populated, with many mountain ranges dominating the region, and includes the highest mountain in the British Isles, Ben Nevis. Before the 19th century the Highlands was home to a much larger population, but from circa 1841 and for the next 160 years, the natural increase in population was exceeded by emigration (mostly to Canada, the USA and Australia) and migration to the industrial cities of Scotland and England. The area is now one of the most sparsely populated in Europe. At 9.1 per km2 (23.6 per square mile) in 2012, the population density in the Highlands and Islands is less than one seventh of Scotland's as a whole, comparable with that of Bolivia, Chad and Russia.The Highland Council is the administrative body for much of the Highlands, with its administrative centre at Inverness. However, the Highlands also includes parts of the council areas of Aberdeenshire, Angus, Argyll and Bute, Moray, North Ayrshire, Perth and Kinross, Stirling and West Dunbartonshire. The Scottish highlands is the only area in the British Isles to have the taiga biome as it features concentrated populations of Scots pine forest: see Caledonian Forest.
1
Routes
249.32
Kilometers
4.85
Hours
Show region map
Falkirk Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Falkirk", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Falkirk (; Scots: The Fawkirk; Scottish Gaelic: An Eaglais Bhreac) is a large town in the Central Lowlands of Scotland, historically within the county of Stirlingshire. It lies in the Forth Valley, 23.3 miles (37.5 km) north-west of Edinburgh and 20.5 miles (33.0 km) north-east of Glasgow. Falkirk had a resident population of 32,422 at the 2001 UK Census. The population of the town had risen to 34,570 according to a 2008 estimate, making it the 20th most populous settlement in Scotland. Falkirk is the main town and administrative centre of the Falkirk council area, which has an overall population of 156,800 and inholds the nearby towns of Grangemouth, Bo'ness, Denny, Larbert and Stenhousemuir. The town is at the junction of the Forth and Clyde and Union Canals, a location which proved key to its growth as a centre of heavy industry during the Industrial Revolution. In the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, Falkirk was at the centre of the iron and steel industry, underpinned by the Carron Company in nearby Carron. The company was responsible for making carronades for the Royal Navy and later manufactured pillar boxes. Within the last fifty years, heavy industry has waned, and the economy relies increasingly on retail and tourism. Despite this, Falkirk remains the home of many international companies like Alexander Dennis; the largest bus production company in the United Kingdom. Falkirk has a long association with the publishing industry. The company now known as Johnston Press was established in the town in 1846. The company, now based in Edinburgh, produces the Falkirk Herald, the largest selling weekly newspaper in Scotland. Attractions in and around Falkirk include the Falkirk Wheel, The Helix, The Kelpies, Callendar House and Park and remnants of the Antonine Wall. In a 2011 poll conducted by STV, it was voted as Scotland's most beautiful town, ahead of Perth and Stirling in second and third place respectively..
1
Routes
249.32
Kilometers
4.85
Hours
Show region map
westlothian Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "westlothian", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The West Lothian question, also known as the English question, refers to whether MPs from Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales, sitting in the House of Commons of the United Kingdom, should be able to vote on matters that affect only England, while MPs from England are unable to vote on matters that have been devolved to the Northern Ireland Assembly, the Scottish Parliament and the Welsh Assembly. The term "West Lothian question" was coined by Enoch Powell MP in 1977 after Tam Dalyell, the Labour MP for the Scottish constituency of West Lothian, raised the matter repeatedly in House of Commons debates on devolution.In 2011 the Government of the United Kingdom set up a commission to examine the question. The Commission on the consequences of devolution for the House of Commons, chaired by former Clerk of the House of Commons Sir William McKay, published a report in 2013 which proposed various procedural changes, including that legislation which affects only England should require the support of a majority of MPs representing English constituencies ("English votes for English laws"). Following the election of a Conservative government in the 2015 general election, new parliamentary procedures and a Legislative Grand Committee were enacted.
2
Routes
429.12
Kilometers
7.1
Hours
Show region map
Tyne Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Tyne", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Tyne is an Irish surname. Tyne may also refer to:
1
Routes
249.32
Kilometers
4.85
Hours
Show region map
City of Dundee Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "City of Dundee", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Dundee ( (listen); Scottish Gaelic: Dùn Dè [ˈt̪uːn tʲeː]) is Scotland's fourth-largest city and the 51st-most-populous built-up area in the United Kingdom. The mid-year population estimate for 2016 was 148,270, giving Dundee a population density of 2,478/km2 or 6,420/sq mi, the second-highest in Scotland. It lies within the eastern central Lowlands on the north bank of the Firth of Tay, which feeds into the North Sea. Under the name of Dundee City (officially the City of Dundee), it forms one of the 32 council areas used for local government in Scotland. Historically part of Angus, the city developed into a burgh in the late 12th century and established itself as an important east coast trading port. Rapid expansion was brought on by the Industrial Revolution, particularly in the 19th century when Dundee was the centre of the global jute industry. This, along with its other major industries gave Dundee its epithet as the city of "jute, jam and journalism". Today, Dundee is promoted as "One City, Many Discoveries" in honour of Dundee's history of scientific activities and of the RRS Discovery, Robert Falcon Scott's Antarctic exploration vessel, which was built in Dundee and is now berthed at Discovery Point. Biomedical and technological industries have arrived since the 1980s, and the city now accounts for 10% of the United Kingdom's digital-entertainment industry. Dundee has two universities — the University of Dundee and the Abertay University. In 2014 Dundee was recognised by the United Nations as the UK's first UNESCO City of Design for its diverse contributions to fields including medical research, comics and video games.A unique feature of Dundee is that its two professional football clubs, Dundee United and Dundee F.C., have stadiums all but adjacent to each other.With the decline of traditional industry, the city has adopted a plan to regenerate and reinvent itself as a cultural centre. In pursuit of this, a £1 billion master plan to regenerate and to reconnect the Waterfront to the city centre started in 2001 and is expected to be completed within a 30-year period. The V&A Dundee – the first branch of the V&A to operate outside of London – is the main centre piece of the waterfront project.In recent years, Dundee's international profile has risen. GQ magazine named Dundee the 'Coolest Little City In Britain' in 2015 and The Wall Street Journal ranked Dundee at number 5 on its 'Worldwide Hot Destinations' list for 2018.
7
Routes
2045.99
Kilometers
35.16
Hours
Show region map
Scottish Highlands Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Scottish Highlands", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The Highlands (Scots: the Hielands; Scottish Gaelic: A’ Ghàidhealtachd [ə ˈɣɛːəl̪ˠt̪ʰəxk], "the place of the Gaels") is a historic region of Scotland. Culturally, the Highlands and the Lowlands diverged from the later Middle Ages into the modern period, when Lowland Scots replaced Scottish Gaelic throughout most of the Lowlands. The term is also used for the area north and west of the Highland Boundary Fault, although the exact boundaries are not clearly defined, particularly to the east. The Great Glen divides the Grampian Mountains to the southeast from the Northwest Highlands. The Scottish Gaelic name of A' Ghàidhealtachd literally means "the place of the Gaels" and traditionally, from a Gaelic-speaking point of view, includes both the Western Isles and the Highlands. The area is very sparsely populated, with many mountain ranges dominating the region, and includes the highest mountain in the British Isles, Ben Nevis. Before the 19th century the Highlands was home to a much larger population, but from circa 1841 and for the next 160 years, the natural increase in population was exceeded by emigration (mostly to Canada, the USA and Australia) and migration to the industrial cities of Scotland and England. The area is now one of the most sparsely populated in Europe. At 9.1 per km2 (23.6 per square mile) in 2012, the population density in the Highlands and Islands is less than one seventh of Scotland's as a whole, comparable with that of Bolivia, Chad and Russia.The Highland Council is the administrative body for much of the Highlands, with its administrative centre at Inverness. However, the Highlands also includes parts of the council areas of Aberdeenshire, Angus, Argyll and Bute, Moray, North Ayrshire, Perth and Kinross, Stirling and West Dunbartonshire. The Scottish highlands is the only area in the British Isles to have the taiga biome as it features concentrated populations of Scots pine forest: see Caledonian Forest.
2
Routes
531.26
Kilometers
11.16
Hours
Show region map
Gloucestershire Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Gloucestershire", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Gloucestershire ( (listen), (listen); formerly abbreviated as Gloucs. in print but now often as Glos.) is a county in South West England. The county comprises part of the Cotswold Hills, part of the flat fertile valley of the River Severn, and the entire Forest of Dean. The county town is the city of Gloucester, and other principal towns include Cheltenham, Stroud, Tewkesbury, Cirencester and Dursley. Gloucestershire borders Herefordshire to the northwest, Wiltshire to the south, Bristol and Somerset to the south west, Worcestershire to the north, Oxfordshire to the east, Warwickshire to the northeast, and the Welsh county of Monmouthshire to the west.
2
Routes
498.31
Kilometers
9.2
Hours
Show region map
Midlothian Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Midlothian", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Midlothian (; Scots: Midlowden; Scottish Gaelic: Meadhan Lodainn) is one of the 32 council areas of Scotland, UK. It borders Edinburgh, East Lothian and the Scottish Borders council areas. Midlothian was also the name of a historic county formed in the Middle Ages. The county included Edinburgh and was formerly known as Edinburghshire, or more formally as the County of Edinburgh, until 1890. The historic county remains a lieutenancy area and a registration county for which purposes Edinburgh is included. Midlothian Council area was created in 1996, under the Local Government etc. (Scotland) Act 1994, with the boundaries of the Midlothian district of the Lothian region. The district had been created in 1975, under the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973, and it consisted of the local government county of Midlothian, minus the burgh of Musselburgh – with the areas of Inveresk, Wallyford and Whitecraig being lost to East Lothian, the Calders (East Calder, Midcalder and West Calder) and the Midlothian part of Livingston to West Lothian, Heriot and Stow parishes to the Ettrick and Lauderdale district of Borders Region, and Currie, Balerno, Ratho and Newbridge to Edinburgh.
2
Routes
525.87
Kilometers
9.59
Hours
Show region map
Perth and Kinross Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Perth and Kinross", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Perth and Kinross (Scots: Pairth an Kinross; Scottish Gaelic: Peairt agus Ceann Rois) is one of the 32 council areas of Scotland and a Lieutenancy Area. It borders onto the Aberdeenshire, Angus, Argyll and Bute, Clackmannanshire, Dundee, Fife, Highland and Stirling council areas. Perth is the administrative centre. With the exception of a large area of south-western Perthshire, the council area mostly corresponds to the historic counties of Perthshire and Kinross-shire. Perthshire and Kinross-shire shared a joint county council from 1929 until 1975. The area formed a single local government district in 1975 within the Tayside region under the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973, and was then reconstituted as a unitary authority (with a minor boundary adjustment) in 1996 by the Local Government etc. (Scotland) Act 1994.
2
Routes
429.12
Kilometers
7.1
Hours
Show region map
Northumberland Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Northumberland", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Northumberland (; abbreviated Northd) is a county in North East England. The northernmost county of England, it borders Cumbria to the west, County Durham and Tyne and Wear to the south and the Scottish Borders to the north. To the east is the North Sea coastline with a 64 miles (103 km) path. The county town is Alnwick, although the County council is based in Morpeth.The county of Northumberland included Newcastle upon Tyne until 1400, when the city became a county of itself. Northumberland expanded greatly in the Tudor period, annexing Berwick-upon-Tweed in 1482, Tynedale in 1495, Tynemouth in 1536, Redesdale around 1542 and Hexhamshire in 1572. Islandshire, Bedlingtonshire and Norhamshire were incorporated into Northumberland in 1844. Tynemouth and other settlements in North Tyneside were transferred to Tyne and Wear in 1974 under the Local Government Act 1972. Lying on the Anglo-Scottish border, Northumberland has been the site of a number of battles. The county is noted for its undeveloped landscape of high moorland, now largely protected as the Northumberland National Park. Northumberland is the least densely populated county in England, with only 62 people per square kilometre.
1
Routes
269.86
Kilometers
6.04
Hours
Show region map
Warwickshire Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Warwickshire", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Warwickshire ( (listen); postal abbreviation Warks.) is a landlocked county in the West Midlands region of England. The county town is Warwick, although the largest town is Nuneaton. The county is famous for being the birthplace of William Shakespeare.The county is divided into five districts of North Warwickshire, Nuneaton and Bedworth, Rugby, Warwick and Stratford-on-Avon. The current county boundaries were set in 1974 by the Local Government Act 1972. The historic county boundaries include Coventry and Solihull, as well as much of Birmingham.
2
Routes
429.12
Kilometers
7.1
Hours
Show region map
Northumberland Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Northumberland", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Northumberland (; abbreviated Northd) is a county in North East England. The northernmost county of England, it borders Cumbria to the west, County Durham and Tyne and Wear to the south and the Scottish Borders to the north. To the east is the North Sea coastline with a 64 miles (103 km) path. The county town is Alnwick, although the County council is based in Morpeth.The county of Northumberland included Newcastle upon Tyne until 1400, when the city became a county of itself. Northumberland expanded greatly in the Tudor period, annexing Berwick-upon-Tweed in 1482, Tynedale in 1495, Tynemouth in 1536, Redesdale around 1542 and Hexhamshire in 1572. Islandshire, Bedlingtonshire and Norhamshire were incorporated into Northumberland in 1844. Tynemouth and other settlements in North Tyneside were transferred to Tyne and Wear in 1974 under the Local Government Act 1972. Lying on the Anglo-Scottish border, Northumberland has been the site of a number of battles. The county is noted for its undeveloped landscape of high moorland, now largely protected as the Northumberland National Park. Northumberland is the least densely populated county in England, with only 62 people per square kilometre.
1
Routes
248.99
Kilometers
4.36
Hours
Show region map
Scottish Borders Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Scottish Borders", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The Scottish Borders (Scots: The Mairches, lit. "The Marches"; Scottish Gaelic: Crìochan na h-Alba) is one of 32 council areas of Scotland. It borders the City of Edinburgh, Dumfries and Galloway, East Lothian, Midlothian, South Lanarkshire, West Lothian and, to the south-west, south and east, the English counties of Cumbria and Northumberland. The administrative centre of the area is Newtown St Boswells. The term Scottish Borders is also used to designate the areas of southern Scotland and northern England that bound the Anglo-Scottish border.
2
Routes
498.31
Kilometers
9.2
Hours
Show region map
Midlothian Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Midlothian", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Midlothian (; Scots: Midlowden; Scottish Gaelic: Meadhan Lodainn) is one of the 32 council areas of Scotland, UK. It borders Edinburgh, East Lothian and the Scottish Borders council areas. Midlothian was also the name of a historic county formed in the Middle Ages. The county included Edinburgh and was formerly known as Edinburghshire, or more formally as the County of Edinburgh, until 1890. The historic county remains a lieutenancy area and a registration county for which purposes Edinburgh is included. Midlothian Council area was created in 1996, under the Local Government etc. (Scotland) Act 1994, with the boundaries of the Midlothian district of the Lothian region. The district had been created in 1975, under the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973, and it consisted of the local government county of Midlothian, minus the burgh of Musselburgh – with the areas of Inveresk, Wallyford and Whitecraig being lost to East Lothian, the Calders (East Calder, Midcalder and West Calder) and the Midlothian part of Livingston to West Lothian, Heriot and Stow parishes to the Ettrick and Lauderdale district of Borders Region, and Currie, Balerno, Ratho and Newbridge to Edinburgh.
2
Routes
498.31
Kilometers
9.2
Hours
Show region map
midlothian Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "midlothian", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Midlothian (; Scots: Midlowden; Scottish Gaelic: Meadhan Lodainn) is one of the 32 council areas of Scotland, UK. It borders Edinburgh, East Lothian and the Scottish Borders council areas. Midlothian was also the name of a historic county formed in the Middle Ages. The county included Edinburgh and was formerly known as Edinburghshire, or more formally as the County of Edinburgh, until 1890. The historic county remains a lieutenancy area and a registration county for which purposes Edinburgh is included. Midlothian Council area was created in 1996, under the Local Government etc. (Scotland) Act 1994, with the boundaries of the Midlothian district of the Lothian region. The district had been created in 1975, under the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973, and it consisted of the local government county of Midlothian, minus the burgh of Musselburgh – with the areas of Inveresk, Wallyford and Whitecraig being lost to East Lothian, the Calders (East Calder, Midcalder and West Calder) and the Midlothian part of Livingston to West Lothian, Heriot and Stow parishes to the Ettrick and Lauderdale district of Borders Region, and Currie, Balerno, Ratho and Newbridge to Edinburgh.
2
Routes
531.26
Kilometers
11.16
Hours
Show region map
Gloucestershire Oxfordshire Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Gloucestershire Oxfordshire", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Gloucestershire ( (listen), (listen); formerly abbreviated as Gloucs. in print but now often as Glos.) is a county in South West England. The county comprises part of the Cotswold Hills, part of the flat fertile valley of the River Severn, and the entire Forest of Dean. The county town is the city of Gloucester, and other principal towns include Cheltenham, Stroud, Tewkesbury, Cirencester and Dursley. Gloucestershire borders Herefordshire to the northwest, Wiltshire to the south, Bristol and Somerset to the south west, Worcestershire to the north, Oxfordshire to the east, Warwickshire to the northeast, and the Welsh county of Monmouthshire to the west.
1
Routes
249.32
Kilometers
4.85
Hours
Show region map
Fife Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Fife", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Fife (; Scottish Gaelic: Fìobha) is a council area and historic county of Scotland. It is situated between the Firth of Tay and the Firth of Forth, with inland boundaries to Perth and Kinross and Clackmannanshire. By custom it is widely held to have been one of the major Pictish kingdoms, known as Fib, and is still commonly known as the Kingdom of Fife within Scotland. Fife is one of the six local authorities part of the Edinburgh and South East Scotland city region. It is a lieutenancy area, and was a county of Scotland until 1975. It was very occasionally known by the anglicisation Fifeshire in old documents and maps compiled by English cartographers and authors. A person from Fife is known as a Fifer. Fife was a local government region divided into three districts: Dunfermline, Kirkcaldy and North-East Fife. Since 1996 the functions of the district councils have been exercised by the unitary Fife Council. Fife is Scotland's third largest local authority area by population. It has a resident population of just under 367,000, over a third of whom live in the three principal towns of Dunfermline, Kirkcaldy and Glenrothes. The historic town of St Andrews is located on the northeast coast of Fife. It is well known for the University of St Andrews, one of the most ancient universities in the world and is renowned as the home of golf.
1
Routes
155.79
Kilometers
3.86
Hours
Show region map
Southwest England Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Southwest England", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
South West England is one of nine official regions of England. It is the largest in area, covering 9,200 square miles (23,800 km2), and consists of the counties of Gloucestershire, Bristol, Wiltshire, Somerset, Dorset, Devon and Cornwall, as well as the Isles of Scilly. Five million people live in South West England. The region includes the West Country and much of the ancient kingdom of Wessex. The largest city is Bristol. Other major urban centres include Plymouth, Swindon, Gloucester, Cheltenham, Exeter, Bath, Torbay, and the South East Dorset conurbation which includes Bournemouth, Poole and Christchurch. There are eight cities: Salisbury, Bath, Wells, Bristol, Gloucester, Exeter, Plymouth and Truro. It includes two entire national parks, Dartmoor and Exmoor (a small part of the New Forest is also within the region); and four World Heritage Sites, including Stonehenge and the Jurassic Coast. The northern part of Gloucestershire, near Chipping Campden, is as close to the Scottish border as it is to the tip of Cornwall. The region has by far the longest coastline of any English region. The region is at the first-level of NUTS for Eurostat purposes. Key data and facts about the region are produced by the South West Observatory. Following the abolition of the South West Regional Assembly and Government Office, local government co-ordination across the region is now undertaken by South West Councils. The region is known for its rich folklore, including the legend of King Arthur and Glastonbury Tor, as well as its traditions and customs. Cornwall has its own language, Cornish, and some regard it as a Celtic nation. The South West is known for Cheddar cheese, which originated in the Somerset village of Cheddar; Devon cream teas, crabs, Cornish pasties, and cider. It is home to the Eden Project, Aardman Animations, the Glastonbury Festival, the Bristol International Balloon Fiesta, trip hop music and Cornwall's surfing beaches. The region has also been home to some of Britain's most renowned writers, including Daphne du Maurier and Agatha Christie, both of whom set many of their works here, and the South West is also the location of Thomas Hardy's Wessex, the setting for many of his best-known novels.
2
Routes
525.87
Kilometers
9.59
Hours
Show region map
Perth and Kinross Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Perth and Kinross", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Perth and Kinross (Scots: Pairth an Kinross; Scottish Gaelic: Peairt agus Ceann Rois) is one of the 32 council areas of Scotland and a Lieutenancy Area. It borders onto the Aberdeenshire, Angus, Argyll and Bute, Clackmannanshire, Dundee, Fife, Highland and Stirling council areas. Perth is the administrative centre. With the exception of a large area of south-western Perthshire, the council area mostly corresponds to the historic counties of Perthshire and Kinross-shire. Perthshire and Kinross-shire shared a joint county council from 1929 until 1975. The area formed a single local government district in 1975 within the Tayside region under the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973, and was then reconstituted as a unitary authority (with a minor boundary adjustment) in 1996 by the Local Government etc. (Scotland) Act 1994.
1
Routes
269.86
Kilometers
6.04
Hours
Show region map
Oxfordshire Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Oxfordshire", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Oxfordshire (abbreviated Oxon, from Oxonium, the Latin name for Oxford) is a county in South East England. The ceremonial county borders Warwickshire to the north-west, Northamptonshire to the north-east, Buckinghamshire to the east, Berkshire to the south, Wiltshire to the south-west and Gloucestershire to the west. The county has major education and tourist industries and is noted for the concentration of performance motorsport companies and facilities. Oxford University Press is the largest firm among a concentration of print and publishing firms; the University of Oxford is also linked to the concentration of local biotechnology companies. As well as the city of Oxford, other centres of population are Banbury, Bicester, Kidlington and Chipping Norton to the north of Oxford; Carterton and Witney to the west; Thame and Chinnor to the east; and Abingdon-on-Thames, Wantage, Didcot, Wallingford and Henley-on-Thames to the south. The areas south of the Thames, the Vale of White Horse and parts of South Oxfordshire, are in the historic county of Berkshire, as is the highest point, the 261 metres (856 ft) White Horse Hill.Oxfordshire's county flower is the snake's-head fritillary.
1
Routes
269.86
Kilometers
6.04
Hours
Show region map
Oxfordshire Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Oxfordshire", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Oxfordshire (abbreviated Oxon, from Oxonium, the Latin name for Oxford) is a county in South East England. The ceremonial county borders Warwickshire to the north-west, Northamptonshire to the north-east, Buckinghamshire to the east, Berkshire to the south, Wiltshire to the south-west and Gloucestershire to the west. The county has major education and tourist industries and is noted for the concentration of performance motorsport companies and facilities. Oxford University Press is the largest firm among a concentration of print and publishing firms; the University of Oxford is also linked to the concentration of local biotechnology companies. As well as the city of Oxford, other centres of population are Banbury, Bicester, Kidlington and Chipping Norton to the north of Oxford; Carterton and Witney to the west; Thame and Chinnor to the east; and Abingdon-on-Thames, Wantage, Didcot, Wallingford and Henley-on-Thames to the south. The areas south of the Thames, the Vale of White Horse and parts of South Oxfordshire, are in the historic county of Berkshire, as is the highest point, the 261 metres (856 ft) White Horse Hill.Oxfordshire's county flower is the snake's-head fritillary.
2
Routes
498.31
Kilometers
9.2
Hours
Show region map
Midlothian Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Midlothian", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Midlothian (; Scots: Midlowden; Scottish Gaelic: Meadhan Lodainn) is one of the 32 council areas of Scotland, UK. It borders Edinburgh, East Lothian and the Scottish Borders council areas. Midlothian was also the name of a historic county formed in the Middle Ages. The county included Edinburgh and was formerly known as Edinburghshire, or more formally as the County of Edinburgh, until 1890. The historic county remains a lieutenancy area and a registration county for which purposes Edinburgh is included. Midlothian Council area was created in 1996, under the Local Government etc. (Scotland) Act 1994, with the boundaries of the Midlothian district of the Lothian region. The district had been created in 1975, under the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973, and it consisted of the local government county of Midlothian, minus the burgh of Musselburgh – with the areas of Inveresk, Wallyford and Whitecraig being lost to East Lothian, the Calders (East Calder, Midcalder and West Calder) and the Midlothian part of Livingston to West Lothian, Heriot and Stow parishes to the Ettrick and Lauderdale district of Borders Region, and Currie, Balerno, Ratho and Newbridge to Edinburgh.
1
Routes
155.79
Kilometers
3.86
Hours
Show region map
Cornwall Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Cornwall", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Cornwall (; Cornish: Kernow [ˈkɛrnɔʊ]) is a county in South West England in the United Kingdom. The county is bordered to the north and west by the Celtic Sea, to the south by the English Channel, and to the east by the county of Devon, over the River Tamar which forms most of the border between them. Cornwall forms the westernmost part of the South West Peninsula of the island of Great Britain. The furthest southwestern point of the island is Land's End; the southernmost point is Lizard Point. Cornwall has a population of 563,600 and covers an area of 3,563 km2 (1,376 sq mi). The county has been administered since 2009 by the unitary authority, Cornwall Council. The ceremonial county of Cornwall also includes the Isles of Scilly, which are administered separately. The administrative centre of Cornwall, and its only city, is Truro. Cornwall is the homeland of the Cornish people and the cultural and ethnic origin of the Cornish diaspora. It retains a distinct cultural identity that reflects its unique history, and is recognised as one of the Celtic nations with a rich cultural heritage. It was formerly a Brythonic kingdom and subsequently a royal duchy. The Cornish nationalist movement contests the present constitutional status of Cornwall and seeks greater autonomy within the United Kingdom in the form of a devolved legislative Cornish Assembly with powers similar to those in Wales and Scotland. In 2014, Cornish people were granted minority status under the European Framework Convention for the Protection of National Minorities, giving them recognition as a distinct ethnic group.First inhabited in the Palaeolithic and Mesolithic periods, Cornwall continued to be occupied by Neolithic and then Bronze Age peoples, and later (in the Iron Age) by Brythons with strong trade and cultural links to Wales and Brittany. Mining in Cornwall and Devon in the south west of England began in the early Bronze Age. Few Roman remains have been found in Cornwall, and there is little evidence that the Romans settled or had much military presence there. After the collapse of the Roman Empire, Cornwall was ruled by chieftains of the Cornovii who may have included figures regarded as semi-historical or legendary, such as King Mark of Cornwall and King Arthur, evidenced by folklore traditions derived from the Historia Regum Britanniae. The Cornovii division of the Dumnonii tribe were separated from the Brythons of Wales after the Battle of Deorham and often came into conflict with the expanding kingdom of Wessex. King Athelstan in AD 936 set the boundary between English and Cornish at the high water mark of the eastern bank of the River Tamar. From the early Middle Ages, language and culture were shared by Brythons trading across both sides of the Channel, resulting in the corresponding high medieval Breton kingdoms of Domnonée and Cornouaille and the Celtic Christianity common to both areas. Historically tin mining was important in the Cornish economy; it was increasingly significant during the High Middle Ages, and expanded greatly during the 19th century, when rich copper mines were also in production. In the mid-19th century, however, the tin and copper mines entered a period of decline. Subsequently, china clay extraction became more important, and metal mining had virtually ended by the 1990s. Traditionally, fishing (particularly of pilchards) and agriculture (notably dairy products and vegetables) were the other important sectors of the economy. Railways led to a growth of tourism in the 20th century; however, Cornwall's economy struggled after the decline of the mining and fishing industries.Cornwall is noted for its geology and coastal scenery. A large part of the Cornubian batholith is within Cornwall. The north coast has many cliffs where exposed geological formations are studied. The area is noted for its wild moorland landscapes, its long and varied coastline, its attractive villages, its many place-names derived from the Cornish language, and its very mild climate. Extensive stretches of Cornwall's coastline, and Bodmin Moor, are protected as an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.
1
Routes
261.41
Kilometers
5.12
Hours
Show region map
brecon beacons Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "brecon beacons", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The Brecon Beacons (Welsh: Bannau Brycheiniog, IPA: [ˈbanai̯ brəˈχəi̯njɔɡ]) is a mountain range in South Wales. In a narrow sense, the name refers to the range of Old Red Sandstone peaks which lie to the south of Brecon. Sometimes referred to as "the central Beacons" they include South Wales' highest mountain, Pen y Fan. The range forms the central section of the Brecon Beacons National Park (Parc Cenedlaethol Bannau Brycheiniog), a designation which also encompasses ranges both to the east and the west of "the central Beacons". This much wider area is also commonly referred to as "the Brecon Beacons", and it includes the Black Mountains to the east as well as the similarly named but quite distinct Black Mountain to the west. The highest peaks include Fan Brycheiniog to the west and Pen y Fan in the central part. They share the same basic geology as the central range, and so exhibit many similar features, such as the north-facing escarpment and glacial features such as lakes and cwms (cirques) below the escarpment. They all fall within the border of the national park.
3
Routes
936.59
Kilometers
17.35
Hours
Show region map
Argyll and Bute Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Argyll and Bute", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Argyll and Bute (Scottish Gaelic: Earra-Ghàidheal agus Bòd, pronounced [ɛrˠəˈɣɛːəlˠ̪ akəs̪ ˈpɔːtʲ]) is both one of 32 unitary authority council areas and a lieutenancy area in Scotland. The administrative centre for the council area is in Lochgilphead. Argyll and Bute covers the second largest administrative area of any Scottish council. The council area adjoins those of Highland, Perth and Kinross, Stirling and West Dunbartonshire. Its border runs through Loch Lomond. The present council area was created in 1996, when it was carved out of the Strathclyde region, which was a two-tier local government region of 19 districts, created in 1975. Argyll and Bute merged the existing Argyll and Bute district and one ward of the Dumbarton district. The Dumbarton ward, called 'Helensburgh and Lomond', included the burgh of Helensburgh and consisted of an area to the west of Loch Lomond, north of the Firth of Clyde and mostly east of Loch Long. The council area can also be described by reference to divisions of the counties which were abolished in 1975. The council area includes most of the county of Argyll (Argyll minus the Morvern area, north of Mull, which became part of the Highland region in 1975), part of the county of Bute (the Isle of Bute) and part of the county of Dunbartonshire (the Helensburgh and Lomond ward).
Cornwall coast road from Bude to St Ives
07-12-2018
View route
Expert rating:
Countries in this route:
UK Scotland 06 Garve to Ft William 345km svd
21-04-2017
View route
Expert rating:
Countries in this route:
UK Scotland 01 Newcastle to Nine Mile Burn 260km svd
21-04-2017
View route
Expert rating:
Countries in this route:
UK Scotland 03 Blairgowrie to LochNess 280km svd
21-04-2017
View route
Expert rating:
Countries in this route:
UK Scotland 02 Nine Mile Burn to Blairgowrie 250km svd
21-04-2017
View route
Expert rating:
Countries in this route:
The Brecon Beacons
06-12-2018
View route
Expert rating:
Countries in this route:
UK Scotland 07 Fort William Roundtrip 306km svd
21-04-2017
View route
Expert rating:
Countries in this route:
UK Scotland 04 Loch Ness to Thurso 280km svd
21-04-2017
View route
Expert rating:
Countries in this route:
UK Scotland 05 Thurso to Garve 263km svd
21-04-2017
View route
Expert rating:
Countries in this route:
UK Scotland 05a Thurso Garve 300+km Alternative svd
21-11-2018
View route
Expert rating:
Countries in this route: