IRL Wild Atlantic Way NorthSouth
Wild Atlantic Way
The Wild Atlantic Way is a sensational journey along towering cliffs and lively villages and towns, along hidden beaches and beautiful bays.

Ireland has many villages and towns with cozy pubs and good restaurants, the inhabitants are very friendly. The route has many winding roads, beautiful hills and mountains, this route is worth 5 stars.

So whether you're doing the whole route or driving bits of it, exactly as you want, it will be an unforgettable experience. This route runs from North to South but can also be driven from South to North.
Along the way there are many small Irish villages and cities to stop for a lunch, dinner or overnight stay.
Combine the journey with well-known tours such as Ring of Kerry and Ring of Beare. Combine the route with passes such as the Healy Pass, Conner Pass and Molls Gap.

We used parts of this route for our Ireland trip in 2015. Routes are also on MyRouteXperts (they start with IRL and a number).


More info to plan your trip; www.activeme.ie
Cliffs of Moher
Valentina Light house
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Disclaimer:

Using this GPS route is for your own account and risk. The route has been compiled with care and checked by a MyRoute-app accredited RouteXpert for use on both TomTom, Garmin and MyRoute-app Navigation. Due to changed circumstances, road diversions or seasonal closures there may be changes, so we recommend checking every route before use. Preferably use the routetrack in your navigation system. For more information about the use of MyRoute-app, please visit the website at 'Community 'or' Webinars'.

Waypoint, used to construct the route
Sight, here you can see something
Viewpoint, a short stop for taking a picture
Stopping point, for hotel, lunch, etc
Attention, see the text in the waypoint for more information

Copyright 2019 MyRouteApp B.V. | All Rights Reserved |
René Plücken (RouteXpert)
Ulster
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Ulster", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Ulster (; Irish: Ulaidh [ˈʊlˠəi] or Cúige Uladh [ˌkuːɟə ˈʊlˠə]; Ulster Scots: Ulstèr or Ulster) is one of the four traditional Irish provinces, in the north of Ireland. It is made up of nine counties: six of these constitute Northern Ireland (a part of the United Kingdom); the remaining three are in the Republic of Ireland. It is the second-largest (after Munster) and second-most populous (after Leinster) of Ireland's four provinces, with Belfast being its biggest city. Unlike the other provinces, Ulster has a high percentage of Protestants, making up almost half of its population. English is the main language and Ulster English the main dialect. A minority also speak Irish, and there are Gaeltacht (Irish-speaking regions) in southern County Londonderry, the Gaeltacht Quarter of Belfast and in Donegal, where 25% of the total Gaeltacht population of Ireland is located. Lough Neagh, in the east, is the largest lake in the British Isles, while Lough Erne in the west is one of its largest lake networks. The main mountain ranges are the Mournes, Sperrins, Croaghgorms and Derryveagh Mountains. Historically, Ulster lay at the heart of the Gaelic world made up of Gaelic Ireland, Scotland and the Isle of Man. According to tradition, in ancient Ireland it was one of the fifths (Irish: cúige) ruled by a rí ruirech, or "king of over-kings". It is named after the overkingdom of Ulaid, in the east of the province, which was in turn named after the Ulaid folk. The other overkingdoms in Ulster were Airgíalla and Ailech. After the Norman invasion of Ireland in the 12th century, eastern Ulster was conquered by the Anglo-Normans and became the Earldom of Ulster. By the late 14th century the Earldom had collapsed and the O'Neill dynasty had come to dominate most of Ulster, claiming the title King of Ulster. Ulster became the most thoroughly Gaelic and independent of Ireland's provinces. Its rulers resisted English encroachment but were defeated in the Nine Years' War (1594–1603). King James I then colonised Ulster with English-speaking Protestant settlers from Great Britain, in the Plantation of Ulster. This led to the founding of many of Ulster's towns. The inflow of Protestant settlers and migrants also led to bouts of sectarian violence with Catholics, notably during the 1641 rebellion and the Armagh disturbances. Along with the rest of Ireland, Ulster became part of the United Kingdom in 1801. In the early 20th century, moves towards Irish self-rule were opposed by many Ulster Protestants, sparking the Home Rule Crisis. This, and the subsequent Irish War of Independence, led to the partition of Ireland. Six Ulster counties became Northern Ireland, a self-governing territory within the United Kingdom, while the rest of Ireland became the Irish Free State, now the Republic of Ireland. The term Ulster has no official function for local government purposes in either country. However, for the purposes of ISO 3166-2, Ulster is used to refer to the three counties of Cavan, Donegal and Monaghan only, which are given country sub-division code "IE-U". The name is also used by various organisations such as cultural and sporting bodies.
4740
Amount of visits (Ulster)
4
Amount of routes verified by RouteXperts (Ulster)
128
Amount of downloaded routes (Ulster)
Route collections
The route collections by MyRoute-app are collections of multiple routes that belong to each other and checked by MRA RouteXperts. All routes are identical for TomTom, Garmin and MyRoute-app Navigation.
12
Routes
6842.79
Kilometers
129.34
Hours
View route collection Complete tour of Ireland
About this route collection
Ireland is a beautiful country to drive. This collection contains 10 connecting routes that take you past the most beautiful, cities, villages, sights and wonders of nature.

All routes include reviews, route points for hotels, restaurants and POI.
The Irish population is very friendly and hospitable, in every village there are several pubs and restaurants where you can enjoy Irish cuisine.

There are several (historical) sights included in the routes, here is a summary overview per route, in the reviews of the routes you will find more details.

IRL1; Belvedere House & Garden Parks, Charleville Castle and the Ruins of Clonmacnoise
IRL2; Sky Road, Connemara Natural Park and Kylemoore Abbey.
IRL3; The Burren, the peninsulas Lettermore, Tiermee and Teach Mor, Blackhead and the Cliffs of Moher.
IRL4; Bunratty Castle, Folk Park and King Johns Castle.
IRL5; Ring of Kerry and Skellig Ring, this is without a doubt the most beautiful part of the Ring of Kerry. With a beautiful view of Little Skellig and Skellig Michael, the islands where the latest Star Wars film was shot.
IRL6; Ring of Beare, Glenngariff Woods Nature Reserve and one of the most beautiful panoramas in Ireland: "Ladies View".
IRL7; Killarney National Park with Molls Gap, Ladies View, the Healy Pass and Priest's Leap (very narrow winding route with partly very bad road surface) and Mizen Head.
IRL8; Blarney Castle, Cahir Castle, Killkenny Castle and Saint Canice's Cathedral.
IRL9; Dunmore Caves, SS Dunbrody Irish Emigrants ship, the ruins of Dunbrody Abbey and Garden and Kilkenny Castle.
IRL10; the ruins of the Black Castle, The Altamont Gardens, Powerscourt Gardens and Waterfall and St. Patricks Cathedral.

The routes are mainly country roads, often with beautiful curves, but sometimes very narrow or of poor quality. Driving experience is required, partly because of driving on the left side of the road.

You drive through nature parks and pass such as the Healy Pass, Conner Pass, Priest's Leap and Molls Gap. Two beautiful routes are the famous Ring of Kerry (IRL5) and Ring of Beare (IRL6). These are long journeys with many beautiful things along the way, so staying overnight while on the road is highly recommended. It can also be very busy on these routes in the weekends.

The other two routes in this collection is The Wild Atlantic Way from North-South and from South to North. This route is a sensational journey past towering cliffs and lively villages and towns, past hidden beaches and beautiful bays. This route follows the West Coast and you do multiple places from the other routes. The review of the route contains more details and for even more information I refer to https://www.wildatlanticway.com/home

All routes in this collection are all beautiful and challenging and can be driven by car or motorcycle.
Have fun with these routes.