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The prettiest verified routes in Italy

MyRoute-app helps you with planning your dream journey! All routes on the page have been verified by our RouteXperts. De routes are categorized in regions, when you click on 'view region' you will see all verified routes for that region that are free to use.
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32
Amount of active RouteXperts (worldwide)
602
Amount of routes reviewd by RouteXperts (worldwide)
4410
Amount of downloaded routes (worldwide)
7946
Amount of visits (Italy)
41
Amount of routes verified by RouteXperts (Italy)
181
Amount of downloaded routes (Italy)
2
Routes
437.22
Kilometers
10.14
Hours
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Piemont Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Piemont", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Piedmont ( PEED-mont; Italian: Piemonte, pronounced [pjeˈmonte]; Piedmontese, Occitan and Arpitan: Piemont, Piedmontese pronunciation: [pjeˈmʊŋt]) is a region in northwest Italy, one of the 20 regions of the country. It borders the Liguria region to the south, the Lombardy and Emilia-Romagna regions to the east and the Aosta Valley region to the northwest; it also borders France to the west and Switzerland to the northeast. It has an area of 25,402 square kilometres (9,808 sq mi) and a population of 4 377 941 as of 30 November 2017. The capital of Piedmont is Turin.
1
Routes
288.72
Kilometers
5.62
Hours
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Auvergne Rhone Alpes Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Auvergne Rhone Alpes", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes or ARA (French pronunciation: [ovɛʁɲ ʁon alp] (listen), Arpitan: Ôvèrgne-Rôno-Ârpes, Occitan: Auvèrnhe Ròse Aups, Italian: Alvernia-Rodano-Alpi) is a region of France created by the territorial reform of French Regions in 2014; it resulted from the merger of Auvergne and Rhône-Alpes. The new region came into effect on 1 January 2016, after the regional elections in December 2015.The region covers an area of more than 69,711 km2 (26,916 sq mi), making it the third largest in metropolitan France, with a population of 7,695,264, second only to Île-de-France.
2
Routes
437.22
Kilometers
10.14
Hours
Show region map
Provence Alpes Cote d Azur Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Provence Alpes Cote d Azur", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Barcelonnette (French pronunciation: ​[baʁsəlɔnɛt]; Occitan: Barcilona de Provença) is a commune of France and a subprefecture in the department of Alpes-de-Haute-Provence, in the Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur region. It is located in the southern French Alps, at the crossroads between Provence, Piedmont and the Dauphiné, and is the largest town in the Ubaye Valley. The town's inhabitants are known as Barcelonnettes.
7
Routes
1913.55
Kilometers
41.48
Hours
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Karinthie Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Karinthie", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Otto III (c. 1265 – 25 May 1310), a member of the House of Gorizia (Meinhardiner dynasty), was Duke of Carinthia and Count of Tyrol from 1295 until his death. He ruled jointly with his younger brothers Louis and Henry VI.
3
Routes
876.94
Kilometers
16.47
Hours
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Tirol Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Tirol", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Tyrol (; historically the Tyrole; German: Tirol [tiˈʁoːl] (listen); Italian: Tirolo) is a historical region in the Alps; in northern Italy and western Austria. The area was to Habsburg times the former County of Tyrol. The Treaty of Saint-Germain-en-Laye in 1919 divided the area into two parts: State of Tyrol; formed by North and East Tyrol, it belongs to the Republic of Austria Region of Trentino-South Tyrol; at that time still with Souramont (Cortina d'Ampezzo, Livinallongo del Col di Lana and Colle Santa Lucia) and the municipalities Valvestino, Magasa and Pedemonte, belonged to the Kingdom of Italy, since 1946 the Italian Republic.With the founding of the European region Tyrol-South Tyrol-Trentino the area has its own legal entity since 2011 in the form of a European Grouping for Territorial Cooperation.
2
Routes
618.62
Kilometers
12.19
Hours
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Graubunden Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Graubunden", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The canton of (the) Grisons, or canton of Graubünden, is the largest and easternmost canton of Switzerland. It has international borders with Italy, Austria, and Liechtenstein. Its German name, Graubünden, translates as the "Grey Leagues", referring to the canton's origin in three local alliances, the League of God's House, the Grey League, and the League of the Ten Jurisdictions. Grisons is also home to three of Switzerland's ethnic groups, whose spoken languages—Swiss German, Italian, and Romansh—are all native to the canton. It is the only officially trilingual canton and the only canton where the Romansh language has official status.
1
Routes
215.96
Kilometers
6.43
Hours
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Emilia Romagna Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Emilia Romagna", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Emilia-Romagna (Italian pronunciation: [eˈmiːlja roˈmaɲɲa]; Emilian and Romagnol: Emélia-Rumâgna) is an administrative region of Northeast Italy comprising the historical regions of Emilia and Romagna. Its capital is Bologna. It has an area of 22,446 km2 (8,666 sq mi), and about 4.4 million inhabitants. Emilia-Romagna is one of the wealthiest and most developed regions in Europe, with the third highest GDP per capita in Italy. Bologna, its capital, has one of Italy's highest quality of life indices and advanced social services. Emilia-Romagna is also a cultural and tourist centre, being the home of the University of Bologna, the oldest university in the world, containing Romanesque and Renaissance cities (such as Modena, Parma and Ferrara), a former Eastern Roman Empire capital such as Ravenna, encompassing eleven UNESCO heritage sites, being a centre for food and automobile production (home of automotive companies such as Ferrari, Lamborghini, Maserati, Pagani, De Tomaso and Ducati) and having popular coastal resorts such as Cervia, Cesenatico, Rimini and Riccione. In 2018, the Lonely Planet guide named Emilia Romagna as the best place to see in Europe.
6
Routes
1639.09
Kilometers
36.27
Hours
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Friuli Venezia Giulia Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Friuli Venezia Giulia", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Friuli–Venezia Giulia (pronounced [friˈuːli veˈnɛttsja ˈdʒuːlja]) is one of the 20 regions of Italy, and one of five autonomous regions with special statute. The regional capital is Trieste. The city of Venice (Venezia) is not in this region, despite the name. Friuli–Venezia Giulia has an area of 7,924 km2 and about 1.2 million inhabitants. A natural opening to the sea for many Central European countries, the region is traversed by the major transport routes between the east and west of southern Europe. It encompasses the historical-geographical region of Friuli and a small portion of the historical region of Venezia Giulia – also known in English as the Julian March – each with its own distinct history, traditions and identity.
4
Routes
1285.88
Kilometers
26.21
Hours
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Lombardije Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Lombardije", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The Giro di Lombardia (English: Tour of Lombardy), officially Il Lombardia , is a cycling race in Lombardy, Italy. It is traditionally the last of the five 'Monuments' of the season, considered to be one of the most prestigious one-day events in cycling, and one of the last events on the UCI World Tour calendar. Nicknamed the Classica delle foglie morte ("the Classic of the falling (dead) leaves"), it is the most important Autumn Classic in cycling. The race's most famous climb is the Madonna del Ghisallo in the race finale. The first edition was held in 1905. Since its creation, the Giro di Lombardia has been the classic with the fewest interruptions in cycling; only the editions of 1943 and 1944 were cancelled for reasons of war. Italian Fausto Coppi won a record five times. Because of its demanding course, the race is considered a climbers classic, favouring climbers with a strong sprint finish.
1
Routes
149.45
Kilometers
3.68
Hours
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Marche Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Marche", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Marche (Italian pronunciation: [ˈmarke], Croatian: Marke), or the Marches , is one of the twenty regions of Italy. The name of the region derives from the plural name of marca, originally referring to the medieval March of Ancona and nearby marches of Camerino and Fermo. Marche is well known for its shoemaking tradition, with the finest and most luxurious Italian footwear being manufactured in this region.The region is located in the Central area of the country, bordered by Emilia-Romagna and the republic of San Marino to the north, Tuscany to the west, Umbria to the southwest, Abruzzo and Lazio to the south and the Adriatic Sea to the east. Except for river valleys and the often very narrow coastal strip, the land is hilly. A railway from Bologna to Brindisi, built in the 19th century, runs along the coast of the entire territory. Inland, the mountainous nature of the region, even today, allows relatively little travel north and south, except by twisting roads over the passes. The Umbrian enclave of Monte Ruperto (a subdivision of the Comune of Città di Castello) is entirely surrounded by the Province of Pesaro and Urbino, which constitutes the northern part of the region. Urbino, one of the major cities of the region, was the birthplace of Raphael, as well as a major center of Renaissance history.
2
Routes
419.39
Kilometers
8.57
Hours
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Sardinie Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Sardinie", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The Kingdom of Sardinia was a state in Southern Europe from the early 14th until the mid-19th century. When it was acquired by the Duke of Savoy in 1720, it was a former Iberian state as well as a member of the Council of Aragon. However, the Savoyards united it with their possessions on the Italian mainland and, by the time of the Crimean War in 1853, had built the resulting kingdom into a strong power. The composite state under the rule of Savoy in this period may be called Savoy-Sardinia or Piedmont-Sardinia, or even the Kingdom of Piedmont to emphasise that the island of Sardinia had always been of secondary importance to the monarchy. The formal name of the entire Savoyard state was the "States of His Majesty the King of Sardinia". Its final capital was Turin, the capital of Savoy since the mid 16th century. The kingdom initially consisted of the islands of Corsica and Sardinia, sovereignty over both of which was claimed by the Papacy, which granted them as a fief, the regnum Sardiniae et Corsicae ("kingdom of Sardinia and Corsica"), to King James II of Aragon in 1297. Beginning in 1324, James and his successors conquered the island of Sardinia and established de facto their de jure authority. In 1420, after the Sardinian-Catalan War, the last competing claim to the island was bought out. After the union of the crowns of Aragon and Castile, Sardinia became a part of the burgeoning Spanish Empire. In 1720, the island was ceded by the Habsburg and Bourbon claimants to the Spanish throne to Duke Victor Amadeus II of Savoy; the Kingdom came to be progressively identified with the Mainland states ruled by the main branch of the House of Savoy, which included, besides Savoy and Aosta, dynastic possessions like the Principality of Piedmont (a possession built up in the 13th century), and the County of Nice (a possession since 1388). While in theory the traditional capital of the island of Sardinia and seat of its viceroys was Cagliari, the Piedmontese city of Turin was the de facto capital of Savoy. When the mainland domains of the House of Savoy were occupied and eventually annexed by Napoleonic France, the king of Sardinia made his permanent residence on the island for the first time in its history. The Congress of Vienna (1814–15), which restructured Europe after Napoleon's defeat, returned to Savoy its mainland possessions and augmented them with Liguria, taken from the Republic of Genoa. In 1847–48, through the "Perfect Fusion", the various Savoyard states were unified under one legal system with their capital in Turin, and granted a constitution, the Statuto Albertino. There followed the annexation of Lombardy (1859), the central Italian states and the Two Sicilies (1860), Venetia (1866), and the Papal States (1870). On 17 March 1861, to more accurately reflect its new geographic extent, the Kingdom of Sardinia changed its name to the Kingdom of Italy, and its capital was eventually moved first to Florence and then to Rome. The Savoy-led Kingdom of Piedmont-Sardinia was thus the predecessor state of the Kingdom of Italy, which in turn is the predecessor of the present-day Italian Republic.
12
Routes
2031.38
Kilometers
55.34
Hours
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Toscane Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Toscane", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Cassa di Risparmio di Pistoia e della Lucchesia (literally The Savings bank of Pistoia and Lucchesia; known as Caripistoia, Caript or just CRPT in short) is an Italian regional bank based in Pistoia, Tuscany. The bank was a subsidiary of Banca CR Firenze, with Intesa Sanpaolo as the ultimate holding company.
1
Routes
149.45
Kilometers
3.68
Hours
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Umbri Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Umbri", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The Umbri were Italic peoples of ancient Italy. A region called Umbria still exists and is now occupied by Italian speakers. It is somewhat smaller than the ancient Umbria. Most ancient Umbrian cities were settled in the 9th-4th centuries BC on easily defensible hilltops. Umbria was bordered by the Tiber and Nar rivers and included the Apennine slopes on the Adriatic. The ancient Umbrian language is a branch of a group called Oscan-Umbrian, which is related to the Latino-Faliscan languages.
10
Routes
2228.59
Kilometers
53.56
Hours
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Veneto Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Veneto", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Veneto ( or ; Italian: Veneto [ˈvɛːneto]; Venetian: Vèneto [ˈvɛneto]) is one of the 20 regions of Italy. Its population is about five million, ranking fifth in Italy. The region's capital is Venice. Veneto was part of the Roman Empire until the 5th century AD. Later, after a feudal period, it was part of the Republic of Venice until 1797. Venice ruled for centuries over one of the largest and richest maritime republics and trade empires in the world. After the Napoleonic Wars and the Congress of Vienna, the Republic was annexed by the Austrian Empire, until it was merged with the Kingdom of Italy in 1866, as a result of the Third Italian War of Independence. Besides Italian, most inhabitants also speak Venetian which is divided into five varieties. Since 1971 the Statute of Veneto has referred to the region's citizens as "the Venetian people". Article 1 defines Veneto as an "autonomous Region", "constituted by the Venetian people and the lands of the provinces of Belluno, Padua, Rovigo, Treviso, Venice, Verona and Vicenza", while maintaining "bonds with Venetians in the world". Article 2 sets forth the principle of the "self-government of the Venetian people" and mandates the Region to "promote the historical identity of the Venetian people and civilisation". Despite these affirmations, approved by the Italian Parliament, Veneto is not among the autonomous regions with special statute, differently from its north-eastern and north-western neighbours, Friuli-Venezia Giulia and Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol respectively. Veneto is home to a notable nationalist movement, known as Venetian nationalism or Venetism. The region's largest party is the Liga Veneta, a founding component of the Lega Nord. The current President of Veneto is Luca Zaia (Liga Veneta–Lega Nord), re-elected in 2015 with 50.1% of the vote. Zaia II Government includes also Forza Italia and is externally supported by Independence We Veneto and the Brothers of Italy. An autonomy referendum took place in 2017: 57.2% of Venetians turned out, 98.1% voting "yes" to "further forms and special conditions of autonomy". Having been for a long period in history a land of mass emigration, Veneto is today one of the greatest immigrant-receiving regions in the country, with 487,493 foreigners (9.9% of the regional population; January 2018), notably including Romanians (25.2%), Moroccans (9.3%), Chinese (7.1%), Moldovans (7.0%) and Albanians (6.9%).
17
Routes
4179.2
Kilometers
95.32
Hours
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Trentino Zuid Tirol Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Trentino Zuid Tirol", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Most regions and provinces of Europe have alternative names in different languages. Some regions have also undergone name changes for political or other reasons. This article attempts to give all known alternative names for all major European regions, provinces, and territories. It also includes some lesser regions that are important because of their location or history. This article does not offer any opinion about what the "original", "official", "real", or "correct" name of any region is or was. Regions are (mostly) listed alphabetically by their current best-known name in English, which does not necessarily match the title of the corresponding article. The English version is followed by variants in other languages, in alphabetical order by name, and then by any historical variants and former names. Foreign names that are the same as their English equivalents may be listed.
4
Routes
1128.71
Kilometers
24.7
Hours
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Goriska Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Goriska", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Goriška is a historical region in western Slovenia on the border with Italy. It comprises the northern part of the wider traditional region of the Slovenian Littoral (Primorska). The name Goriška is an adjective referring to the city of Gorizia, its historical and cultural centre.
Zuid Tirol Dolomieten Passo Special
27-08-2016
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Zuid Tirol Dolomieten Grosse Dolomitenrunde
27-08-2016
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Col du Mont Cenis Col de la Bonette en Col de L Iseran
28-06-2016
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Parco Nazionale dei Monti Sibillini
31-12-2015
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Zuid Tirol Dolomieten Campolongo Falzarego Giau Fedaia Pordoi Campolongo
27-08-2016
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Zuid Tirol Dolomieten Campolongo Pordoi SanPellegrino Marmolada Fedaia Sella Gardena
27-08-2016
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Zuid Tirol Dolomieten Valparola Falzarego Pordoi Sella Wurzjoch
27-08-2016
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Zuid Tirol Dolomieten Campolongo Pordoi Sella Karer Sella Gardena
27-08-2016
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Zuid Tirol Dolomieten Gardena Sella Lavaze Nigerpass Grodner Joch
27-08-2016
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Zuid Tirol Dolomieten Herz der Dolomiten 11 passen in 219 km
27-08-2016
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