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The prettiest verified routes in Italy

 
MyRoute-app helps you with planning your dream journey! All routes on the page have been verified by our RouteXperts. De routes are categorized in regions, when you click on 'view region' you will see all verified routes for that region that are free to use.
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47
Amount of active RouteXperts (worldwide)
801
Amount of routes reviewed by RouteXperts (worldwide)
18202
Amount of downloaded routes (worldwide)
33194
Amount of visits (Italy)
67
Amount of routes verified by RouteXperts (Italy)
1124
Amount of downloaded routes (Italy)
Route collections
The route collections by MyRoute-app are collections of multiple routes that belong to each other and checked by MRA RouteXperts. All routes are identical for TomTom, Garmin and MyRoute-app Navigation.
10
Routes
3241.24
Kilometers
61.52
Hours
View route collection 11 day trip from the Netherlands
About this route collection
8 countries in 11 days; The Netherlands, Germany, Austria, Italy, Switzerland, France, Luxembourg and Belgium. This route collections consists of 10 routes that I have driven with friends in the summer of 2019.

The start is in Geldermalsen Netherlands, the first 7 days you drive through the Netherlands, Germany, Austria, Italy, Switzerland, France and a piece of Luxembourg with overnight stays in hotels.

The last three days you stay in Barweiler (D) in the Eifel and you drive two beautiful tours through the Eifel, Luxembourg and parts of the Belgian Ardennes.

There is no highway in the routes, only beautiful provincial and country roads, many beautiful passes with beautiful panoramas.

Be sure to check whether the passes are open before you leave.

These are routes for experienced drivers.
24
Routes
7714.34
Kilometers
161.66
Hours
View route collection The 24 Most Beautiful Alps Routes
About this route collection
The Alps, the Alps are a mountain range in Europe, stretching from the French Mediterranean coast in the southwest to the Pannonian plain in the east. The area of the mountains is more than 200,000 km².

In other words Passes and Mountain roads!

Driving through the mountains is great! Certainly over the mountain passes with hairpin bends and narrow winding roads. Every turn a different view where you can enjoy. There are many beautiful mountain passes in the Alps.

A selection that is also processed in these routes:
The Stleviopas:
The Stelvio Pass, also known as Passo dello Stelvio, is best known for the stage in the Giro d'Italia. In cycling, this pass is seen as one of the toughest tests due to the length and the difference in height. The Stelviopas reaches a maximum height of 2758 meters and is therefore one of the highest in the Alps. Bormio and Prato Allo Stelvio are connected to the pass. The pass is closed in winter due to heavy snowfall.

The Reschen pass:
The Reschen Pass, also known as Passo di Resia, connects the Austrian state of Tyrol with the Italian province of South Tyrol. The pass reaches a maximum height of 1504 meters and has been one of the most important north-south connections in the Alps in recent centuries. The pass was used well before Roman times. Along the way you pass multiple highlights and historical remains. One of the highlights is the Reschensee. This lake was created after the construction of the dam and has completely drained the village of Graun. The only thing that is reminded of this is the clock tower in the middle of the lake.

Col du Galibier:
The French mountain pass Col du Galibier connects the towns of Saint-Michel-de-Maurienne and Briançon via the Col du Lautaret in the south and the Col du Télégraphe in the north. The mountain pass is part of the Tour de France and very feared, due to the fact that it is only accessible via the other two mountain passes. The pass reaches a maximum height of 2646 meters. From there you can take a walk to the viewpoint at 2704 meters. You can admire the peaks of the Grand Galibier, Mont Blanc and La Meije, among others.

The Grossglockner High Alpine Road:
With a height of 3798 meters, the Grossglockner is the highest mountain in Austria. In order to optimally enjoy this impressive mountain, you can drive along the Grossglockner High Alpine Road and associated pass. The route starts from Bruck am Grossglockner and ends in Heiligenblut. You can of course drive both ways. The pass reaches a maximum height of 2504 meters and is closed in winter due to the heavy snowfall. Along the way you pass several stops with fun activities, information points, mountain huts and viewpoints. We recommend a visit to the Kaiser-Franz-Josefs-Höhe and Pasterzen glacier.

The Col d'Izoard:
Just like the Col du Galibier, the Col d'Izoard is also part of a stage of the Tour de France. The mountain pass connects Briançon with the valley of the Guil river. The pass lies partly in the Regional Natural Park of Queyras and reaches a maximum height of 2360 meters. The bare and rocky landscape is special about the Col d'Izoard. It sometimes seems as if you are driving over the moon by car! Along the way you can stop at several points to enjoy the beautiful view.

The Bernina pass:
The Bernina Express is one of the most famous rail trains in Switzerland and the Alps. The route is beautiful and partly included on the UNESCO World Heritage List. Parallel to the railway line is the Bernina Pass, which connects the Veltlindal with the Egandin Valley. This beautiful Alpine road has a total length of 56 kilometers and reaches a maximum height of 2328 meters. Along the way you can enjoy views of the Morteratsch Glacier, among other things.

The Sella pass:
The Sella pass, also known as Passo di Sella, takes you on one of the most impressive mountain ranges of the Dolomites: the Sella massif. The pass connects Valle di Fassa with Val Gardena and reaches a maximum height of 2236 meters. At this altitude is also the border of the Italian provinces of Trentino and Bolzano. Along the way you can enjoy the view of this spectacular mountain world. Admire, for example, the three peaks of the Sasso Lungo mountain range, the Sella mountain range or the peaks of the Marmolada. You can also drive the Sella pass in combination with the Gardena pass, Pordoi pass and Campolongo pass.

The Grimsel pass:
The Grimsel Pass connects Goms in Wallis with the Halis Valley in the Bernese Oberland. The pass reaches a maximum height of 2165 meters and is closed in winter due to snowfall. The mountain pass has played an important role in trade between Switzerland and Italy over the centuries. Now it is mainly the reservoirs that have an important function. These are used for the generation of electricity. The landscape you drive through is rugged, rocky and impressive. On top of the pass is a hotel and a restaurant with a special marmot park. The Dodensee (Totensee) is also located here. This lake owes its name to the many fallen soldiers in the time of Napoleon.

The Gotthard pass:
The Gotthard pass, also called Passo del San Gottardo and Sint-Gotthard, connects the Swiss towns of Airolo and Andermatt. The mountain pass and associated tunnel are best known among holidaymakers who travel from Switzerland to Italy. But where the majority opts for the tunnel, it is precisely the pass that really makes the holiday complete. The Gotthard pass has a length of approximately 26 kilometers and reaches a maximum height of 2106 meters. The route is beautiful and takes you past old villages and beautiful views.

The Silvretta High Alpine Road and Silvretta Pass:
The Paznaun Valley in Tyrol and the Montafon in Vorarlberg are connected by the Silvretta Hochalpenstraße. The route has a length of 22.3 kilometers and leads from Galtür to Partenen in 34 hairpin bends, via the 2032 meter high Bielerhöhe. At this point is also the Silvrettasee, where you can walk. The pass is closed in winter due to snowfall.

The Simplon pass:
Just like the Gotthard pass, many holidaymakers travel the Simplon pass every year. This mountain pass connects the Rhone valley in the Valais canton with the Valle d'Ossola in Piedmont. The pass is open all year round and reaches a maximum height of 2005 meters. Along the way you pass a number of buildings, including the famous Simplon-Hospiz from 1825. The hospiz is managed by the monks of St. Bernard. From the highest point on the pass all kinds of walking routes are possible and you will also come across a hotel where you can spend the night.

The Gerlospas:
The Gerlos Pass connects the Salzachtal in the Salzburgerland with the Zillertal in Tyrol. The pass is part of the Gerlos Alpenstraße and runs right through the Hohe Tauern National Park. Along the way you can enjoy beautiful views of the surroundings. The pass has a length of 12 kilometers and reaches a maximum height of 1531 meters. A ride on the Gerlos Pass is ideal to combine with a visit to the Krimmler Wasserfälle.

The Great St. Bernhard Pass:
The Great St. Bernhard Pass, better known as the Col du Grand Saint Bernard, connects the Italian province of Valle d'Aosta with the Swiss canton of Valais. The pass is one of the highest in Switzerland and reaches a maximum height of 2469 meters. Just like a number of other mountain passes in this list, the Great St. Bernhard Pass has been used for centuries as a connecting road. The pass has its name to think of the St. Bernard dogs who used to help stranded travelers with the monks. The pass is closed in winter.

The Timmelsjoch Hochalpenstrasse:
The Timmelsjoch Hochalpenstrasse connects the towns of Sölden in the Ötztal and Meran in South Tyrol. Toll must be paid on the route Hochgurgl - Moos. Via a mountain road with around 60 hairpin bends you drive through a beautiful mountain world. With the Timmelsjoch Experience you can find out more about the history, the road and the surroundings from various stations. You can also visit the Top Mountain Crosspoint museum.

Col de l'Iséran:
With a maximum pass height of 2770 meters, the Col l'Iséran is one of the highest mountain passes in the Alps. The pass connects Bourg-Saint-Maurice with Bonneval-sur-Arc. You pass Val-d'Isère and a side valley of the Maurienne, which is located entirely in the Vanoise National Park, along a road full of hairpin bends. You can spot animals such as marmots and chamois and there is also a restaurant with a chapel on top of the pass.

The Gaviapas:
The Gaviapass (Italian Passo di Gavia) is a mountain pass in the Italian Alps, in the Lombardy region.
It is one of the highest pass roads in Europe. The road leads right through the unspoilt Stelvio National Park. The road was laid in the First World War for the supply of Italian soldiers who fought in the Italian-Austrian border area. The pass height is one of the most beautiful in the Alps. Here lies the large Lago Bianco with, to the north, the mountain San Matteo (3684 meters). The Lago Nero is slightly lower on the south side of the pass. The Adamello mountain group determines the view here. Many well-marked walks have been plotted in the area. During the winter the pass is closed due to the enormous snowfall. The pass is often closed until May and June due to the large amount of snow.


Promoter has made a selection of the 24 Most Beautiful Alps routes they have plotted in recent years.

The routes continue through:
France
Austria
Switzerland
Italy

The most beautiful roads, the most beautiful views, the most beautiful viewpoints. The highest mountains, the fastest descents, hairpin bend after hairpin bend, you name it you can't get enough.

Are you going on holiday in this region, take advantage of it, ALL routes in this collection have been checked and made the same for TomTom, Garmin and MyRoute-app Navigation by a RouteRpert MyRoute-app.

Have fun with this collection and while driving one of these routes. Enjoy all the beauty that the Alps and the Dolomites have to offer. Click on “View route” to read the review of the chosen route.

I would like to hear your findings about the route (s).


8
Routes
1539.69
Kilometers
35.54
Hours
View route collection The 8 most beautiful routes of the Dolomites
About this route collection
The Dolomites is a mountain range in Italy that is part of the Southern Limestone Alps. Typical for the Dolomites are the steep rock walls and peaks, which were created by erosion and weathering. The mountain range is split into two parts: the eastern and the western. The highest peak of the Dolomites, the Marmolada, is 3343 meters high.

Enjoy the beautiful routes in the Marmolada area. Whichever way you head in the Dolomites, it is always incredibly beautiful. You get one (toll free) pass after the other for your wheels and it is pure enjoyment every time. A delightful playground that, depending on the hour, depending on the direction, depending on the weather, always looks different and enchants you completely!

The routes have been checked and made equal for Garmin, TomTom and MyRoute-app Navigation users. Do you have a fantastic route in the Dolomites that belongs to this list? Then send us the route via routexpert@myrouteapp.com.

Enjoy!
12
Routes
3347.26
Kilometers
68.77
Hours
View route collection The 12 most beautiful car and motorcycle routes in Carinthia
About this route collection
“Motorradland Kärnten” where you feel so wonderfully welcome as a motorcyclist!
Own website for motorcyclists, own compound routes, hotels, campsites and guest houses with attention for motorcyclists, a wonderful area where motorcyclists are very popular.

Kärnten or Carinthia, at the crossroads of the Germanic, Slavic and Roman worlds. Three cultures within a few kilometers, southern flair, culinary delights, cross-border tours. Breakfast in Italy, lunch in Slovenia, dinner in Austria - all in one day. Experience the diversity in the borderless Alps-Adriatic region, the area for motorcyclists.

Extensive day trips on winding mountain paths, romantic panoramic routes and beautiful lakes, here the 12 TOP routes Kärnten / Carinthia. Enjoy!
10
Routes
3161.24
Kilometers
65.41
Hours
Show region map
Lombardije Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Lombardije", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The Giro di Lombardia (English: Tour of Lombardy), officially Il Lombardia, is a cycling race in Lombardy, Italy. It is traditionally the last of the five 'Monuments' of the season, considered to be one of the most prestigious one-day events in cycling, and one of the last events on the UCI World Tour calendar. Nicknamed the Classica delle foglie morte ("the Classic of the falling (dead) leaves"), it is the most important Autumn Classic in cycling. The race's most famous climb is the Madonna del Ghisallo in the race finale. The first edition was held in 1905. Since its creation, the Giro di Lombardia has been the classic with the fewest interruptions in cycling; only the editions of 1943 and 1944 were cancelled for reasons of war. Italian Fausto Coppi won a record five times. Because of its demanding course, the race is considered a climbers classic, favouring climbers with a strong sprint finish.
1
Routes
303.53
Kilometers
6.57
Hours
Show region map
Sardinie Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Sardinie", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The Kingdom of Sardinia was a state in Southern Europe from the early 14th until the mid-19th century. The Kingdom was a member of the Council of Aragon and initially consisted of the islands of Corsica and Sardinia, sovereignty over both of which was claimed by the Papacy, which granted them as a fief, the regnum Sardiniae et Corsicae ("kingdom of Sardinia and Corsica"), to King James II of Aragon in 1297. Beginning in 1324, James and his successors conquered the island of Sardinia and established de facto their de jure authority. In 1420, after the Sardinian-Catalan War, the last competing claim to the island was bought out. After the union of the crowns of Aragon and Castile, Sardinia became a part of the burgeoning Spanish Empire. In 1720, the island was ceded by the Habsburg and Bourbon claimants to the Spanish throne to the Duke of Savoy Victor Amadeus II. The Savoyards united it with their historical possessions on the Italian mainland, and the Kingdom came to be progressively identified with the Mainland states, which included, besides Savoy and Aosta, dynastic possessions like the Principality of Piedmont and the County of Nice (over both of which the Savoyards had been exercising their control since the 13th century and 1388, respectively). The formal name of such composite state was the "States of His Majesty the King of Sardinia" and is referenced to as either Savoy-Sardinia, Piedmont-Sardinia, or even the Kingdom of Piedmont to emphasise that the island of Sardinia had always been of secondary importance to the monarchy. While in theory the traditional capital of the island of Sardinia and the seat of its viceroys had always been Cagliari, it was the Piedmontese city of Turin, the capital of Savoy since the mid 16th century, the de facto chosen seat of power under Savoyard rule. When the Mainland domains of the House of Savoy were occupied and eventually annexed by Napoleonic France, the king of Sardinia temporarily resided on the island for the first time in Sardinia's history under Savoyard rule. The Congress of Vienna (1814–15), which restructured Europe after Napoleon's defeat, returned to Savoy its Mainland possessions and augmented them with Liguria, taken from the Republic of Genoa. In 1847–48, through an act of Union analogous to the Irish-British one, the various Savoyard states were unified under one legal system with their capital in Turin, and granted a constitution, the Statuto Albertino. By the time of the Crimean War in 1853, the Savoyards had built the kingdom into a strong power. There followed the annexation of Lombardy (1859), the central Italian states and the Two Sicilies (1860), Venetia (1866), and the Papal States (1870). On 17 March 1861, to more accurately reflect its new geographic extent, the Kingdom of Sardinia changed its name to the Kingdom of Italy, and its capital was eventually moved first to Florence and then to Rome. The Savoy-led Kingdom of Piedmont-Sardinia was thus the legal predecessor of the Kingdom of Italy, which in turn is the predecessor of the present-day Italian Republic.
2
Routes
921.27
Kilometers
19.24
Hours
Show region map
Piemont Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Piemont", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Piedmont ( PEED-mont; Italian: Piemonte, pronounced [pjeˈmonte]; Piedmontese, Occitan and Arpitan: Piemont, Piedmontese pronunciation: [pjeˈmʊŋt]) is a region in northwest Italy, one of the 20 regions of the country. It borders the Liguria region to the south, the Lombardy and Emilia-Romagna regions to the east and the Aosta Valley region to the northwest; it also borders Switzerland to the northeast and France to the west. It has an area of 25,402 square kilometres (9,808 sq mi) and a population of 4,377,941 as of 30 November 2017. The capital of Piedmont is Turin.
1
Routes
280.89
Kilometers
5.97
Hours
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Apulie Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Apulie", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Eremburga of Mortain (Eremburge de Mortain) was the second wife of Count Roger I of Sicily and thus the second Sicilian countess. She is very obscure and details of her life are almost unknown to us today. Her father was either William, Count of Mortain or Robert d'Eu, and if he was Eremburga's father, then her mother was called Beatrix. Roger married Eremburga in 1077 and she bore him several daughters and one son. Sources about her children gives many contradictory information. Eremburga's children were: Matilda, wife of Count Ranulf II of Alife and mother of Robert Flandina, wife of Henry del Vasto, whose sister Adelaide del Vasto married Roger after Eremburga's death Constance (Matilda), wife of Conrad II of Italy Judith, who founded a Cluniac abbey at Sciacca Mauger, Count of TroinaSon of Flandina was Count Simon of Policastro. It is possible that Felicia of Sicily, mother of Stephen II of Hungary, was Eremburga's daughter, and Geoffrey, Count of Ragusa was maybe Eremburga's son. Another possible Eremburga's child was Princess Muriel. According to Goffredo Malaterra, Eremburga died in 1089.
1
Routes
158.9
Kilometers
3.31
Hours
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Basilicata Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Basilicata", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Basilicata (UK: , US: , Italian: [baziliˈkaːta]), also known by its ancient name Lucania (, also US: , Italian: [luˈkaːnja]), is a region in Southern Italy, bordering on Campania to the west, Apulia (Puglia) to the north and east, and Calabria to the south. It also has two coastlines: a 30-km stretch on the Tyrrhenian Sea between Campania and Calabria, and a longer coastline along the Gulf of Taranto between Calabria and Apulia. The region can be thought of as the "instep" of Italy, with Calabria functioning as the "toe" and Apulia the "heel". The region covers about 10,000 km2 (3,900 sq mi) and in 2010 had a population slightly under 600,000. The regional capital is Potenza. The region is divided into two provinces: Potenza and Matera.Basilicata is an emerging tourist destination, thanks in particular to the city of Matera, whose historical quarter I Sassi became a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1993, and has been designated European Capital of Culture 2019. The New York Times ranked Basilicata third in its list of "52 Places to Go in 2018", defining it "Italy’s best-kept secret".
1
Routes
288.73
Kilometers
5.56
Hours
Show region map
Auvergne Rhone Alpes Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Auvergne Rhone Alpes", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes (ARA; French: [ovɛʁɲ ʁon‿alp] (listen); Arpitan: Ôvèrgne-Rôno-Ârpes; Occitan: Auvèrnhe Ròse Aups; Italian: Alvernia-Rodano-Alpi) is a region in southeast-central France created by the territorial reform of French Regions in 2015; it resulted from the merger of Auvergne and Rhône-Alpes. The new region came into effect on 1 January 2016, after the regional elections in December 2015.The region covers an area of more than 69,711 km2 (26,916 sq mi), making it the third largest in metropolitan France, and has a population of 7,877,698, second only to Île-de-France. It consists of 12 departments and one territorial collectivity. Lyon is the chef-lieu of the region. This new region combines diverse geographical, sociological, economic, and cultural regions, which was already true of Rhône-Alpes, as well as Auvergne, to a lesser extent. While the old Rhône-Alpes and Auvergne regions each enjoyed a unity defined by axes of communication and the pull of their respective metropoles, the new combination is heterogeneous, and sustained lively opposition from some local officials after its creation.
1
Routes
242.88
Kilometers
5.39
Hours
Show region map
Lazio Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Lazio", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Lazio (UK: , US: , Italian: [ˈlattsjo]; Latin: Latium) is one of the 20 administrative regions of Italy. Situated in the central peninsular section of the country, it has almost 5.9 million inhabitants – making it the second most populated region of Italy (after Lombardy and just a little ahead of Campania) – and its GDP of more than 170 billion euros per annum means that it has the nation's second largest regional economy. The capital of Lazio is Rome, which is also Italy's capital and the country's largest city.
6
Routes
1574.49
Kilometers
35.07
Hours
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Goriska Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Goriska", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Goriška is a historical region in western Slovenia on the border with Italy. It comprises the northern part of the wider traditional region of the Slovenian Littoral (Primorska). The name Goriška is an adjective referring to the city of Gorizia, its historical and cultural centre.
2
Routes
1046.69
Kilometers
21.55
Hours
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Ticino Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Ticino", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The canton of Ticino (), formally the Republic and Canton of Ticino, is the southernmost canton of Switzerland. Ticino borders the canton of Uri to the north, the canton of Valais to the west (through the Novena Pass), the canton of Graubünden to the northeast, Italy's regions of Piedmont and Lombardy to the south and it surrounds the small Italian enclave of Campione d'Italia. Named after the river Ticino, it is the only canton where Italian is the sole official language and represents the bulk of the Italian-speaking area of Switzerland along with the southern parts of Graubünden. The land now occupied by the canton was annexed from Italian cities in the 15th century by various Swiss forces in the last transalpine campaigns of the Old Swiss Confederacy. In the Helvetic Republic, established 1798, it was divided between the two new cantons of Bellinzona and Lugano. The creation of the Swiss Confederation in 1803 saw these two cantons combine to form the modern canton of Ticino.
6
Routes
2207.98
Kilometers
44.95
Hours
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Graubunden Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Graubunden", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The canton of (the) Grisons, or canton of Graubünden, is the largest and easternmost canton of Switzerland. It has international borders with Italy, Austria, and Liechtenstein. Its German name, Graubünden, translates as the "Grey Leagues", referring to the canton's origin in three local alliances, the League of God's House, the Grey League, and the League of the Ten Jurisdictions. Grisons is the only officially trilingual canton and the only one where the Romansh language has official status. Swiss German, Italian, and Romansh are all native to the canton.
1
Routes
284.85
Kilometers
7.72
Hours
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Ligurie Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Ligurie", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Liguria (, Italian: [liˈɡuːrja]; Ligurian: Ligûria [liˈɡyːɾja]) is a region of north-western Italy; its capital is Genoa. Its territory is crossed by the Alps and the Apennines mountains chains. Liguria is bordered by France (Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur) to the west, Piedmont to the north, and Emilia-Romagna and Tuscany to the east. It lies on the Ligurian Sea. The region is part of the Alps-Mediterranean Euroregion.
1
Routes
220.35
Kilometers
4.9
Hours
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Umbri Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Umbri", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The Umbri were Italic people of ancient Italy. A region called Umbria still exists and is now occupied by Italian speakers. It is somewhat smaller than the ancient Umbria. Most ancient Umbrian cities were settled in the 9th-4th centuries BC on easily defensible hilltops. Umbria was bordered by the Tiber and Nar rivers and included the Apennine slopes on the Adriatic. The ancient Umbrian language is a branch of a group called Oscan-Umbrian, which is related to the Latino-Faliscan languages.
1
Routes
215.96
Kilometers
6.43
Hours
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Emilia Romagna Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Emilia Romagna", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Emilia-Romagna (UK: , US: , both also ; Italian: [eˈmiːlja roˈmaɲɲa]; Emilian and Romagnol: Emélia-Rumâgna) is one of the 20 administrative regions of Italy, situated in the northeast section of the country, comprising the historical regions of Emilia and Romagna. Its capital is Bologna. It has an area of 22,446 km2 (8,666 sq mi), and about 4.4 million inhabitants. Emilia-Romagna is one of the wealthiest and most developed regions in Europe, with the third highest GDP per capita in Italy. Bologna, its capital, has one of Italy's highest quality of life indices and advanced social services. Emilia-Romagna is also a cultural, economic and tourist center: being the home of the University of Bologna, the oldest university in the world; containing Romanesque and Renaissance cities (such as Modena, Parma and Ferrara) and the former Eastern Roman Empire capital of Ravenna; encompassing eleven UNESCO heritage sites; being a center for food and automobile production (home of automotive companies such as Ferrari, Lamborghini, Maserati, Pagani, De Tomaso, Dallara, and Ducati); and having popular coastal resorts such as Cervia, Cesenatico, Rimini and Riccione. In 2018, the Lonely Planet guide named Emilia Romagna as the best place to see in Europe.
11
Routes
2848.16
Kilometers
62.8
Hours
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Friuli Venezia Giulia Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Friuli Venezia Giulia", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Friuli Venezia Giulia (pronounced [friˈuːli veˈnɛttsja ˈdʒuːlja]) is one of the 20 regions of Italy, and one of five autonomous regions with special statute. The regional capital is Trieste. The name used to be hyphenated as Friuli-Venezia Giulia until 2001. The region is called Friûl Vignesie Julie in Friulian and Furlanija Julijska krajina in Slovene, two languages spoken in the region. The city of Venice ("Venezia") is not in this region, despite the name. Friuli Venezia Giulia has an area of 7,924 km2 and about 1.2 million inhabitants. A natural opening to the sea for many Central European countries, the region is traversed by the major transport routes between the east and west of southern Europe. It encompasses the historical-geographical region of Friuli and a small portion of the historical region of Venezia Giulia – also known in English as the Julian March – each with its own distinct history, traditions and identity.
1
Routes
167.92
Kilometers
3.31
Hours
Show region map
Molise Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Molise", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Molise (UK: , US: , Italian: [moˈliːze]; Molisano: Mulise) is a region of Southern Italy. Until 1963, it formed part of the region of Abruzzi e Molise, alongside the region of Abruzzo. The split, which did not become effective until 1970, makes Molise the youngest region in Italy. Covering 4,438 square kilometres (1,714 sq mi), it is the second smallest region in the country after the Aosta Valley, and has a population of 313,348 (as of 1 January 2015). The region is split into two provinces, named after their respective capitals Campobasso and Isernia. Campobasso also serves as the regional capital.
7
Routes
2333.05
Kilometers
46.11
Hours
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Tirol Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Tirol", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Tyrol (; historically the Tyrole; German: Tirol [tiˈʁoːl] (listen); Italian: Tirolo) is a historical region in the Alps; in Northern Italy and western Austria. The area was historically the core of the County of Tyrol, part of the Holy Roman Empire, Austrian Empire and Austria-Hungary, from its formation in the 12th century until 1919. In 1919, following World War I and dissolution of Austria-Hungary, it was divided into two modern administrative parts through the Treaty of Saint-Germain-en-Laye: State of Tyrol; formed through the merger of North and East Tyrol, as part of Austria Region of Trentino-South Tyrol; at that time still with Souramont (Cortina d'Ampezzo, Livinallongo del Col di Lana and Colle Santa Lucia) and the municipalities Valvestino, Magasa and Pedemonte, seized in 1918 by the Kingdom of Italy, and thus since 1946 part of the Italian Republic.With the founding of the European region Tyrol-South Tyrol-Trentino the area has its own legal entity since 2011 in the form of a European Grouping for Territorial Cooperation.
30
Routes
7732.18
Kilometers
172.1
Hours
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Trentino Zuid Tirol Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Trentino Zuid Tirol", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The Indo-European languages include some 449 (SIL estimate, 2018 edition) languages and dialects spoken by about or more than 3.5 billion people (roughly half of the world population). Most of the major languages belonging to language branches and groups of Europe, and Western and southern Asia, belong to the Indo-European language family. Therefore, Indo-European is the biggest language family in the world by number of mother tongue speakers (but not by number of languages in which it is the 3rd or 5th biggest). Eight of the top ten biggest languages, by number of native speakers, are Indo-European. One of these languages, English, is the De facto World Lingua Franca with an estimate of over one billion second language speakers. Each subfamily or linguistic branch in this list contains many subgroups and individual languages. Indo-European language family has 10 known branches or subfamilies, of which eight are living and two are extinct. The relation of Indo-European branches, how they are related to one another and branched from the ancestral proto-language is a matter of further research and not yet well known. There are some individual Indo-European languages that are unclassified within the language family, they are not yet classified in a branch and could be members of their own branch. The 449 Indo-European languages identified in the SIL estimate, 2018 edition, are mostly living languages, however, if all the known extinct Indo-European languages are added, they number more than 800. This list includes all known Indo-European languages, living and extinct. A distinction between a language and a dialect is not clear-cut and simple because there is, in many cases, several dialect continuums, transitional dialects and languages and also because there is no consensual standard to what amount of vocabulary, grammar, pronunciation and prosody differences there is a language or there is a dialect (mutual intelligibility can be a standard but there are closely related languages that are also mutual intelligible to some degree, even if it is an asymmetric intelligibility). Because of this, in this list, several dialect groups and some individual dialects of languages are shown (in italics), especially if a language is or was spoken by a large number of people and over a big land area, but also if it has or had divergent dialects. The ancestral population and language, Proto-Indo-Europeans that spoke Proto-Indo-European, estimated to have lived about 4500 BCE (6500 BP), at some time in the past, starting about 4000 BCE (6000 BP) expanded through migration and cultural influence. This started a complex process of population blend or population replacement, acculturation and language change of peoples in many regions of western and southern Eurasia. This process gave origin to many languages and branches of this language family. At the end of the second millennium BC Indo-European speakers were many millions and lived in a vast geographical area in most of western and southern Eurasia (including western Central Asia). In the following two millennia the number of speakers of Indo-European languages increased even further. By geographical area, Indo-European languages remained spoken in big land areas, although most of western Central Asia and Asia Minor was lost to another language family (mainly Turkic) due to Turkic expansion, conquests and settlement (after the middle of the first millennium AD and the beginning and middle of the second millennium AD respectively) and also to Mongol invasions and conquests (that changed Central Asia ethnolinguistic composition). Another land area lost to non-Indo-European languages was today's Hungary due to Magyar/Hungarian (Uralic language speakers) conquest and settlement. However, in the second half of the second millennium AD, Indo-European languages expanded their territories to North Asia (Siberia), through Russian expansion, and North America, South America, Australia and New Zealand as the result of the age of European discoveries and European conquests through the expansions of the Portuguese, Spanish, French, English and the Dutch (these peoples had the biggest continental or maritime empires in the world and their countries were major powers). The contact between different peoples and languages, especially as a result of European colonization, also gave origin to the many pidgins, creoles and mixed languages that are mainly based in Indo-European languages (many of which are spoken in island groups and coastal regions).
1
Routes
296
Kilometers
6.48
Hours
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Sicilie Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Sicilie", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The Kingdom of the Two Sicilies (Neapolitan: Regno dê Doje Sicilie; Sicilian: Regnu dî Dui Sicili; Italian: Regno delle Due Sicilie; Spanish: Reino de las Dos Sicilias) was a kingdom located in Southern Italy from 1816–1860. The kingdom was the largest sovereign state in Italy prior to Italian unification, comprising Sicily and all of Peninsula Italy south of the Papal States, covering most of the area of today's Mezzogiorno. The kingdom was formed when the Kingdom of Sicily merged with the Kingdom of Naples, which was officially known as the Kingdom of Sicily. Since both kingdoms were named Sicily, they were collectively known as the "Two Sicilies" (Utraque Sicilia, literally "both Sicilies"), and the unified kingdom adopted this name. The King of the Two Sicilies was overthrown by Giuseppe Garibaldi in 1860, after which the people voted in a plebiscite to join the Savoyard Kingdom of Sardinia. The annexation of the Two Sicilies completed the first phase of Italian unification, and the new Kingdom of Italy was proclaimed in 1861. The Two Sicilies were heavily agricultural, like the other Italian states. By 1750, the Catholic Church owned 50–65% of the land. Seeking greater opportunity, many of its inhabitants emigrated to the Americas.
17
Routes
4025.55
Kilometers
92.02
Hours
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Veneto Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Veneto", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Veneto (US: , Italian: [ˈvɛːneto]; Venetian: Vèneto [ˈvɛneto] or Venetia is one of the 20 regions of Italy. Its population is about five million, ranking fifth in Italy. The region's capital is Venice. Veneto was part of the Roman Empire until the 5th century AD. Later, after a feudal period, it was part of the Republic of Venice until 1797. Venice ruled for centuries over one of the largest and richest maritime republics and trade empires in the world. After the Napoleonic Wars and the Congress of Vienna, the Republic was annexed by the Austrian Empire, until it was merged with the Kingdom of Italy in 1866, as a result of the Third Italian War of Independence. Besides Italian, most inhabitants also speak Venetian which is divided into five varieties. Since 1971 the Statute of Veneto has referred to the region's citizens as "the Venetian people". Article 1 defines Veneto as an "autonomous Region", "constituted by the Venetian people and the lands of the provinces of Belluno, Padua, Rovigo, Treviso, Venice, Verona and Vicenza", while maintaining "bonds with Venetians in the world". Article 2 sets forth the principle of the "self-government of the Venetian people" and mandates the Region to "promote the historical identity of the Venetian people and civilisation". Despite these affirmations, approved by the Italian Parliament, Veneto is not among the autonomous regions with special statute, differently from its north-eastern and north-western neighbours, Friuli-Venezia Giulia and Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol respectively. Veneto is home to a notable nationalist movement, known as Venetian nationalism or Venetism. The region's largest party is the Liga Veneta, a founding component of the Lega Nord. The current President of Veneto is Luca Zaia (Liga Veneta–Lega Nord), re-elected in 2015 with 50.1% of the vote. Zaia II Government includes also Forza Italia and is externally supported by Independence We Veneto and the Brothers of Italy. An autonomy referendum took place in 2017: 57.2% of Venetians turned out, 98.1% voting "yes" to "further forms and special conditions of autonomy". Having been for a long period in history a land of mass emigration, Veneto is today one of the greatest immigrant-receiving regions in the country, with 487,493 foreigners (9.9% of the regional population; January 2018), notably including Romanians (25.2%), Moroccans (9.3%), Chinese (7.1%), Moldovans (7.0%) and Albanians (6.9%).
1
Routes
181.85
Kilometers
5.42
Hours
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Campania Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Campania", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Campania (, also UK: , US: , Italian: [kamˈpaːnja], Neapolitan: [kamˈbɑːnjə]) is a region in Southern Italy. As of 2018, the region has a population of around 5,820,000 people, making it the third-most-populous region of Italy; its total area of 13,590 km2 (5,247 sq mi) makes it the most densely populated region in the country. Located on the south-western portion of the Italian Peninsula, with the Tyrrhenian Sea to the west, it includes the small Phlegraean Islands and Capri for administration as part of the region. Coastal areas in the region were colonised by Ancient Greeks between 8th and 7th centuries BC, becoming part of the so-called Magna Græcia. The capital city of Campania is Naples. Campania is rich in culture, especially in regard to gastronomy, music, architecture, archeological and ancient sites such as Pompeii, Herculaneum, Oplontis, Paestum, Aeclanum, Stabiae and Velia. The name of Campania itself is derived from Latin, as the Romans knew the region as Campania felix, which translates into English as "fertile countryside" or "happy countryside". The rich natural beauty of Campania makes it highly important in the tourism industry, especially along the Amalfi Coast, Mount Vesuvius and the island of Capri.
1
Routes
199.01
Kilometers
4.36
Hours
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Abruzzen Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Abruzzen", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Heinrich Federer (6 October 1866 – 29 April 1928) was a Swiss writer and Catholic priest.
11
Routes
3007.16
Kilometers
64.82
Hours
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Karinthie Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Karinthie", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Otto III (c. 1265 – 25 May 1310), a member of the House of Gorizia (Meinhardiner dynasty), was Duke of Carinthia and Count of Tyrol from 1295 until his death. He ruled jointly with his younger brothers Louis and Henry VI.
12
Routes
2031.38
Kilometers
55.34
Hours
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Toscane Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Toscane", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Cassa di Risparmio di Pistoia e della Lucchesia (literally The Savings bank of Pistoia and Lucchesia; known as Caripistoia, Caript or just CRPT in short) is an Italian regional bank based in Pistoia, Tuscany. The bank was a subsidiary of Banca CR Firenze, with Intesa Sanpaolo as the ultimate holding company.
1
Routes
220.35
Kilometers
4.9
Hours
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Marche Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Marche", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Marche ( MAR-kay, Italian: [ˈmarke] (listen)) or the Marches ( MAR-chiz) is one of the twenty regions of Italy. The name of the region derives from the plural name of marca, originally referring to the medieval March of Ancona and nearby marches of Camerino and Fermo. Marche is well known for its shoemaking tradition, with the finest and most luxurious Italian footwear being manufactured in this region.The region is located in the Central area of the country, bordered by Emilia-Romagna and the republic of San Marino to the north, Tuscany to the west, Umbria to the southwest, Abruzzo and Lazio to the south and the Adriatic Sea to the east. Except for river valleys and the often very narrow coastal strip, the land is hilly. A railway from Bologna to Brindisi, built in the 19th century, runs along the coast of the entire territory. Inland, the mountainous nature of the region, even today, allows relatively little travel north and south, except by twisting roads over the passes. The Umbrian enclave of Monte Ruperto (a subdivision of the Comune of Città di Castello) is entirely surrounded by the Province of Pesaro and Urbino, which constitutes the northern part of the region. Urbino, one of the major cities of the region, was the birthplace of Raphael, as well as a major center of Renaissance history.
1
Routes
288.73
Kilometers
5.56
Hours
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Provence Alpes Cote d Azur Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Provence Alpes Cote d Azur", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur (French: [pʁɔvɑ̃s‿alp kot d‿azyʁ]; Occitan: Provença-Aups-Còsta d'Azur; Italian: Provenza-Alpi-Costa Azzurra; Région Sud) is one of the 18 administrative regions of France, the far southeastern on the mainland. Its capital is Marseille. The region is roughly coterminous with the former French province of Provence, with the addition of the following adjacent areas: the former papal territory of Avignon, known as Comtat Venaissin; the former Sardinian-Piedmontese county of Nice, whose coastline is known in English as the French Riviera, and in French as the Côte d'Azur; and the southeastern part of the former French province of Dauphiné, in the French Alps. Previously known by the acronym PACA, the region adopted the name Région Sud as a commercial name or nickname in December 2017. 4,935,576 people live in the region according to the 2012 census. It encompasses six departments in Southeastern France: Alpes-de-Haute-Provence, Alpes-Maritimes, Bouches-du-Rhône, Hautes-Alpes, Var and Vaucluse. It is bounded to the east by the France-Italy border, to the south by the Mediterranean Sea and by the Principality of Monaco, to the north by Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes, and to the west by Occitanie, with the Rhône river marking its westernmost border. The region logotype displays the coat of arms created in the 1990s and which combines the coats of arms of the old provinces making up Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur. Economically, the region is the third most important in France, just behind Île-de-France and Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes. Its GDP in 2012 was €142.4 billion (US$183.1 billion) while its per capita GDP was €28,861 ($US 37,121).
Round trip from Termoli
24-10-2019
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Drautal Dreilaendertour mit Special Manghenpass
12-03-2019
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I Dolomieten Tenna Brenta Val di Genova Mendola
13-10-2017
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Schinkenstadt San Daniele und Monte Zoncolan Rundtour
13-03-2019
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Binnendoor naar Lombardije van Oberammergau naar Edolo
13-10-2018
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Gardameer naar de Berninapas
13-10-2018
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Austria Italy round trip Hermagor
18-06-2019
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Dolomites round trip Bellamonte Passo Manghen
12-06-2019
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Lesina Marina to Bari
31-10-2019
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Rondje Wallis en Tessin vanuit Andermatt
13-10-2018
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