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The prettiest verified routes in Italy

MyRoute-app helps you with planning your dream journey! All routes on the page have been verified by our RouteXperts. De routes are categorized in regions, when you click on 'view region' you will see all verified routes for that region that are free to use.
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35
Amount of active RouteXperts (worldwide)
404
Amount of routes reviewd by RouteXperts (worldwide)
3087
Amount of downloaded routes (worldwide)
3028
Amount of visits (Italy)
26
Amount of routes verified by RouteXperts (Italy)
152
Amount of downloaded routes (Italy)
1
Routes
393.05
Kilometers
7.22
Hours
Show region map
Zuid Tirol Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Zuid Tirol", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Below is list of Dutch language exonyms for places in non-Dutch-speaking areas of Europe
3
Routes
1155.86
Kilometers
22.38
Hours
Show region map
Karinthie Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Karinthie", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Otto III (c. 1265 – 25 May 1310), a member of the House of Gorizia (Meinhardiner dynasty), was Duke of Carinthia and Count of Tyrol from 1295 until his death. He ruled jointly with his younger brothers Louis and Henry VI.
1
Routes
149.45
Kilometers
3.68
Hours
Show region map
Umbri Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Umbri ", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The Umbri were Italic peoples of ancient Italy. A region called Umbria still exists and is now occupied by Italian speakers. It is somewhat smaller than the ancient Umbria. Most ancient Umbrian cities were settled in the 9th-4th centuries BC on easily defensible hilltops. Umbria was bordered by the Tiber and Nar rivers and included the Apennine slopes on the Adriatic. The ancient Umbrian language is a branch of a group called Oscan-Umbrian, which is related to the Latino-Faliscan languages.
1
Routes
149.45
Kilometers
3.68
Hours
Show region map
Marche Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Marche", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Marche (Italian pronunciation: [ˈmarke], Croatian: Marke), or the Marches , is one of the twenty regions of Italy. The name of the region derives from the plural name of marca, originally referring to the medieval March of Ancona and nearby marches of Camerino and Fermo. Marche is well known for its shoemaking tradition, with the finest and most luxurious Italian footwear being manufactured in this region. The region is located in the Central area of the country, bordered by Emilia-Romagna and the republic of San Marino to the north, Tuscany to the west, Umbria to the southwest, Abruzzo and Lazio to the south and the Adriatic Sea to the east. Except for river valleys and the often very narrow coastal strip, the land is hilly. A railway from Bologna to Brindisi, built in the 19th century, runs along the coast of the entire territory. Inland, the mountainous nature of the region, even today, allows relatively little travel north and south, except by twisting roads over the passes. The Umbrian enclave of Monte Ruperto (a subdivision of the Comune of Città di Castello) is entirely surrounded by the Province of Pesaro and Urbino, which constitutes the northern part of the region. Urbino, one of the major cities of the region, was the birthplace of Raphael, as well as a major center of Renaissance history.
1
Routes
149.45
Kilometers
3.68
Hours
Show region map
Parco Nazionale dei Monti Sibillini Creste Alte del Monte Bicco Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article " Parco Nazionale dei Monti Sibillini Creste Alte del Monte Bicco", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
5
Routes
2069.32
Kilometers
39.17
Hours
Show region map
Julische Alpen Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Julische Alpen", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Rjavina is a mountain in Slovenian Julian Alps. It rises 2,532 m (8,307 ft) above sea level. Located between two Alpine glacial valleys, Kot and Krma, it offers nice views to some of the highest Slovenian peaks, including Triglav, Škrlatica and Rž. Southeast of the peak there lies one of the highest alpine huts in Slovenia, The Valentin Stanič lodge, at 2,332 m (7,651 ft) above sea level.
1
Routes
393.05
Kilometers
7.22
Hours
Show region map
zuid tirol Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "zuid tirol", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Below is list of Dutch language exonyms for places in non-Dutch-speaking areas of Europe
1
Routes
393.05
Kilometers
7.22
Hours
Show region map
https nominatimopenstreetmaporgsearchphpqZuidTirolpolyg Open region
1
Routes
393.05
Kilometers
7.22
Hours
Show region map
https nominatimopenstreetmaporgsearchphpqZuidTirolpolyg Open region
1
Routes
393.05
Kilometers
7.22
Hours
Show region map
Zuid Tirol Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Zuid Tirol", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Below is list of Dutch language exonyms for places in non-Dutch-speaking areas of Europe
1
Routes
393.05
Kilometers
7.22
Hours
Show region map
Zuid Tirol Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Zuid Tirol", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Below is list of Dutch language exonyms for places in non-Dutch-speaking areas of Europe
1
Routes
393.05
Kilometers
7.22
Hours
Show region map
Zuid Tirol Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Zuid Tirol", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Below is list of Dutch language exonyms for places in non-Dutch-speaking areas of Europe
1
Routes
393.05
Kilometers
7.22
Hours
Show region map
Zuid Tirol Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Zuid Tirol", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Below is list of Dutch language exonyms for places in non-Dutch-speaking areas of Europe
1
Routes
393.05
Kilometers
7.22
Hours
Show region map
Zuid Tirol Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Zuid Tirol", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Below is list of Dutch language exonyms for places in non-Dutch-speaking areas of Europe
1
Routes
393.05
Kilometers
7.22
Hours
Show region map
Zuid Tirol Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Zuid Tirol", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Below is list of Dutch language exonyms for places in non-Dutch-speaking areas of Europe
1
Routes
393.05
Kilometers
7.22
Hours
Show region map
Zuid Tirol Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Zuid Tirol", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Below is list of Dutch language exonyms for places in non-Dutch-speaking areas of Europe
1
Routes
393.05
Kilometers
7.22
Hours
Show region map
Zuid Tirol Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Zuid Tirol", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Below is list of Dutch language exonyms for places in non-Dutch-speaking areas of Europe
1
Routes
393.05
Kilometers
7.22
Hours
Show region map
Zuid Tirol Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Zuid Tirol", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Below is list of Dutch language exonyms for places in non-Dutch-speaking areas of Europe
1
Routes
393.05
Kilometers
7.22
Hours
Show region map
Zuid Tirol Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Zuid Tirol", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Below is list of Dutch language exonyms for places in non-Dutch-speaking areas of Europe
6
Routes
2375.49
Kilometers
46.14
Hours
Show region map
Friuli Venezia Giulia Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Friuli Venezia Giulia", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Friuli–Venezia Giulia (pronounced [friˈuːli veˈnɛttsja ˈdʒuːlja]) is one of the 20 regions of Italy, and one of five autonomous regions with special statute. The regional capital is Trieste. The city of Venice (Venezia) is not in this region, despite the name. Friuli–Venezia Giulia has an area of 7,924 km2 and about 1.2 million inhabitants. A natural opening to the sea for many Central European countries, the region is traversed by the major transport routes between the east and west of southern Europe. It encompasses the historical-geographical region of Friuli and a small portion of the historical region of Venezia Giulia – also known in English as the Julian March – each with its own distinct history, traditions and identity.
6
Routes
2375.49
Kilometers
46.14
Hours
Show region map
Friuli Venezia Giulia Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Friuli Venezia Giulia", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Friuli–Venezia Giulia (pronounced [friˈuːli veˈnɛttsja ˈdʒuːlja]) is one of the 20 regions of Italy, and one of five autonomous regions with special statute. The regional capital is Trieste. The city of Venice (Venezia) is not in this region, despite the name. Friuli–Venezia Giulia has an area of 7,924 km2 and about 1.2 million inhabitants. A natural opening to the sea for many Central European countries, the region is traversed by the major transport routes between the east and west of southern Europe. It encompasses the historical-geographical region of Friuli and a small portion of the historical region of Venezia Giulia – also known in English as the Julian March – each with its own distinct history, traditions and identity.
5
Routes
2069.32
Kilometers
39.17
Hours
Show region map
Slovenia Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Slovenia", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Slovenia ( (listen) sloh-VEE-nee-ə; Slovene: Slovenija [slɔˈʋèːnija]), officially the Republic of Slovenia (Slovene: Republika Slovenija , abbr.: RS), is a sovereign state located in southern Central Europe at a crossroads of important European cultural and trade routes. It is bordered by Italy to the west, Austria to the north, Hungary to the northeast, Croatia to the southeast, and the Adriatic Sea to the southwest. It covers 20,273 square kilometers (7,827 sq mi) and has a population of 2.07 million. One of the successor states of the former Yugoslavia, Slovenia is a parliamentary republic and a member of the United Nations, of the European Union, and of NATO. The capital and largest city is Ljubljana.Slovenia has a mostly mountainous terrain with a mainly continental climate, with the exception of the Slovene Littoral, which has a sub-Mediterranean climate, and of the northwest, which has an Alpine climate. Additionally, the Dinaric Alps and the Pannonian Plain meet on the territory of Slovenia. The country, marked by a significant biological diversity, is one of the most water-rich in Europe, with a dense river network, a rich aquifer system, and significant karst underground watercourses. Over half of the territory is covered by forest. The human settlement of Slovenia is dispersed and uneven.Slovenia has historically been the crossroads of Slavic, Germanic, and Romance languages and cultures. Although the population is not homogeneous, Slovenes comprise the majority. The South Slavic language Slovene is the official language throughout the country. Slovenia is a largely secularized country, but Catholicism and Lutheranism have significantly influenced its culture and identity. The economy of Slovenia is small, open and export-oriented and has been strongly influenced by international conditions. It has been severely hurt by the Eurozone crisis which started in 2009. The main economic field is services, followed by industry and construction.Historically, the current territory of Slovenia has formed part of many different states, including the Roman Empire, Byzantine Empire, Carolingian Empire and the Holy Roman Empire, the Habsburg Monarchy, the Republic of Venice, the French-administered Illyrian Provinces of Napoleon I, the Austrian Empire and Austria-Hungary. In October 1918 the Slovenes exercised self-determination for the first time by co-founding the State of Slovenes, Croats and Serbs. In December 1918 they merged with the Kingdom of Serbia into the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes (renamed Kingdom of Yugoslavia in 1929). During World War II (1939–1945) Germany, Italy, and Hungary occupied and annexed Slovenia (1941–1945), with a tiny area transferred to the Independent State of Croatia, a Nazi puppet state. In 1945 Slovenia became a founding member of the Federal People's Republic of Yugoslavia, renamed in 1963 as the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. In the first years after World War II this state was initially allied with the Eastern Bloc, but it never subscribed to the Warsaw Pact and in 1961 became one of the founders of the Non-Aligned Movement. In June 1991, after the introduction of multi-party representative democracy, Slovenia split from Yugoslavia and became an independent country. In 2004, it entered NATO and the European Union; in 2007 became the first formerly communist country to join the Eurozone; and in 2010 it joined the OECD, a global association of high-income developed countries.
7
Routes
2156.72
Kilometers
49.29
Hours
Show region map
Dolomieten Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Dolomieten", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
3
Routes
898.12
Kilometers
19.57
Hours
Show region map
Gardameer Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Gardameer", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
1
Routes
148.49
Kilometers
4.52
Hours
Show region map
Susa TU Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Susa TU", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Salvatore Postiglione (Naples, December 20, 1861 – Naples, November 28, 1906) was an Italian painter, mainly of portraits, and historic and genre subjects, in a Realist style.
1
Routes
148.49
Kilometers
4.52
Hours
Show region map
Sestriere Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Sestriere", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Sestriere (Occitan: Sestrieras, Piedmontese: Ël Sestrier, French: Sestrières) is an alpine village in Italy, a comune (municipality) of the Metropolitan City of Turin. It is situated in Val Susa, 17 km (11 mi) from the French border. Its name derives from Latin: ad petram sistrariam, that is at sixty Roman miles from Turin.
2
Routes
437.22
Kilometers
10.14
Hours
Show region map
Oulx Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Oulx", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Oulx (Vivaro-Alpine: Ors) is a comune (municipality) in the Metropolitan City of Turin in the Italian region Piedmont, located about 70 kilometres (43 mi) west of Turin, in the Susa Valley on the border with France.
1
Routes
148.49
Kilometers
4.52
Hours
Show region map
claviere Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "claviere", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Claviere is a municipality in the Metropolitan City of Turin in the Italian region of Piedmont, located about 80 kilometres (50 miles) west of the centre of Turin, near the border with France. Claviere is a small, but well equipped skiing village. The snow season lasts from December to April. The parish church has a Gothic-style portal.
2
Routes
437.22
Kilometers
10.14
Hours
Show region map
Cesana Torinese Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Cesana Torinese", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Cesana Torinese (French Césanne) is a comune (municipality) in the Metropolitan City of Turin in the Italian region Piedmont, located about 70 kilometres (43 mi) west of Turin, on the border with France.
1
Routes
148.49
Kilometers
4.52
Hours
Show region map
Bardonecchia Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Bardonecchia", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Bardonecchia (Template:IPA-ita) (French: Bardonèche or Bardonnèche French pronunciation: ​[baʁdoneʃ]; Occitan: Bardonecha Occitan pronunciation: [barduˈnetʃa]) is an Italian town and comune located in the Metropolitan City of Turin, in the Piedmont region, in the western part of Susa Valley. It grew out of a small village with the works for the Frejus Rail Tunnel, the first crossing the Alps. The town hosted the snowboarding events of the 2006 Winter Olympics.
1
Routes
148.49
Kilometers
4.52
Hours
Show region map
Suza to Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Suza to", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Suza Kumar is an Indian film actress who has appeared in Tamil language films. After making her debut in the Tamil film Ethir Neechal (2013), she has been seen in films including Veeram (2014)
1
Routes
148.49
Kilometers
4.52
Hours
Show region map
Suza TO Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Suza TO", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Suza Kumar is an Indian film actress who has appeared in Tamil language films. After making her debut in the Tamil film Ethir Neechal (2013), she has been seen in films including Veeram (2014)
2
Routes
437.22
Kilometers
10.14
Hours
Show region map
Chiomonte Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Chiomonte", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Chiomonte is a comune (municipality) in the Metropolitan City of Turin in the Italian region Piedmont, located about 60 kilometres (37 mi) west of Turin. The name of the town derives from the Latin Calcis Mons which refers to the calcium-rich soil of the area. Before the 8th century, Chiomonte was located on the south side of its present valley but, after a landslide, the town was moved to its present location. Chiomonte borders the following municipalities: Giaglione, Exilles, Gravere, and Usseaux. Sights include the 15th-century church of Santa Maria. Chiomonte is known for its ice wine and is one of the few areas in Italy producing this type of wine.
2
Routes
437.22
Kilometers
10.14
Hours
Show region map
Salbertrand Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Salbertrand", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Salbertrand is a comune (municipality) in the Metropolitan City of Turin in the Italian region Piedmont, about 60 km west of Turin. At 31 December 2004 it had a population of 522 and an area of 40.9 km².Salbertrand borders the following municipalities: Exilles, Oulx and Pragelato.
2
Routes
437.22
Kilometers
10.14
Hours
Show region map
Cesana Torinese Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Cesana Torinese", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Cesana Torinese (French Césanne) is a comune (municipality) in the Metropolitan City of Turin in the Italian region Piedmont, located about 70 kilometres (43 mi) west of Turin, on the border with France.
2
Routes
437.22
Kilometers
10.14
Hours
Show region map
Montgenevre Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Montgenevre", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Montgenèvre is a commune of the Hautes-Alpes department in southeastern France.
2
Routes
437.22
Kilometers
10.14
Hours
Show region map
Val des Pres Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Val des Pres", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Val-des-Prés is a commune in the Hautes-Alpes department in southeastern France. It is situated in the Clarée Valley.
1
Routes
148.49
Kilometers
4.52
Hours
Show region map
Nevache Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Nevache", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Névache (French pronunciation: ​[nevaʃ]; Occitan: Nevascha [neˈvastʃɔ, neˈvaːtsɔ]) is a commune in the Hautes-Alpes department in southeastern France.
1
Routes
148.49
Kilometers
4.52
Hours
Show region map
Usseaux Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Usseaux", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Usseaux is a comune (municipality) in the Metropolitan City of Turin in the Italian region Piedmont, located about 50 km west of Turin. Usseaux borders the following municipalities: Exilles, Chiomonte, Gravere, Meana di Susa, Pragelato, and Fenestrelle.
1
Routes
148.49
Kilometers
4.52
Hours
Show region map
Gravere Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Gravere", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Gravere is a comune (municipality) in the Metropolitan City of Turin in the Italian region Piedmont, located about 50 kilometres (31 mi) west of Turin. Until 1713, it was the first commune in the Val di Susa in the Duchy of Savoy when coming from France, as the upper part of the valley was part of the latter kingdom.
1
Routes
148.49
Kilometers
4.52
Hours
Show region map
Meana di Susa Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Meana di Susa", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Meana di Susa is a comune (municipality) in the Metropolitan City of Turin in the Italian region Piedmont, located about 50 km west of Turin. Meana di Susa borders the municipalities of Susa, Gravere, Mattie, Usseaux, and Fenestrelle. The village name is derived from its original Latin name of Mediana, signifying its location as the midpoint on the road from Paris to Rome. Each year on the Sunday closest to September 18, the village celebrates the feast of its patron saint, San Costanzo. The festival is centred on the parish church, Santa Maria Assunta. The festival also provides an opportunity for the community to honour the youth who are coming of age. Emigration: With limited prospects for employment in the Susa Valley, young men and women began to migrate away the village in the late 19th century. For some, the destination was Marseilles in France, given as the place of birth in several delayed birth registrations, and given as the last place of residence for some passengers entering the United States through Ellis Island. A few immigrants from Meana di Susa reached North America in the late 1890s, with a rather large number arriving between 1903 and 1914. Records from Ellis Island record approximately 400 passengers from Meana entering New York on their way to other destinations, although some were returning after a visit home. To a lesser extent, some immigrants entered North America through Canadian ports such as Quebec or Halifax, as well as some smaller U.S. ports. According to passenger records, their main destinations were the Gravenhurst/Bracebridge/Huntsville area of Ontario; Toronto, Ontario; Welland/Port Colborne area of Ontario; The Seattle/Renton area of Washington State; San Francisco, California; New York City; Mellen Wisconsin, and several towns in Western Pennsylvania. Most of the first passengers were adult males, typically in their 20s or 30s. Many had wives in Italy. Most were joining a friend or relative, although in some cases the “friend” may have simply been a contact. The friend usually had a surname typical to Meana or to the region. The passengers often travelled with someone else from Meana or one of the surrounding towns, notably Gravere. The draw to Washington State and to Pennsylvania was work in the coal mines. Those headed for Mellen Wisconsin and the Bracebridge/Huntsville area of north central Ontario were going to work in tanneries owned by the Shaw family, which actively recruited men in Meana and Gravere, first for the factory in Mellen and then for the Canadian faxtories. Several of those who went to the Ontario tanneries later relocated to Detroit, Toronto, and the Niagara Peninsula, notably Welland. Other tannery destinations included Acton Ontario, Munising Michigan, and Tomahawk Wisconsin. In his book Italians in Toronto, Development of a National Identity 1875 to 1935 John Zucchi states that those from this region who went to Toronto were primarily employed in the catering and restaurant trades. Zuchhi in his book observed: A peasant in Meana or Gravere near Susa in 1910 realized sooner or later that working in a tannery in Acton or Bracebridge, Ontario or as a chef or waiter in Toronto was more remunerative than collecting chestnuts or fruit for export to France. One result of emigration was a sharp drop in the birth rate. The civil records for Meana list 80 births in 1902, eight years later only 37 were born.
2
Routes
437.22
Kilometers
10.14
Hours
Show region map
Exilles Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Exilles", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Exilles (Occitan: Exilhas, local Occitan: Isiya, Piedmontese: Isiles, Latin: Scingomagus, Italianization under Italian Fascism: Esille) is a comune (municipality) in the Metropolitan City of Turin in the Italian region Piedmont, located about 60 kilometres (37 mi) west of Turin, on the border with France. It is the location of the Exilles Fort, an alpine fortification which guarded the route between the Kingdom of France and the Duchy of Savoy. Exilles borders the following municipalities: Bardonecchia, Bramans (France), Chiomonte, Giaglione, Oulx, Pragelato, Salbertrand, and Usseaux.
1
Routes
148.49
Kilometers
4.52
Hours
Show region map
Pragelato Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Pragelato", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Pragelato (also Pragelà; Vivaro-Alpine: Prajalats) is a comune (municipality) in the Metropolitan City of Turin in the Italian region Piedmont, located about 60 kilometres (37 mi) west of Turin, in the upper Val Chisone. The name Pragelato, meaning "icy meadow", has been derived from the harsh climate and the fact that the ground is covered with ice for long periods. On both sides of the Chisone, extensive forests of pine and larch provide protection from the avalanches which are a common occurrence in the winter season: for this reason in the nineteenth century the people of Pragelato were only permitted to fell trees close to the mountain summits, and even then only with the permission of the communal administration.Pragelato borders the following municipalities: Exilles, Oulx, Salbertrand, Usseaux, Fenestrelle, Sauze d'Oulx, Massello, Sestriere, Sauze di Cesana, Salza di Pinerolo, Prali.
2
Routes
437.22
Kilometers
10.14
Hours
Show region map
TO Italien Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "TO Italien", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Comédie-Italienne or Théâtre-Italien are French names which have been used to refer to Italian-language theatre and opera when performed in France. The earliest recorded visits by Italian players were commedia dell'arte companies employed by the French court under the Italian-born queens Catherine de Medici and Marie de Medici. These troupes also gave public performances in Paris at the theatre of the Hôtel de Bourgogne, probably the earliest public theatre to be built in France. The first official use of the name Comédie-Italienne was in 1680, when it was given to the commedia dell'arte troupe at the Hôtel de Bourgogne, to distinguish it from the French troupe, the Comédie-Française, which was founded that year, and just as the name Théâtre-Français was commonly applied to the latter, Théâtre-Italien was used for the Italians. Over time French phrases, songs, whole scenes, and eventually entire plays were incorporated into the Comédie-Italienne's performances. By 1762 the company was merged with the Opéra-Comique, but the names Comédie-Italienne and Théâtre-Italien continued to be used, even though the repertory soon became almost exclusively French opéra-comique. The names were dropped completely in 1801, when the company was merged with the Théâtre Feydeau. From 1801 to 1878, Théâtre-Italien was used for a succession of Parisian opera companies performing Italian opera in Italian. In 1980 the name La Comédie-Italienne was used for a theatre in the Montparnasse district of Paris, which presents Italian commedia dell'arte plays in French translation.
2
Routes
437.22
Kilometers
10.14
Hours
Show region map
Piemont Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Piemont", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Piedmont ( PEED-mont; Italian: Piemonte, pronounced [pjeˈmonte]; Piedmontese, Occitan and Arpitan: Piemont, Piedmontese pronunciation: [pjeˈmʊŋt]) is a region in northwest Italy, one of the 20 regions of the country. It borders the Liguria region to the south, the Lombardy and Emilia-Romagna regions to the east and the Aosta Valley region to the northwest; it also borders France to the west and Switzerland to the northeast. It has an area of 25,402 square kilometres (9,808 sq mi) and a population of 4 377 941 as of 30 November 2017. The capital of Piedmont is Turin.
1
Routes
393.05
Kilometers
7.22
Hours
Show region map
Zuid Tirol Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Zuid Tirol", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Below is list of Dutch language exonyms for places in non-Dutch-speaking areas of Europe
10
Routes
2185.27
Kilometers
52.33
Hours
Show region map
Dolomieten Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Dolomieten", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
1
Routes
393.05
Kilometers
7.22
Hours
Show region map
Zuid Tirol Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Zuid Tirol", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Below is list of Dutch language exonyms for places in non-Dutch-speaking areas of Europe
14
Routes
3399.76
Kilometers
77.92
Hours
Show region map
Zuid Tirol Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Zuid Tirol", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Below is list of Dutch language exonyms for places in non-Dutch-speaking areas of Europe
14
Routes
3399.76
Kilometers
77.92
Hours
Show region map
Alto Adige Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Alto Adige", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
South Tyrol is an autonomous province in northern Italy. It is one of the two autonomous provinces that make up the autonomous region of Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol. Its official trilingual denomination is Autonome Provinz Bozen – Südtirol in German, Provincia autonoma di Bolzano – Alto Adige in Italian and Provinzia autonoma de Bulsan – Südtirol in Ladin, reflecting the three main language groups to which its population belongs. The province is the northernmost of Italy, the second largest, with an area of 7,400 square kilometres (2,857 sq mi) and has a total population of 530,009 inhabitants as of 2018. Its capital and largest city is Bolzano (German: Bozen; Ladin: Balsan or Bulsan). According to 2014 data based on the 2011 census, 62.3% of the population speaks German (Standard German in the written form and an Austro-Bavarian dialect in the spoken form); 23.4% of the population speaks Italian, mainly in and around the two largest cities (Bolzano and Merano); 4.1% speaks Ladin, a Rhaeto-Romance language; 10.2% of the population (mainly recent immigrants) speaks another language as first language. The province is granted a considerable level of self-government, consisting of a large range of exclusive legislative and executive powers and a fiscal regime that allows it to retain a large part of most levied taxes, while remaining a net contributor to the national budget. As of 2016, South Tyrol is the wealthiest province in Italy and among the wealthiest in the European Union. In the wider context of the European Union, the province is one of the three members of the Euroregion of Tyrol-South Tyrol-Trentino, which corresponds almost exactly to the historical region of Tyrol. The other members are Tyrol state in Austria, to the north and east, and the Italian Autonomous province of Trento to the South.
16
Routes
3904.83
Kilometers
90.28
Hours
Show region map
Trentino Sudtirol Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Trentino Sudtirol", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol (Italian: Trentino-Alto Adige, pronounced [trenˈtiːno ˈalto ˈaːdidʒe]; German: Trentino-Südtirol; Ladin: Trentin-Südtirol) is an autonomous region in Northern Italy. Since the 1970s, most legislative and administrative powers have been transferred to the two self-governing provinces that make up the region: the Province of Trento, commonly known as Trentino, and the Province of Bolzano, commonly known as South Tyrol. From the 9th century until its annexation by Italy in 1919, the region was part of Austria-Hungary and its predecessors, the Austrian Empire and the Holy Roman Empire. Together with the Austrian state of Tyrol it is represented by the Euroregion Tyrol-South Tyrol-Trentino. With a past of poverty, the region is today among the wealthiest and most developed in both Italy and the whole European Union. In English, the region is also known as Trentino-South Tyrol or by its Italian name.
1
Routes
288.72
Kilometers
5.62
Hours
Show region map
Saint etienne de tinee Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Saint etienne de tinee", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Saint-Étienne-de-Tinée (Italian: Santo Stefano di Tinea) is a commune in the Alpes-Maritimes department in southeastern France. It was part of the historic County of Nice until 1860. The ski resort of Auron is located on the territory of the commune, and linked to the village of Saint-Étienne-de-Tinée directly by a gondola lift.
2
Routes
602.49
Kilometers
11.27
Hours
Show region map
Tirol Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Tirol", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Tyrol (; historically the Tyrole; German: Tirol [tiˈʁoːl] (listen); Italian: Tirolo) is a historical region in the Alps; in northern Italy and western Austria. The area was to Habsburg times the former County of Tyrol. The Treaty of Saint-Germain-en-Laye in 1919 divided the area into two parts: State of Tyrol; formed by North and East Tyrol, it belongs to the Republic of Austria Region of Trentino-South Tyrol; at that time still with Souramont (Cortina d'Ampezzo, Livinallongo del Col di Lana and Colle Santa Lucia) and the municipalities Valvestino, Magasa and Pedemonte, belonged to the Kingdom of Italy, since 1946 the Italian Republic.With the founding of the European region Tyrol-South Tyrol-Trentino the area has its own legal entity since 2011 in the form of a European Grouping for Territorial Cooperation.
2
Routes
437.22
Kilometers
10.14
Hours
Show region map
provence Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "provence", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Provence (, US: ; French: [pʁɔvɑ̃s]; Provençal: Provença in classical norm or Prouvènço in Mistralian norm, pronounced [pʀuˈvɛnsɔ]) is a geographical region and historical province of southeastern France, which extends from the left bank of the lower Rhône River to the west to the Italian border to the east, and is bordered by the Mediterranean Sea to the south. It largely corresponds with the modern administrative région of Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, and includes the départements of Var, Bouches-du-Rhône, Alpes-de-Haute-Provence and parts of Alpes-Maritimes and Vaucluse. The largest city of the region is Marseille. The Romans made the region the first Roman province beyond the Alps and called it Provincia Romana, which evolved into the present name. Until 1481 it was ruled by the Counts of Provence from their capital in Aix-en-Provence, then became a province of the Kings of France. While it has been part of France for more than five hundred years, it still retains a distinct cultural and linguistic identity, particularly in the interior of the region.
3
Routes
1155.86
Kilometers
22.38
Hours
Show region map
karinthie Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "karinthie", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Otto III (c. 1265 – 25 May 1310), a member of the House of Gorizia (Meinhardiner dynasty), was Duke of Carinthia and Count of Tyrol from 1295 until his death. He ruled jointly with his younger brothers Louis and Henry VI.
14
Routes
3992.92
Kilometers
86.65
Hours
Show region map
VENETO Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "VENETO", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Veneto ( or ; Italian: Veneto [ˈvɛːneto]; Venetian: Vèneto [ˈvɛneto]) is one of the 20 regions of Italy. Its population is about five million, ranking fifth in Italy. The region's capital and most populous city is Venice. Veneto was part of the Roman Empire until the 5th century AD. Later, after a feudal period, it was part of the Republic of Venice until 1797. Venice ruled for centuries over one of the largest and richest maritime republics and trade empires in the world. After the Napoleonic Wars and the Congress of Vienna, the Republic was annexed by the Austrian Empire, until it was merged with the Kingdom of Italy in 1866, as a result of the Third Italian War of Independence. Besides Italian, most inhabitants also speak Venetian, which is divided into five varieties. Since 1971 the Statute of Veneto has referred to the region's citizens as "the Venetian people". Article 1 defines Veneto as an "autonomous Region", "constituted by the Venetian people and the lands of the provinces of Belluno, Padua, Rovigo, Treviso, Venice, Verona and Vicenza", while maintaining "bonds with Venetians in the world". Article 2 sets forth the principle of the "self-government of the Venetian people" and mandates the Region to "promote the historical identity of the Venetian people and civilisation". Despite this affirmations, approved by the Italian Parliament, Veneto is not among the autonomous regions with special statute, differently from its north-eastern and north-western neighbours, Friuli-Venezia Giulia and Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol respectively. Veneto is home to a notable nationalist movement, known as Venetian nationalism or Venetism. The region's largest party is the Liga Veneta, a founding component of the Lega Nord. The current President of Veneto is Luca Zaia (Liga Veneta–Lega Nord), re-elected in 2015 with 50.1% of the vote. Zaia II Government includes also Forza Italia and is externally supported by Independence We Veneto and the Brothers of Italy. An autonomy referendum took place in 2017: 57.2% of Venetians turned out, 98.1% voting "yes" to "further forms and special conditions of autonomy". Having been for a long period in history a land of mass emigration, Veneto is today one of the greatest immigrant-receiving regions in the country, with 487,493 foreigners (9.9% of the regional population; January 2018), notably including Romanians (25.2%), Moroccans (9.3%), Chinese (7.1%), Moldovans (7.0%) and Albanians (6.9%).
14
Routes
3992.92
Kilometers
86.65
Hours
Show region map
VENETO Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "VENETO", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Veneto ( or ; Italian: Veneto [ˈvɛːneto]; Venetian: Vèneto [ˈvɛneto]) is one of the 20 regions of Italy. Its population is about five million, ranking fifth in Italy. The region's capital and most populous city is Venice. Veneto was part of the Roman Empire until the 5th century AD. Later, after a feudal period, it was part of the Republic of Venice until 1797. Venice ruled for centuries over one of the largest and richest maritime republics and trade empires in the world. After the Napoleonic Wars and the Congress of Vienna, the Republic was annexed by the Austrian Empire, until it was merged with the Kingdom of Italy in 1866, as a result of the Third Italian War of Independence. Besides Italian, most inhabitants also speak Venetian, which is divided into five varieties. Since 1971 the Statute of Veneto has referred to the region's citizens as "the Venetian people". Article 1 defines Veneto as an "autonomous Region", "constituted by the Venetian people and the lands of the provinces of Belluno, Padua, Rovigo, Treviso, Venice, Verona and Vicenza", while maintaining "bonds with Venetians in the world". Article 2 sets forth the principle of the "self-government of the Venetian people" and mandates the Region to "promote the historical identity of the Venetian people and civilisation". Despite this affirmations, approved by the Italian Parliament, Veneto is not among the autonomous regions with special statute, differently from its north-eastern and north-western neighbours, Friuli-Venezia Giulia and Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol respectively. Veneto is home to a notable nationalist movement, known as Venetian nationalism or Venetism. The region's largest party is the Liga Veneta, a founding component of the Lega Nord. The current President of Veneto is Luca Zaia (Liga Veneta–Lega Nord), re-elected in 2015 with 50.1% of the vote. Zaia II Government includes also Forza Italia and is externally supported by Independence We Veneto and the Brothers of Italy. An autonomy referendum took place in 2017: 57.2% of Venetians turned out, 98.1% voting "yes" to "further forms and special conditions of autonomy". Having been for a long period in history a land of mass emigration, Veneto is today one of the greatest immigrant-receiving regions in the country, with 487,493 foreigners (9.9% of the regional population; January 2018), notably including Romanians (25.2%), Moroccans (9.3%), Chinese (7.1%), Moldovans (7.0%) and Albanians (6.9%).
14
Routes
3992.92
Kilometers
86.65
Hours
Show region map
VENETO Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "VENETO", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Veneto ( or ; Italian: Veneto [ˈvɛːneto]; Venetian: Vèneto [ˈvɛneto]) is one of the 20 regions of Italy. Its population is about five million, ranking fifth in Italy. The region's capital and most populous city is Venice. Veneto was part of the Roman Empire until the 5th century AD. Later, after a feudal period, it was part of the Republic of Venice until 1797. Venice ruled for centuries over one of the largest and richest maritime republics and trade empires in the world. After the Napoleonic Wars and the Congress of Vienna, the Republic was annexed by the Austrian Empire, until it was merged with the Kingdom of Italy in 1866, as a result of the Third Italian War of Independence. Besides Italian, most inhabitants also speak Venetian, which is divided into five varieties. Since 1971 the Statute of Veneto has referred to the region's citizens as "the Venetian people". Article 1 defines Veneto as an "autonomous Region", "constituted by the Venetian people and the lands of the provinces of Belluno, Padua, Rovigo, Treviso, Venice, Verona and Vicenza", while maintaining "bonds with Venetians in the world". Article 2 sets forth the principle of the "self-government of the Venetian people" and mandates the Region to "promote the historical identity of the Venetian people and civilisation". Despite this affirmations, approved by the Italian Parliament, Veneto is not among the autonomous regions with special statute, differently from its north-eastern and north-western neighbours, Friuli-Venezia Giulia and Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol respectively. Veneto is home to a notable nationalist movement, known as Venetian nationalism or Venetism. The region's largest party is the Liga Veneta, a founding component of the Lega Nord. The current President of Veneto is Luca Zaia (Liga Veneta–Lega Nord), re-elected in 2015 with 50.1% of the vote. Zaia II Government includes also Forza Italia and is externally supported by Independence We Veneto and the Brothers of Italy. An autonomy referendum took place in 2017: 57.2% of Venetians turned out, 98.1% voting "yes" to "further forms and special conditions of autonomy". Having been for a long period in history a land of mass emigration, Veneto is today one of the greatest immigrant-receiving regions in the country, with 487,493 foreigners (9.9% of the regional population; January 2018), notably including Romanians (25.2%), Moroccans (9.3%), Chinese (7.1%), Moldovans (7.0%) and Albanians (6.9%).
6
Routes
2375.49
Kilometers
46.14
Hours
Show region map
FRIULI VENEZIA GIULIA Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "FRIULI VENEZIA GIULIA", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Friuli–Venezia Giulia (pronounced [friˈuːli veˈnɛttsja ˈdʒuːlja]) is one of the 20 regions of Italy, and one of five autonomous regions with special statute. The regional capital is Trieste. The city of Venice (Venezia) is not in this region, despite the name. Friuli–Venezia Giulia has an area of 7,924 km2 and about 1.2 million inhabitants. A natural opening to the sea for many Central European countries, the region is traversed by the major transport routes between the east and west of southern Europe. It encompasses the historical-geographical region of Friuli and a small portion of the historical region of Venezia Giulia – also known in English as the Julian March – each with its own distinct history, traditions and identity.
5
Routes
2069.32
Kilometers
39.17
Hours
Show region map
SLOVENIA Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "SLOVENIA", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Slovenia ( (listen) sloh-VEE-nee-ə; Slovene: Slovenija [slɔˈʋèːnija]), officially the Republic of Slovenia (Slovene: Republika Slovenija , abbr.: RS), is a sovereign state located in southern Central Europe at a crossroads of important European cultural and trade routes. It is bordered by Italy to the west, Austria to the north, Hungary to the northeast, Croatia to the southeast, and the Adriatic Sea to the southwest. It covers 20,273 square kilometers (7,827 sq mi) and has a population of 2.07 million. One of the successor states of the former Yugoslavia, Slovenia is a parliamentary republic and a member of the United Nations, of the European Union, and of NATO. The capital and largest city is Ljubljana.Slovenia has a mostly mountainous terrain with a mainly continental climate, with the exception of the Slovene Littoral, which has a sub-Mediterranean climate, and of the northwest, which has an Alpine climate. Additionally, the Dinaric Alps and the Pannonian Plain meet on the territory of Slovenia. The country, marked by a significant biological diversity, is one of the most water-rich in Europe, with a dense river network, a rich aquifer system, and significant karst underground watercourses. Over half of the territory is covered by forest. The human settlement of Slovenia is dispersed and uneven.Slovenia has historically been the crossroads of Slavic, Germanic, and Romance languages and cultures. Although the population is not homogeneous, Slovenes comprise the majority. The South Slavic language Slovene is the official language throughout the country. Slovenia is a largely secularized country, but Catholicism and Lutheranism have significantly influenced its culture and identity. The economy of Slovenia is small, open and export-oriented and has been strongly influenced by international conditions. It has been severely hurt by the Eurozone crisis which started in 2009. The main economic field is services, followed by industry and construction.Historically, the current territory of Slovenia has formed part of many different states, including the Roman Empire, Byzantine Empire, Carolingian Empire and the Holy Roman Empire, the Habsburg Monarchy, the Republic of Venice, the French-administered Illyrian Provinces of Napoleon I, the Austrian Empire and Austria-Hungary. In October 1918 the Slovenes exercised self-determination for the first time by co-founding the State of Slovenes, Croats and Serbs. In December 1918 they merged with the Kingdom of Serbia into the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes (renamed Kingdom of Yugoslavia in 1929). During World War II (1939–1945) Germany, Italy, and Hungary occupied and annexed Slovenia (1941–1945), with a tiny area transferred to the Independent State of Croatia, a Nazi puppet state. In 1945 Slovenia became a founding member of the Federal People's Republic of Yugoslavia, renamed in 1963 as the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. In the first years after World War II this state was initially allied with the Eastern Bloc, but it never subscribed to the Warsaw Pact and in 1961 became one of the founders of the Non-Aligned Movement. In June 1991, after the introduction of multi-party representative democracy, Slovenia split from Yugoslavia and became an independent country. In 2004, it entered NATO and the European Union; in 2007 became the first formerly communist country to join the Eurozone; and in 2010 it joined the OECD, a global association of high-income developed countries.
5
Routes
1758.35
Kilometers
33.65
Hours
Show region map
AUSTRIA Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "AUSTRIA", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Austria ( (listen), ; German: Österreich [ˈøːstɐraɪç] (listen)), officially the Republic of Austria (German: Republik Österreich, listen ), is a country of nearly 9 million people in Central Europe. It is bordered by the Czech Republic and Germany to the north, Hungary and Slovakia to the east, Slovenia and Italy to the south, and Switzerland and Liechtenstein to the west. The territory of Austria covers 83,879 km2 (32,386 sq mi). The terrain is highly mountainous, lying within the Alps; only 32% of the country is below 500 m (1,640 ft), and its highest point is 3,798 m (12,461 ft). The majority of the population speaks local Bavarian dialects as their native language, and German in its standard form is the country's official language. Other local official languages are Hungarian, Burgenland Croatian, and Slovene.Austria is a federal republic with a parliamentary representative democracy comprising nine federated states. The capital and largest city, with a population exceeding 1.8 million, is Vienna. Other major urban areas of Austria include Graz, Linz, Salzburg and Innsbruck. Austria is consistently ranked as one of the richest countries in the world by per capita GDP terms. The country has developed a high standard of living and in 2018 was ranked 20th in the world for its Human Development Index. The republic declared its perpetual neutrality in foreign political affairs in 1955. Austria has been a member of the United Nations since 1955, joined the European Union in 1995, and is a founder of the OECD. Austria also signed the Schengen Agreement in 1995, and adopted the euro currency in 1999.
1
Routes
288.72
Kilometers
5.62
Hours
Show region map
Seealpen Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Seealpen", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
The Gorges de Daluis is a six-kilometer-long canyon formed by the river Var in the Alpes-Maritimes department in southeastern France. It runs south from Guillaumes to Daluis.
1
Routes
288.72
Kilometers
5.62
Hours
Show region map
Alpes de Haute Provence Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Alpes de Haute Provence", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Alpes-de-Haute-Provence (French pronunciation: ​[alp.də.ot.pʁɔ.vɑ̃s]; "Alps of Upper Provence"; Occitan: Aups d'Auta Provença) is a department in the Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur region in Southeastern France. Formerly part of the province of Provence, it had a population of 161,916 in 2013. Its main cities are Digne-les-Bains (prefecture), Manosque, Sisteron, Barcelonnette, Castellane and Forcalquier. Inhabitants of Alpes-de-Haute-Provence are called the Bas-Alpins or Bas-Alpines referring to the department of Basses-Alpes which was the former name of the department until 1970.
3
Routes
898.12
Kilometers
19.57
Hours
Show region map
Gardameer Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Gardameer", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
1
Routes
288.72
Kilometers
5.62
Hours
Show region map
Auvergne Rhone Alpes Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Auvergne Rhone Alpes", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes or ARA (French pronunciation: [ovɛʁɲ ʁon alp] (listen), Arpitan: Ôvèrgne-Rôno-Ârpes, Occitan: Auvèrnhe Ròse Aups, Italian: Alvernia-Rodano-Alpi) is a region of France created by the territorial reform of French Regions in 2014; it resulted from the merger of Auvergne and Rhône-Alpes. The new region came into effect on 1 January 2016, after the regional elections in December 2015.The region covers an area of more than 69,711 km2 (26,916 sq mi), making it the third largest in metropolitan France, with a population of 7,695,264, second only to Île-de-France.
1
Routes
187.02
Kilometers
3.92
Hours
Show region map
Sardinien Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Sardinien", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Innsbruck Airport (IATA: INN, ICAO: LOWI), also known locally as Kranebitten Airport, is the largest international airport in Tyrol in western Austria. It is located approximately 2.5 miles from the centre of Innsbruck. The airport, which was opened in 1925, handles regional flights around the Alps, as well as seasonal international traffic to further European destinations. During the winter, activity increases significantly, due to the high number of skiers travelling to the region.
1
Routes
187.02
Kilometers
3.92
Hours
Show region map
Tortoli Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Tortoli", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Tortolì listen (Sardinian: Tortolì o Tortuelie, Latin: Portus Ilii) is a town and comune in Sardinia, in the Province of Nuoro.
1
Routes
209.44
Kilometers
4.05
Hours
Show region map
Nauders Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Nauders", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Nauders (Romansh: Danuder) is a municipality in the district of Landeck in the Austrian state of Tyrol.
1
Routes
209.44
Kilometers
4.05
Hours
Show region map
Livigno Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Livigno", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Livigno (Italian: [liˈviɲɲo]; local Lombard: Livígn [liˈʋiɲ]; German: Luwin) is a town and comune in the province of Sondrio, in the region of Lombardy, Italy, located in the Italian Alps, near the Swiss border.
1
Routes
209.44
Kilometers
4.05
Hours
Show region map
Stelvio Open region
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About this region
The Alfa Romeo Stelvio (Tipo 949) is a front engine, all wheel drive, five door compact luxury crossover SUV manufactured and marketed by the Alfa Romeo subdivision of FCA since debuting at 2016 Los Angeles Auto Show and entering production at the Cassino Plant at the end of 2016. It is current top Alfa sales with about 43,000 samples per year (2018). Sharing the platform of the mid size Giulia sedan, the Stelvio uses FCA's Giorgio platform, ultimately to be shared with Maserati, Dodge and Jeep. The name Stelvio derives from the Stelvio Pass, Italy's highest mountain pass, noted for its 48 circuitous switchbacks.
1
Routes
209.44
Kilometers
4.05
Hours
Show region map
Bormio Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Bormio", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Bormio (Lombard: Bormi, Romansh: Buorm , German: Worms im Veltlintal) is a town and comune with a population of about 4,100 located in the Province of Sondrio, Lombardy region of the Alps in northern Italy. The centre of the upper Valtellina valley, it is a popular winter sports resort. It was the site of the Alpine World Ski Championships in 1985 and 2005, and annually hosts the Alpine Ski World Cup. In addition to modern skiing facilities, the town is noted for the presence of several hot springs that have been tapped to provide water to three thermal baths.
1
Routes
209.44
Kilometers
4.05
Hours
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Graun Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Graun", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Graun may refer to: Graun im Vinschgau (Curon Venosta), a municipality in Italy Carl Heinrich Graun (1704–1759), a German composer Johann Gottlieb Graun (1703–1771), a German composer and violinist The Guardian, a UK newspaper
1
Routes
288.72
Kilometers
5.62
Hours
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Alpes de Haute Provence Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Alpes de Haute Provence", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Alpes-de-Haute-Provence (French pronunciation: ​[alp.də.ot.pʁɔ.vɑ̃s]; "Alps of Upper Provence"; Occitan: Aups d'Auta Provença) is a department in the Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur region in Southeastern France. Formerly part of the province of Provence, it had a population of 161,916 in 2013. Its main cities are Digne-les-Bains (prefecture), Manosque, Sisteron, Barcelonnette, Castellane and Forcalquier. Inhabitants of Alpes-de-Haute-Provence are called the Bas-Alpins or Bas-Alpines referring to the department of Basses-Alpes which was the former name of the department until 1970.
Passo Rest
27-01-2019
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Zuid Tirol Dolomieten Valparola Falzarego Pordoi Sella Wurzjoch
27-08-2016
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Col du Mont Cenis Col de la Bonette en Col de L Iseran
28-06-2016
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I Tenna Hoge Dolomieten en Passo di Manghen
13-10-2017
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Zuid Tirol Dolomieten Campolongo Pordoi Sella Karer Sella Gardena
27-08-2016
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Zuid Tirol Dolomieten Campolongo Falzarego Giau Fedaia Pordoi Campolongo
27-08-2016
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Zuid Tirol Dolomieten Herz der Dolomiten 11 passen in 219 km
27-08-2016
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I Tenna Monte Baldo Gardameer
25-01-2019
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Zuid Tirol Dolomieten Campolongo Pordoi SanPellegrino Marmolada Fedaia Sella Gardena
27-08-2016
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Nauders Livigno Stelvio
16-02-2019
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