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The prettiest verified routes in United Kingdom

 
MyRoute-app helps you with planning your dream journey! All routes on the page have been verified by our RouteXperts. De routes are categorized in regions, when you click on 'view region' you will see all verified routes for that region that are free to use.
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46
Amount of active RouteXperts (worldwide)
722
Amount of routes reviewed by RouteXperts (worldwide)
15128
Amount of downloaded routes (worldwide)
41254
Amount of visits (United Kingdom)
61
Amount of routes verified by RouteXperts (United Kingdom)
750
Amount of downloaded routes (United Kingdom)
Route collections
The route collections by MyRoute-app are collections of multiple routes that belong to each other and checked by MRA RouteXperts. All routes are identical for TomTom, Garmin and MyRoute-app Navigation.
12
Routes
6842.79
Kilometers
129.38
Hours
View route collection Complete tour of Ireland
About this route collection
Ireland is a beautiful country to drive. This collection contains 10 connecting routes that take you past the most beautiful, cities, villages, sights and wonders of nature.

All routes include reviews, route points for hotels, restaurants and POI.
The Irish population is very friendly and hospitable, in every village there are several pubs and restaurants where you can enjoy Irish cuisine.

There are several (historical) sights included in the routes, here is a summary overview per route, in the reviews of the routes you will find more details.

IRL1; Belvedere House & Garden Parks, Charleville Castle and the Ruins of Clonmacnoise
IRL2; Sky Road, Connemara Natural Park and Kylemoore Abbey.
IRL3; The Burren, the peninsulas Lettermore, Tiermee and Teach Mor, Blackhead and the Cliffs of Moher.
IRL4; Bunratty Castle, Folk Park and King Johns Castle.
IRL5; Ring of Kerry and Skellig Ring, this is without a doubt the most beautiful part of the Ring of Kerry. With a beautiful view of Little Skellig and Skellig Michael, the islands where the latest Star Wars film was shot.
IRL6; Ring of Beare, Glenngariff Woods Nature Reserve and one of the most beautiful panoramas in Ireland: "Ladies View".
IRL7; Killarney National Park with Molls Gap, Ladies View, the Healy Pass and Priest's Leap (very narrow winding route with partly very bad road surface) and Mizen Head.
IRL8; Blarney Castle, Cahir Castle, Killkenny Castle and Saint Canice's Cathedral.
IRL9; Dunmore Caves, SS Dunbrody Irish Emigrants ship, the ruins of Dunbrody Abbey and Garden and Kilkenny Castle.
IRL10; the ruins of the Black Castle, The Altamont Gardens, Powerscourt Gardens and Waterfall and St. Patricks Cathedral.

The routes are mainly country roads, often with beautiful curves, but sometimes very narrow or of poor quality. Driving experience is required, partly because of driving on the left side of the road.

You drive through nature parks and pass such as the Healy Pass, Conner Pass, Priest's Leap and Molls Gap. Two beautiful routes are the famous Ring of Kerry (IRL5) and Ring of Beare (IRL6). These are long journeys with many beautiful things along the way, so staying overnight while on the road is highly recommended. It can also be very busy on these routes in the weekends.

The other two routes in this collection is The Wild Atlantic Way from North-South and from South to North. This route is a sensational journey past towering cliffs and lively villages and towns, past hidden beaches and beautiful bays. This route follows the West Coast and you do multiple places from the other routes. The review of the route contains more details and for even more information I refer to https://www.wildatlanticway.com/home

All routes in this collection are all beautiful and challenging and can be driven by car or motorcycle.
Have fun with these routes.
1
Routes
235.02
Kilometers
5.01
Hours
Show region map
Groot Londen Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Groot Londen", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
"We gaan naar Londen" (English: We're going to London) is a Levenslied song by Willy Alberti sung with the Supporters of the Dutch association football club AFC Ajax from Amsterdam which was released on CNR Music in 1971. The song is the A-side to the record "We gaan naar Londen / Een, twee, drie, vier" which was released as a 7"-single. The song was released prospectively regarding the 1971 European Cup Final which was contested at Wembley Stadium in London. Ajax defeated Panathinaikos F.C. from Athens, Greece 2–0 in the final, winning their first of three consecutive European championships.Willy Alberti also released other records relating to his favorite football club Ajax throughout his career, having released the single "Ajax olé olé olé (je bent mijn glorie)" two years prior.
6
Routes
1796.87
Kilometers
32.55
Hours
Show region map
Yorkshire and the Humber Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Yorkshire and the Humber", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Yorkshire and the Humber is one of nine official regions of England at the first level of Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics (NUTS) for statistical purposes. It comprises most of Yorkshire (the administrative areas of South Yorkshire, West Yorkshire, East Riding of Yorkshire, Hull, North Yorkshire and the City of York), as well as North Lincolnshire and North East Lincolnshire. It does not include Middlesbrough, Redcar and Cleveland or other areas of the historic county of Yorkshire, such as Sedbergh not included in the aforementioned administrative areas. The largest settlements are, Leeds, Sheffield, Bradford, Hull, and York. The population in 2011 was 5,284,000.The committees for the regions, including the one for Yorkshire and the Humber, ceased to exist upon the dissolution of Parliament on 12 April 2010; they were not re-established by the newly elected House. Regional ministers were not reappointed by the incoming Coalition Government, and the Government Offices were abolished in 2011.
11
Routes
2431.22
Kilometers
51.39
Hours
Show region map
South East Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "South East", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The points of the compass mark the divisions on a compass, which is primarily divided into the four cardinal directions: north, south, east, and west. These points are further subdivided by the addition of the four intercardinal (or ordinal) directions—northeast (NE), southeast (SE), southwest (SW), and northwest (NW)—to indicate the eight principal "winds". In meteorological usage, further intermediate points between the cardinal and intercardinal directions, such as north-northeast (NNE) are added to give the sixteen points of a compass rose. At the most complete division are the full thirty-two points of the mariner's compass, which adds points such as north by east (NbE; sometimes NxE) between north and north-northeast, and northeast by north (NEbN; NExN) between north-northeast and northeast. A compass point allows reference to a specific course (or azimuth) in a colloquial fashion, without having to compute or remember degrees. The European nautical tradition retained the term "one point" to describe ​1⁄32 of a circle in such phrases as "two points to starboard". By the middle of the 18th century, the 32-point system was extended with half- and quarter-points to allow 128 directions to be differentiated.
5
Routes
1229.1
Kilometers
24.16
Hours
Show region map
West Midlands Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "West Midlands", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The West Midlands is a metropolitan county and combined authority area in western-central England with a 2014 estimated population of 2,808,356, making it the second most populous county in England after Greater London. It came into existence as a metropolitan county in 1974 after the passage of the Local Government Act 1972, formed from parts of Staffordshire, Worcestershire and Warwickshire. The county itself is a NUTS 2 region within the wider NUTS 1 region of the same name. The county consists of seven metropolitan boroughs: the City of Birmingham, the City of Coventry and the City of Wolverhampton, as well as the boroughs of Dudley, Sandwell, Solihull and Walsall. The metropolitan county exists in law and as a geographic frame of reference, and as a ceremonial county it has a Lord Lieutenant and a High Sheriff. Between 1974 and 1986, the West Midlands County Council was the administrative body covering the county; this was abolished on 31 March 1986, and the constituent metropolitan boroughs effectively became unitary authorities. A new administrative body for the county (and some of the district surrounding it as Non-Constituent members), the West Midlands Combined Authority, was created in June 2016. Since May 2017, the authority has been headed by a directly elected Mayor of the West Midlands, a position currently held by Andy Street of the Conservative Party. Other county-wide bodies include the West Midlands Police, the West Midlands Fire Service and Transport for West Midlands. The county is sometimes described as the "West Midlands metropolitan area" or the "West Midlands conurbation", although these have different, and less clearly defined, boundaries. The main conurbation, or urban area, does not include Coventry for example. The name "West Midlands" is also used for the much larger West Midlands region, which sometimes causes confusion, not surprising perhaps when geographically it is on the eastern side of the region, the western side comprising Shropshire and Herefordshire.
3
Routes
851.69
Kilometers
15.4
Hours
Show region map
East of England Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "East of England", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The East of England is one of nine official regions of England at the first level of NUTS for statistical purposes. It was created in 1994 and was adopted for statistics from 1999. It includes the ceremonial counties of Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire, Essex, Hertfordshire, Norfolk and Suffolk. Essex has the highest population in the region. Its population at the 2011 census was 5,847,000.Bedford, Luton, Basildon, Peterborough, Southend-on-Sea, Norwich, Ipswich, Colchester, Chelmsford and Cambridge are the region's most populous towns. The southern part of the region lies in the London commuter belt.
7
Routes
1964.54
Kilometers
32.76
Hours
Show region map
North East Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "North East", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The points of the compass mark the divisions on a compass, which is primarily divided into the four cardinal directions: north, south, east, and west. These points are further subdivided by the addition of the four intercardinal (or ordinal) directions—northeast (NE), southeast (SE), southwest (SW), and northwest (NW)—to indicate the eight principal "winds". In meteorological usage, further intermediate points between the cardinal and intercardinal directions, such as north-northeast (NNE) are added to give the sixteen points of a compass rose. At the most complete division are the full thirty-two points of the mariner's compass, which adds points such as north by east (NbE; sometimes NxE) between north and north-northeast, and northeast by north (NEbN; NExN) between north-northeast and northeast. A compass point allows reference to a specific course (or azimuth) in a colloquial fashion, without having to compute or remember degrees. The European nautical tradition retained the term "one point" to describe ​1⁄32 of a circle in such phrases as "two points to starboard". By the middle of the 18th century, the 32-point system was extended with half- and quarter-points to allow 128 directions to be differentiated.
17
Routes
3319.78
Kilometers
71.96
Hours
Show region map
South West Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "South West", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The points of the compass mark the divisions on a compass, which is primarily divided into the four cardinal directions: north, south, east, and west. These points are further subdivided by the addition of the four intercardinal (or ordinal) directions—northeast (NE), southeast (SE), southwest (SW), and northwest (NW)—to indicate the eight principal "winds". In meteorological usage, further intermediate points between the cardinal and intercardinal directions, such as north-northeast (NNE) are added to give the sixteen points of a compass rose. At the most complete division are the full thirty-two points of the mariner's compass, which adds points such as north by east (NbE; sometimes NxE) between north and north-northeast, and northeast by north (NEbN; NExN) between north-northeast and northeast. A compass point allows reference to a specific course (or azimuth) in a colloquial fashion, without having to compute or remember degrees. The European nautical tradition retained the term "one point" to describe ​1⁄32 of a circle in such phrases as "two points to starboard". By the middle of the 18th century, the 32-point system was extended with half- and quarter-points to allow 128 directions to be differentiated.
7
Routes
1597.42
Kilometers
30.44
Hours
Show region map
North West Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "North West", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The points of the compass mark the divisions on a compass, which is primarily divided into the four cardinal directions: north, south, east, and west. These points are further subdivided by the addition of the four intercardinal (or ordinal) directions—northeast (NE), southeast (SE), southwest (SW), and northwest (NW)—to indicate the eight principal "winds". In meteorological usage, further intermediate points between the cardinal and intercardinal directions, such as north-northeast (NNE) are added to give the sixteen points of a compass rose. At the most complete division are the full thirty-two points of the mariner's compass, which adds points such as north by east (NbE; sometimes NxE) between north and north-northeast, and northeast by north (NEbN; NExN) between north-northeast and northeast. A compass point allows reference to a specific course (or azimuth) in a colloquial fashion, without having to compute or remember degrees. The European nautical tradition retained the term "one point" to describe ​1⁄32 of a circle in such phrases as "two points to starboard". By the middle of the 18th century, the 32-point system was extended with half- and quarter-points to allow 128 directions to be differentiated.
21
Routes
6246.03
Kilometers
103.44
Hours
Show region map
Schotland Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Schotland", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Ada of Scotland (c. 1139 – after 1206), also known as Ada of Huntingdon, was a member of the Scottish royal house who became Countess of Holland by marriage to Floris III, Count of Holland.
6
Routes
1503.64
Kilometers
28.41
Hours
Show region map
Wales Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Wales", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Wales (Welsh: Cymru [ˈkəmri] (listen)) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It is bordered by England to the east, the Irish Sea to the north and west, and the Bristol Channel to the south. It had a population in 2011 of 3,063,456 and has a total area of 20,779 km2 (8,023 sq mi). Wales has over 1,680 miles (2,700 km) of coastline and is largely mountainous with its higher peaks in the north and central areas, including Snowdon (Yr Wyddfa), its highest summit. The country lies within the north temperate zone and has a changeable, maritime climate. Welsh national identity emerged among the Britons after the Roman withdrawal from Britain in the 5th century, and Wales is regarded as one of the modern Celtic nations. Llywelyn ap Gruffudd's death in 1282 marked the completion of Edward I of England's conquest of Wales, though Owain Glyndŵr briefly restored independence to Wales in the early 15th century. The whole of Wales was annexed by England and incorporated within the English legal system under the Laws in Wales Acts 1535 and 1542. Distinctive Welsh politics developed in the 19th century. Welsh liberalism, exemplified in the early 20th century by Lloyd George, was displaced by the growth of socialism and the Labour Party. Welsh national feeling grew over the century; Plaid Cymru was formed in 1925 and the Welsh Language Society in 1962. Established under the Government of Wales Act 1998, the National Assembly for Wales holds responsibility for a range of devolved policy matters. At the dawn of the Industrial Revolution, development of the mining and metallurgical industries transformed the country from an agricultural society into an industrial nation; the South Wales Coalfield's exploitation caused a rapid expansion of Wales' population. Two-thirds of the population live in South Wales, including Cardiff, Swansea, Newport and the nearby valleys. Now that the country's traditional extractive and heavy industries have gone or are in decline, Wales' economy depends on the public sector, light and service industries and tourism. Although Wales closely shares its political and social history with the rest of Great Britain and, while a majority of the population in most areas speaks English as a first language, the country has retained a distinct cultural identity. Both Welsh and English are official languages; over 560,000 Welsh-speakers live in Wales, and the language is spoken by a majority of the population in parts of the north and west. From the late 19th century onwards, Wales acquired its popular image as the "land of song", in part due to the eisteddfod tradition. At many international sporting events, such as the FIFA World Cup, Rugby World Cup and the Commonwealth Games, Wales has its own national teams, though at the Olympic Games, Welsh athletes compete as part of a Great Britain team. Rugby union is seen as a symbol of Welsh identity and an expression of national consciousness.
3
Routes
833.26
Kilometers
15.17
Hours
Show region map
East Midlands Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "East Midlands", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The East Midlands is one of nine official regions of England at the first level of NUTS for statistical purposes. It consists of Derbyshire, Leicestershire, Lincolnshire (except North and North East Lincolnshire), Northamptonshire, Nottinghamshire and Rutland. The region has an area of 15,627 km2 (6,034 sq mi), with a population over 4.5 million in 2011. There are six main urban centres, Derby, Leicester, Lincoln, Mansfield, Northampton and Nottingham. Others include Boston, Chesterfield, Corby, Grantham, Hinckley, Kettering, Loughborough, Newark-on-Trent, Skegness, and Wellingborough. Relative proximity to London and its position on the national motorway and trunk road networks help the East Midlands to thrive as an economic hub. Nottingham and Leicester are each classified as a sufficiency-level world city by the Globalization and World Cities Research Network.The region is primarily served by East Midlands Airport, which lies between Derby, Loughborough and Nottingham.
4
Routes
4598.1
Kilometers
86.41
Hours
Show region map
Ulster Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Ulster", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Ulster (; Irish: Ulaidh [ˈʊlˠəi] or Cúige Uladh [ˌkuːɟə ˈʊlˠə]; Ulster Scots: Ulstèr or Ulster) is a province in the north of the island of Ireland. It is made up of nine counties: six of these constitute Northern Ireland (a part of the United Kingdom); the remaining three are in the Republic of Ireland. It is the second largest (after Munster) and second most populous (after Leinster) of Ireland's four provinces, with Belfast being its biggest city. Unlike the other provinces, Ulster has a high percentage of Protestants, making up almost half of its population. English is the main language and Ulster English the main dialect. A minority also speak Irish, and there are Gaeltacht (Irish-speaking regions) in southern Londonderry, the Gaeltacht Quarter of Belfast and in Donegal, where 25% of the total Gaeltacht population of Ireland is located. Lough Neagh, in the east, is the largest lake in the British Isles, while Lough Erne in the west is one of its largest lake networks. The main mountain ranges are the Mournes, Sperrins, Croaghgorms and Derryveagh Mountains. Historically, Ulster lay at the heart of the Gaelic world made up of Gaelic Ireland, Scotland and the Isle of Man. According to tradition, in ancient Ireland it was one of the fifths (Irish: cúige) ruled by a rí ruirech, or "king of over-kings". It is named after the overkingdom of Ulaid, in the east of the province, which was in turn named after the Ulaid folk. The other overkingdoms in Ulster were Airgíalla and Ailech. After the Norman invasion of Ireland in the 12th century, eastern Ulster was conquered by the Anglo-Normans and became the Earldom of Ulster. By the late 14th century the Earldom had collapsed and the O'Neill dynasty had come to dominate most of Ulster, claiming the title King of Ulster. Ulster became the most thoroughly Gaelic and independent of Ireland's provinces. Its rulers resisted English encroachment but were defeated in the Nine Years' War (1594–1603). King James I then colonized Ulster with English-speaking Protestant settlers from Great Britain, in the Plantation of Ulster. This led to the founding of many of Ulster's towns. The inflow of Protestant settlers and migrants also led to bouts of sectarian violence with Catholics, notably during the 1641 rebellion and the Armagh disturbances. Along with the rest of Ireland, Ulster became part of the United Kingdom in 1801. In the early 20th century, moves towards Irish self-rule were opposed by many Ulster Protestants, sparking the Home Rule Crisis. This, and the subsequent Irish War of Independence, led to the partition of Ireland. Six Ulster counties became Northern Ireland, a self-governing territory within the United Kingdom, while the rest of Ireland became the Irish Free State, now the Republic of Ireland. The term Ulster has no official function for local government purposes in either country. However, for the purposes of ISO 3166-2, Ulster is used to refer to the three counties of Cavan, Donegal and Monaghan only, which are given country sub-division code "IE-U". The name is also used by various organisations such as cultural and sporting bodies.
UK Scotland 01 Newcastle to Nine Mile Burn 260km svd copy
04-02-2019
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Hull to the Holy Island of Lindisfarne
05-02-2019
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Rondrit Kent vanuit East Grinstead
26-02-2019
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Rondrit Kent National Park South Downs
28-02-2019
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North Coast 500 Round trip from Inverness
02-03-2019
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Round trip from Poole including New Forest
14-03-2019
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Round trip from Newmarket to Wells next the Sea
09-03-2019
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Monday Mini Run Bideford Lynton Ilfracombe
22-08-2018
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Round trip from Gloucester through The Cotswolds
01-09-2018
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The Brecon Beacons from Gloucester to Builth Wells
06-12-2018
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