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The prettiest verified routes in Italy

 
MyRoute-app helps you with planning your dream journey! All routes on the page have been verified by our RouteXperts. De routes are categorized in regions, when you click on 'view region' you will see all verified routes for that region that are free to use.
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37
Amount of active RouteXperts (worldwide)
671
Amount of routes reviewed by RouteXperts (worldwide)
12667
Amount of downloaded routes (worldwide)
21466
Amount of visits (Italy)
61
Amount of routes verified by RouteXperts (Italy)
862
Amount of downloaded routes (Italy)
Route collections
The route collections by MyRoute-app are collections of multiple routes that belong to each other and checked by MRA RouteXperts. All routes are identical for TomTom, Garmin and MyRoute-app Navigation.
8
Routes
1539.69
Kilometers
35.54
Hours
View route collection The 8 most beautiful routes of the Dolomites
About this route collection
The Dolomites is a mountain range in Italy that is part of the Southern Limestone Alps. Typical for the Dolomites are the steep rock walls and peaks, which were created by erosion and weathering. The mountain range is split into two parts: the eastern and the western. The highest peak of the Dolomites, the Marmolada, is 3343 meters high.

Enjoy the beautiful routes in the Marmolada area. Whichever way you head in the Dolomites, it is always incredibly beautiful. You get one (toll free) pass after the other for your wheels and it is pure enjoyment every time. A delightful playground that, depending on the hour, depending on the direction, depending on the weather, always looks different and enchants you completely!

The routes have been checked and made equal for Garmin, TomTom and MyRoute-app Navigation users. Do you have a fantastic route in the Dolomites that belongs to this list? Then send us the route via routexpert@myrouteapp.com.

Enjoy!
12
Routes
3347.23
Kilometers
68.76
Hours
View route collection The 12 most beautiful car and motorcycle routes in Carinthia
About this route collection
“Motorradland Kärnten” where you feel so wonderfully welcome as a motorcyclist!
Own website for motorcyclists, own compound routes, hotels, campsites and guest houses with attention for motorcyclists, a wonderful area where motorcyclists are very popular.

Kärnten or Carinthia, at the crossroads of the Germanic, Slavic and Roman worlds. Three cultures within a few kilometers, southern flair, culinary delights, cross-border tours. Breakfast in Italy, lunch in Slovenia, dinner in Austria - all in one day. Experience the diversity in the borderless Alps-Adriatic region, the area for motorcyclists.

Extensive day trips on winding mountain paths, romantic panoramic routes and beautiful lakes, here the 12 TOP routes Kärnten / Carinthia. Enjoy!
6
Routes
1574.49
Kilometers
35.07
Hours
Show region map
Goriska Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Goriska", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Goriška is a historical region in western Slovenia on the border with Italy. It comprises the northern part of the wider traditional region of the Slovenian Littoral (Primorska). The name Goriška is an adjective referring to the city of Gorizia, its historical and cultural centre.
10
Routes
3161.31
Kilometers
65.23
Hours
Show region map
Lombardije Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Lombardije", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The Giro di Lombardia (English: Tour of Lombardy), officially Il Lombardia, is a cycling race in Lombardy, Italy. It is traditionally the last of the five 'Monuments' of the season, considered to be one of the most prestigious one-day events in cycling, and one of the last events on the UCI World Tour calendar. Nicknamed the Classica delle foglie morte ("the Classic of the falling (dead) leaves"), it is the most important Autumn Classic in cycling. The race's most famous climb is the Madonna del Ghisallo in the race finale. The first edition was held in 1905. Since its creation, the Giro di Lombardia has been the classic with the fewest interruptions in cycling; only the editions of 1943 and 1944 were cancelled for reasons of war. Italian Fausto Coppi won a record five times. Because of its demanding course, the race is considered a climbers classic, favouring climbers with a strong sprint finish.
11
Routes
3007.19
Kilometers
64.82
Hours
Show region map
Karinthie Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Karinthie", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Otto III (c. 1265 – 25 May 1310), a member of the House of Gorizia (Meinhardiner dynasty), was Duke of Carinthia and Count of Tyrol from 1295 until his death. He ruled jointly with his younger brothers Louis and Henry VI.
12
Routes
2031.38
Kilometers
55.34
Hours
Show region map
Toscane Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Toscane", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Cassa di Risparmio di Pistoia e della Lucchesia (literally The Savings bank of Pistoia and Lucchesia; known as Caripistoia, Caript or just CRPT in short) is an Italian regional bank based in Pistoia, Tuscany. The bank was a subsidiary of Banca CR Firenze, with Intesa Sanpaolo as the ultimate holding company.
1
Routes
220.55
Kilometers
4.94
Hours
Show region map
Umbri Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Umbri", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The Umbri were Italic people of ancient Italy. A region called Umbria still exists and is now occupied by Italian speakers. It is somewhat smaller than the ancient Umbria. Most ancient Umbrian cities were settled in the 9th-4th centuries BC on easily defensible hilltops. Umbria was bordered by the Tiber and Nar rivers and included the Apennine slopes on the Adriatic. The ancient Umbrian language is a branch of a group called Oscan-Umbrian, which is related to the Latino-Faliscan languages.
3
Routes
1069.73
Kilometers
23.75
Hours
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Piemont Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Piemont", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Piedmont ( PEED-mont; Italian: Piemonte, pronounced [pjeˈmonte]; Piedmontese, Occitan and Arpitan: Piemont, Piedmontese pronunciation: [pjeˈmʊŋt]) is a region in northwest Italy, one of the 20 regions of the country. It borders the Liguria region to the south, the Lombardy and Emilia-Romagna regions to the east and the Aosta Valley region to the northwest; it also borders Switzerland to the northeast and France to the west. It has an area of 25,402 square kilometres (9,808 sq mi) and a population of 4,377,941 as of 30 November 2017. The capital of Piedmont is Turin.
11
Routes
2848.19
Kilometers
62.8
Hours
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Friuli Venezia Giulia Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Friuli Venezia Giulia", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Friuli Venezia Giulia (pronounced [friˈuːli veˈnɛttsja ˈdʒuːlja]) is one of the 20 regions of Italy, and one of five autonomous regions with special statute. The regional capital is Trieste. The name used to be hyphenated as Friuli-Venezia Giulia until 2001. The region is called Friûl Vignesie Julie in Friulian and Furlanija Julijska krajina in Slovene, two languages spoken in the region. The city of Venice ("Venezia") is not in this region, despite the name. Friuli Venezia Giulia has an area of 7,924 km2 and about 1.2 million inhabitants. A natural opening to the sea for many Central European countries, the region is traversed by the major transport routes between the east and west of southern Europe. It encompasses the historical-geographical region of Friuli and a small portion of the historical region of Venezia Giulia – also known in English as the Julian March – each with its own distinct history, traditions and identity.
1
Routes
220.55
Kilometers
4.94
Hours
Show region map
Marche Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Marche", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Marche ( MAR-kay, Italian: [ˈmarke] (listen)) or the Marches ( MAR-chiz) is one of the twenty regions of Italy. The name of the region derives from the plural name of marca, originally referring to the medieval March of Ancona and nearby marches of Camerino and Fermo. Marche is well known for its shoemaking tradition, with the finest and most luxurious Italian footwear being manufactured in this region.The region is located in the Central area of the country, bordered by Emilia-Romagna and the republic of San Marino to the north, Tuscany to the west, Umbria to the southwest, Abruzzo and Lazio to the south and the Adriatic Sea to the east. Except for river valleys and the often very narrow coastal strip, the land is hilly. A railway from Bologna to Brindisi, built in the 19th century, runs along the coast of the entire territory. Inland, the mountainous nature of the region, even today, allows relatively little travel north and south, except by twisting roads over the passes. The Umbrian enclave of Monte Ruperto (a subdivision of the Comune of Città di Castello) is entirely surrounded by the Province of Pesaro and Urbino, which constitutes the northern part of the region. Urbino, one of the major cities of the region, was the birthplace of Raphael, as well as a major center of Renaissance history.
2
Routes
419.39
Kilometers
8.57
Hours
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Sardinie Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Sardinie", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The following is a list of rulers of Sardinia, in particular, of the monarchs of the Kingdom of Sardinia and Corsica from 1323 and then of the Kingdom of Sardinia from 1479 to 1861.
1
Routes
288.73
Kilometers
5.56
Hours
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Auvergne Rhone Alpes Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Auvergne Rhone Alpes", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes or ARA (French pronunciation: [ovɛʁɲ ʁon alp] (listen), Arpitan: Ôvèrgne-Rôno-Ârpes, Occitan: Auvèrnhe Ròse Aups, Italian: Alvernia-Rodano-Alpi) is a region in southeast-central France created by the territorial reform of French Regions in 2015; it resulted from the merger of Auvergne and Rhône-Alpes. The new region came into effect on 1 January 2016, after the regional elections in December 2015.The region covers an area of more than 69,711 km2 (26,916 sq mi), making it the third largest in metropolitan France, with a population of 7,877,698, second only to Île-de-France. It consists of 12 departments and one territorial collectivity. Lyon is the chef-lieu of the region. This new region combines diverse geographical, sociological, economic, and cultural regions, which was already true of Rhône-Alpes, as well as Auvergne, to a lesser extent. While the old Rhône-Alpes and Auvergne regions each enjoyed a unity defined by axes of communication and the pull of their repective metropoles, the new combination is heterogeneous, and sustained lively opposition from some local officials after its creation..
1
Routes
215.96
Kilometers
6.43
Hours
Show region map
Emilia Romagna Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Emilia Romagna", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Emilia-Romagna (UK: , US: , both also ; Italian: [eˈmiːlja roˈmaɲɲa]; Emilian and Romagnol: Emélia-Rumâgna) is an administrative region of Northeast Italy comprising the historical regions of Emilia and Romagna. Its capital is Bologna. It has an area of 22,446 km2 (8,666 sq mi), and about 4.4 million inhabitants. Emilia-Romagna is one of the wealthiest and most developed regions in Europe, with the third highest GDP per capita in Italy. Bologna, its capital, has one of Italy's highest quality of life indices and advanced social services. Emilia-Romagna is also a cultural and tourist centre, being the home of the University of Bologna, the oldest university in the world, containing Romanesque and Renaissance cities (such as Modena, Parma and Ferrara), a former Eastern Roman Empire capital such as Ravenna, encompassing eleven UNESCO heritage sites, being a centre for food and automobile production (home of automotive companies such as Ferrari, Lamborghini, Maserati, Pagani, De Tomaso and Ducati) and having popular coastal resorts such as Cervia, Cesenatico, Rimini and Riccione. In 2018, the Lonely Planet guide named Emilia Romagna as the best place to see in Europe.
2
Routes
437.22
Kilometers
10.08
Hours
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Provence Alpes Cote d Azur Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Provence Alpes Cote d Azur", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur (French pronunciation: ​[pʁɔvɑ̃s alp kot dazyʁ]; Occitan: Provença-Aups-Còsta d'Azur; Italian: Provenza-Alpi-Costa Azzurra; Région Sud) is one of the 18 administrative regions of France, the far southeastern on the mainland. Its capital is Marseille. The region is roughly coterminous with the former French province of Provence, with the addition of the following adjacent areas: the former papal territory of Avignon, known as Comtat Venaissin; the former Sardinian-Piedmontese county of Nice, whose coastline is known in English as the French Riviera, and in French as the Côte d'Azur; and the southeastern part of the former French province of Dauphiné, in the French Alps. Previously known by the acronym PACA, the region adopted the name Région Sud as a commercial name or nickname in December 2017. 4,935,576 people live in the region according to the 2012 census. It encompasses six departments in Southeastern France: Alpes-de-Haute-Provence, Alpes-Maritimes, Bouches-du-Rhône, Hautes-Alpes, Var and Vaucluse. It is bounded to the east by the France-Italy border, to the south by the Mediterranean Sea and by the Principality of Monaco, to the north by Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes, and to the west by Occitanie, with the Rhône river marking its westernmost border. The region logotype displays the coat of arms created in the 1990s and which combines the coats of arms of the old provinces making up Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur. Economically the region is the third most important in France, just behind Île-de-France and Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes. Its GDP in 2012 was €142.4 billion (US$183.1 billion) while its per capita GDP was €28,861 ($US 37,121).
17
Routes
4025.73
Kilometers
92.27
Hours
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Veneto Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Veneto", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Veneto (US: , Italian: [ˈvɛːneto]; Venetian: Vèneto [ˈvɛneto]) or Venetia is one of the 20 regions of Italy. Its population is about five million, ranking fifth in Italy. The region's capital is Venice. Veneto was part of the Roman Empire until the 5th century AD. Later, after a feudal period, it was part of the Republic of Venice until 1797. Venice ruled for centuries over one of the largest and richest maritime republics and trade empires in the world. After the Napoleonic Wars and the Congress of Vienna, the Republic was annexed by the Austrian Empire, until it was merged with the Kingdom of Italy in 1866, as a result of the Third Italian War of Independence. Besides Italian, most inhabitants also speak Venetian which is divided into five varieties. Since 1971 the Statute of Veneto has referred to the region's citizens as "the Venetian people". Article 1 defines Veneto as an "autonomous Region", "constituted by the Venetian people and the lands of the provinces of Belluno, Padua, Rovigo, Treviso, Venice, Verona and Vicenza", while maintaining "bonds with Venetians in the world". Article 2 sets forth the principle of the "self-government of the Venetian people" and mandates the Region to "promote the historical identity of the Venetian people and civilisation". Despite these affirmations, approved by the Italian Parliament, Veneto is not among the autonomous regions with special statute, differently from its north-eastern and north-western neighbours, Friuli-Venezia Giulia and Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol respectively. Veneto is home to a notable nationalist movement, known as Venetian nationalism or Venetism. The region's largest party is the Liga Veneta, a founding component of the Lega Nord. The current President of Veneto is Luca Zaia (Liga Veneta–Lega Nord), re-elected in 2015 with 50.1% of the vote. Zaia II Government includes also Forza Italia and is externally supported by Independence We Veneto and the Brothers of Italy. An autonomy referendum took place in 2017: 57.2% of Venetians turned out, 98.1% voting "yes" to "further forms and special conditions of autonomy". Having been for a long period in history a land of mass emigration, Veneto is today one of the greatest immigrant-receiving regions in the country, with 487,493 foreigners (9.9% of the regional population; January 2018), notably including Romanians (25.2%), Moroccans (9.3%), Chinese (7.1%), Moldovans (7.0%) and Albanians (6.9%).
30
Routes
7732.38
Kilometers
172.18
Hours
Show region map
Trentino Zuid Tirol Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Trentino Zuid Tirol", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The Indo-European languages include some 449 (SIL estimate, 2018 edition) languages and dialects spoken by about or more than 3.5 billion people (roughly half of the world population). Most of the major languages belonging to language branches and groups of Europe, and Western and southern Asia, belong to the Indo-European language family. Therefore, Indo-European is the biggest language family in the world by number of mother tongue speakers (but not by number of languages in which it is the 3rd or 5th biggest). Eight of the top ten biggest languages, by number of native speakers, are Indo-European. One of these languages, English, is the De facto World Lingua Franca with an estimate of over one billion second language speakers. Each subfamily or linguistic branch in this list contains many subgroups and individual languages. Indo-European language family has 10 known branches or subfamilies, of which eight are living and two are extinct. The relation of Indo-European branches, how they are related to one another and branched from the ancestral proto-language is a matter of further research and not yet well known. There are some individual Indo-European languages that are unclassified within the language family, they are not yet classified in a branch and could be members of their own branch. The 449 Indo-European languages identified in the SIL estimate, 2018 edition, are mostly living languages, however, if all the known extinct Indo-European languages are added, they number more than 800. This list includes all known Indo-European languages, living and extinct. A distinction between a language and a dialect is not clear-cut and simple because there is, in many cases, several dialect continuums, transitional dialects and languages and also because there is no consensual standard to what amount of vocabulary, grammar, pronunciation and prosody differences there is a language or there is a dialect (mutual intelligibility can be a standard but there are closely related languages that are also mutual intelligible to some degree, even if it is an asymmetric intelligibility). Because of this, in this list, several dialect groups and some individual dialects of languages are shown (in italics), especially if a language is or was spoken by a large number of people and over a big land area, but also if it has or had divergent dialects. The ancestral population and language, Proto-Indo-Europeans that spoke Proto-Indo-European, estimated to have lived about 4500 BCE (6500 BP), at some time in the past, starting about 4000 BCE (6000 BP) expanded through migration and cultural influence. This started a complex process of population blend or population replacement, acculturation and language change of peoples in many regions of western and southern Eurasia. This process gave origin to many languages and branches of this language family. At the end of the second millennium BC Indo-European speakers were many millions and lived in a vast geographical area in most of western and southern Eurasia (including western Central Asia). In the following two millennia the number of speakers of Indo-European languages increased even further. By geographical area, Indo-European languages remained spoken in big land areas, although most of western Central Asia and Asia Minor was lost to another language family (mainly Turkic) due to Turkic expansion, conquests and settlement (after the middle of the first millennium AD and the beginning and middle of the second millennium AD respectively) and also to Mongol invasions and conquests (that changed Central Asia ethnolinguistic composition). Another land area lost to non-Indo-European languages was today's Hungary due to Magyar/Hungarian (Uralic language speakers) conquest and settlement. However, in the second half of the second millennium AD, Indo-European languages expanded their territories to North Asia (Siberia), through Russian expansion, and North America, South America, Australia and New Zealand as the result of the age of European discoveries and European conquests through the expansions of the Portuguese, Spanish, French, English and the Dutch (these peoples had the biggest continental or maritime empires in the world and their countries were major powers). The contact between different peoples and languages, especially as a result of European colonization, also gave origin to the many pidgins, creoles and mixed languages that are mainly based in Indo-European languages (many of which are spoken in island groups and coastal regions).
6
Routes
2208.07
Kilometers
44.96
Hours
Show region map
Graubunden Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Graubunden", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The canton of (the) Grisons, or canton of Graubünden, is the largest and easternmost canton of Switzerland. It has international borders with Italy, Austria, and Liechtenstein. Its German name, Graubünden, translates as the "Grey Leagues", referring to the canton's origin in three local alliances, the League of God's House, the Grey League, and the League of the Ten Jurisdictions. Grisons is also home to three of Switzerland's ethnic and linguistic groups, whose spoken languages—Swiss German, Italian, and Romansh—are all native to the canton. It is the only officially trilingual canton and the only canton where the Romansh language has official status.
2
Routes
1046.82
Kilometers
21.54
Hours
Show region map
Ticino Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Ticino", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The canton of Ticino (), formally the Republic and Canton of Ticino, is the southernmost canton of Switzerland. Ticino borders the canton of Uri to the north, the canton of Valais to the west (through the Novena Pass), the canton of Graubünden to the northeast, Italy's regions of Piedmont and Lombardy to the south and it surrounds the small Italian enclave of Campione d'Italia. Named after the river Ticino, it is the only canton where Italian is the sole official language and represents the bulk of the Italian-speaking area of Switzerland along with the southern parts of Graubünden. The land now occupied by the canton was annexed from Italian cities in the 15th century by various Swiss forces in the last transalpine campaigns of the Old Swiss Confederacy. In the Helvetic Republic, established 1798, it was divided between the two new cantons of Bellinzona and Lugano. The creation of the Swiss Confederation in 1803 saw these two cantons combine to form the modern canton of Ticino.
7
Routes
2333.27
Kilometers
45.93
Hours
Show region map
Tirol Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Tirol", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Tyrol (; historically the Tyrole; German: Tirol [tiˈʁoːl] (listen); Italian: Tirolo) is a historical region in the Alps; in Northern Italy and western Austria. The area was to Habsburg times the former County of Tyrol. The Treaty of Saint-Germain-en-Laye in 1919 divided the area into two parts: State of Tyrol; formed by North and East Tyrol, it belongs to the Republic of Austria Region of Trentino-South Tyrol; at that time still with Souramont (Cortina d'Ampezzo, Livinallongo del Col di Lana and Colle Santa Lucia) and the municipalities Valvestino, Magasa and Pedemonte, belonged to the Kingdom of Italy, since 1946 the Italian Republic.With the founding of the European region Tyrol-South Tyrol-Trentino the area has its own legal entity since 2011 in the form of a European Grouping for Territorial Cooperation.
Dolomites round trip Bellamonte
09-05-2019
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Slovenian Italien mountains round trip Triglav park
09-05-2019
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Van Zuid Tirol naar het Gardameer
08-09-2018
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Sauris und Naturpark Weissensee Rundtour
12-05-2019
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Goldeck Panoramastrasse mit Mangarten und Villacher Alpenstrasse Rundtour
12-05-2019
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Zuidelijk van Trentino
13-10-2018
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Rondje Corvara
13-10-2018
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Zuid Tirol Dolomieten Passo Special
27-08-2016
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Prattigau naar Lombardije
13-10-2018
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Dolomieten De Grote Ronde
13-10-2018
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