Lustrafjord Geirangerfjord Norddalsfjord Trollstigen Noorwegen
Trollstigen
Well, I do not have much to add to the directions above ...
This is one of the most beautiful routes you can drive in Europe. I drove it as part of a 7 day Scandinavian trip, much too short ... Advice is not to drive this route in one day, but in 2 days. Then you have the time to reflect on the most beautiful things nature has to offer, but also to drive Trollstigen for example 3 times. First down, then up and then down again to continue your route. The route has been checked and created for TomTom, Garmin and MyRoute-app Navigation. The green waypoints are places where you really have to stop for a photo. This route is free and without the registration of MyRoute-app, click on the button 'Use route' and then 'Save as'. Do you want to edit the route? No problem, registering is also free and you can also choose to try the all-in-one subscription for free for 2 weeks!

Read here the entire travel story of the Scandinavia trip including the preparations: https://www.myrouteapp.com/en/social/blog/143?mode=share
Op weg naar Geiranger
Geiranger
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Disclaimer:

Using this GPS route is for your own account and risk. The route has been compiled with care and checked by a MyRoute-app accredited RouteXpert for use on both TomTom, Garmin and MyRoute-app Navigation. Due to changed circumstances, road diversions or seasonal closures there may be changes, so we recommend checking every route before use. Preferably use the routetrack in your navigation system. For more information about the use of MyRoute-app, please visit the website at 'Community 'or' Webinars'.

Waypoint, used to construct the route
Sight, here you can see something
Viewpoint, a short stop for taking a picture
Stopping point, for hotel, lunch, etc
Attention, see the text in the waypoint for more information

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Michel van Hagen (MRA-Founder)
Hedmark
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Hedmark", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Hedmark ([ˈhêːdmɑrk] (listen)) was a county in Norway before 1 January 2020, bordering Trøndelag to the north, Oppland to the west and Akershus to the south. The county administration is in Hamar. Hedmark and Oppland counties were merged into Innlandet county on 1 January 2020, when Norway's former 19 counties became 10 bigger counties / regions Hedmark made up the northeastern part of Østlandet, the southeastern part of the country. It had a long border with Sweden to the east (Dalarna County and Värmland County). The largest lakes were Femunden and Mjøsa, the largest lake in Norway. Parts of Glomma, Norway's longest river, flowed through Hedmark. Geographically, Hedmark was traditionally divided into: Hedemarken (east of the lake Mjøsa), Østerdalen ("East Valley" north of the town Elverum), and Solør / Glåmdalen (south of Elverum) and Odal in the very south. Hedmark and Oppland were the only Norwegian counties with no coastline. Hedmark also hosted some events of the 1994 Winter Olympic Games. Hamar, Kongsvinger, Elverum and Tynset were cities in the county. Hedmark was one of the less urbanized areas in Norway; about half of the inhabitants lived on rural land. The population was mainly concentrated in the rich agricultural district adjoining Mjøsa to the southeast. The county's extensive forests supplied much of Norway's timber; at one time, logs were floated down Glomma to the coast but are now transported by truck and train. The Hedmark municipality of Engerdal had the distinction of marking the current southernmost border in Norway of Sápmi, the traditional region of the Sami people. The county was divided into three traditional districts. Those were Hedmarken, Østerdalen and Solør (with Odalen and Vinger). Hedmark was originally a part of the large Akershus amt, but in 1757 Oplandenes amt was separated from it. Some years later, in 1781, this was divided into Kristians amt (now Oppland) and Hedemarkens amt. Until 1919, the county was called Hedemarkens amt.
5948
Amount of visits (Hedmark)
5
Amount of routes verified by RouteXperts (Hedmark)
78
Amount of downloaded routes (Hedmark)