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The prettiest verified routes in Norway

 
MyRoute-app helps you with planning your dream journey! All routes on the page have been verified by our RouteXperts. De routes are categorized in regions, when you click on 'view region' you will see all verified routes for that region that are free to use.
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43
Amount of active RouteXperts (worldwide)
1461
Amount of routes reviewed by RouteXperts (worldwide)
70684
Amount of downloaded routes (worldwide)
19696
Amount of visits (Norway)
51
Amount of routes verified by RouteXperts (Norway)
790
Amount of downloaded routes (Norway)
Route collections
The route collections by MyRoute-app are collections of multiple routes that belong to each other and checked by MRA RouteXperts. All routes are identical for TomTom, Garmin and MyRoute-app Navigation.
10
Routes
2727.68
Kilometers
78.73
Hours
View route collection The 10 most downloaded routes in Norway from RouteXpert Hans van de Ven
About this route collection
Hello and welcome to this collection of the Top 10 MyRoute app downloaded routes in Norway.

There will be a great new event to be announced soon, where all these routes can be driven.
Download them all now and place them in a new "Top 10" folder, so that you always have them at hand.

If you are going to drive one of these routes in the meantime, track them with the MRA Mobile App or with MRA Navigation. Take some photos (moments) along the way as these will come in handy.
Create a travelogue of your Top 10 driven routes and add the recorded track to it.

There will also be some great prizes on offer, so keep an eye on the MRA-RouteXperts page and your mail.

The 10 routes are:
1. Lysefjord
2. Geirangerfjord
3. Sognefjord
4. R07 Round trip Hjelledalen
5. R05 Trysil Savalen
6. Naeroyfjord
7. R10 Byrkjedal Austbo
8. Hardangerfjord
9. R11 Austbo Asgardstrand
10.R09 Norheimsund Byrkjedal
26
Routes
7116.19
Kilometers
200.45
Hours
View route collection 6500 kilometers through Scandinavia with the Lofoten and the North Cape as highlights
About this route collection
The Arctic Challenge Tour, on which this 26-part tour is partly based, is not a speed competition. It's a tour. It comes down to agility, good navigation and anticipation. The participants are obliged to adhere to the speed limit of the country concerned. Participants must find the ideal route with the shortest possible distance by adhering 100% to local traffic regulations. Of course, also take maximum speeds into account. The organization checks for speed limit violations. In the event of gross or repeated exceeding of the maximum speed, disqualification will follow for the relevant stage and for the final classification. The route and speeds driven are checked by means of a track and trace system. This equipment is built into every vehicle. Each team can then be followed accurately in the Back Office. Those who stay at home, interested parties and participants can also see the performance of the teams, because you can be followed live via the Internet. The Back office takes action when a team gets into trouble. (source: The Arctic Challenge website)

That's quite a luxury, having a back office behind you that keeps an eye on you. Most of us will not have that and are dependent on ourselves or the fellow traveler (s). The only agreement you have with the participants is that you must also adhere to the rules. Fortunately, like the participants, you don't have to complete this tour in 9 days, but you can take a little longer.

The highlight of the Arctic Challenge in 2020 was the Lofoten, an archipelago northwest of Norway. The Lofoten archipelago lies in the middle of the wild Norwegian Sea, well above the Arctic Circle. This special region offers a beautiful landscape with imposing mountains, deep fjords and long, wild sandy beaches where the sound of the seabird colonies can always be heard.
The archipelago is best known for its rich fishing tradition. Despite their isolated location, the Lofoten still make a prosperous impression. The whole economy is above all about fishing. The image of the Lofoten is mainly dominated by wooden racks with cod hanging to dry. The Lofoten fishery has been a household name for centuries. In the middle of winter, the ships set sail to catch the fish in just a few months. The rich fishing grounds are due to the North Atlantic Gulf Stream around the islands, where the fish have their spawning grounds. No oil drilling is allowed around Lofoten and the cod spawning grounds there.

The next destination for the participants was Sirkka, also known as Levi, a winter sports resort in Finnish Lapland. They stayed there for a few days to go ice-karting and enjoy the snow by making a trip with a snowmobile or skiing. This tour also takes you to Sirkka, but instead of staying there for a few days, you have the option to continue to the North Cape, the second highlight of this trip.

Imagine a place in the far north, where the Atlantic Ocean meets the icy waters of the Arctic Ocean. This place is the North Cape in Western Finnmark in Northern Norway. From here only the Spitsbergen archipelago lies between you and the North Pole and the sun shines for 2.5 months at a time; from mid-May to the end of July. Many visitors admire the midnight sun or the sunset over the Barents Sea from the North Cape Plateau.

For each route you will find a review with a description of the route, what you will pass by and what to see along the way. It also briefly describes how the participants in the Arctic Challenge in 2020 had to ride it, from which point to which point. Markers (waypoints) have been included along the way that indicate the end points of the stages that the participants had to complete. As mentioned, they covered the distance in 9 days, stages of more than 1000 kilometers were no exception.

Each route ends at a hotel. It is of course not an obligation to use these hotels, you can always look for another place to stay in the area, that decision is yours. However, my experience is that they are all simple but good hotels for a very reasonable price. They are known and can be booked at booking.com.

The routes of these collections:

R01 - Puttgarden to Angelholm, 280km
R02 - Angelholm to Alingsas, 281km
R03 - Alingsas to Mysen, 261km
R04 - Mysen to Rena, 312km
R05 - Rena to Orkanger, 306km
R06 - Orkanger to Grong, 292km
R07 - Grong to Mo i Rana, 290km
R08 - Mo i Rana to Bodo, 231km
R09 - Roundtour Bodo to Lofoten part 1, 314km
R10 - Roundtour Bodo to Lofoten part 2, 250km
R11 - Roundtour Bodo to Lofoten part 3, 291km
R12 - Bodo to Arjeplog, 295km
R13 - Arjeplog to Jokkmokk, 244km
R14 - Jokkmokk to Pajala, 239km
R15 - Roundtour Sirkka to North Cape part 1, 257km
R16 - Roundtour Sirkka to North Cape part 2, 300km
R17 - Roundtour Sirkka to North Cape part 3, 244km
R18 - Roundtour Sirkka to North Cape part 4, 275km
R19 - Roundtour Sirkka to North Cape part 5, 332km
R20 - Sirkka to Kemi, 299km
R21 - Kemi to Ylivieska, 251km
R22 - Ylivieska to Jalasjarvi, 236km
R23 - Jalasjarvi to Turku, 279km
R24 - Stockholm to Askersund, 271km
R25 - Askersund to Varnamo, 224
R26 - Varnamo to Trelleborg, 259km

Have fun riding these routes!

12
Routes
3664.71
Kilometers
122.32
Hours
View route collection In 12 Days from Oslo to the North Cape
About this route collection
This is a route collection of a motorcycle tour from Oslo to the North Cape, based on a journey by Thomas Falck Østli. A total of twelve routes have been described, but the tour can be extended to more days, more information about this in the reviews.

The routes run through the beautiful landscapes of Norway, including the Lofoten, with many lakes, fjords, rivers, beautiful bridges, beautiful green forests and rugged mountains. During the trip there are also many ferry crossings, keep this in mind in your planning.

You drive longer distances in Norway without encountering a gas station or a restaurant, keep this in mind before you drive. Make sure your tank is full and bring food and drinks. Bring a few bottles of water or Camel bag and fill it up when you stop to refuel. Along the way, breaks are planned for refueling, eating and drinking.

The total trip of almost 3700 kilometers is broken down as follows;

• Day 1 is a 434 kilometer drive from Oslo to Geiranger
• Day 2 is a 238 kilometer drive from Geiranger to Kristiansund
• Day 3 is a 298 kilometer drive from Kristiansund via Trondheim to Verdal
• Day 4 is a 333 kilometer drive from Verdal to Brønnøysund
• Day 5 is a 267 kilometer drive from Brønnøysund to Furøy
• Day 6 is a 296 kilometer drive from Furøy Lofoten to Reine
• Day 7 is a 218 kilometer drive from Reine to Ørsvågvær
• Day 8 is a 274 kilometer drive from Ørsvågvær to Straumsjøen
• Day 9 is a 327 kilometer drive from Straumsjøen to Senjahopen
• Day 10 is a 321 kilometer drive from Senjahopen to Tromsø
• Day 11 is a 420 kilometer drive from Tromsø to Alta
• Day 12 is a 239 km drive from Alta via the North Cape to Skarsvåg

You have the choice to stay overnight at campsites or in hotels. Hotel prices in Norway are not particularly high and breakfast is usually included.
Camping is free almost everywhere, except on private property or where camping is prohibited, indicated by prohibition signs.
If you don't want to camp, there are often cabins for rent on the campsites. For a trip through Norway it is always advisable to bring a tent and other camping gear.
Information about hotels and campsites is included in the directions

Have fun reading, planning and driving this scenic journey to the northernmost tip of Europe.
14
Routes
4132.83
Kilometers
90.31
Hours
View route collection Top Car and Motor tour through Sweden and Norway
About this route collection
Sweden and Norway are beautiful countries. You will find nice cities, but also impressive nature reserves. This versatility makes Sweden & Norway the perfect countries for an impressive motorcycle vacation.

In this collection 14 beautiful routes through Sweden & Norway.

Good preparation is half the battle, so please read the tips below carefully.
1. Check the weather forecast. It can be very hot in Sweden & Norway, but it can also get very cold. Always check the weather forecast before you go, so that you can pack the right clothes.
2. Determine in advance which route or routes you want to follow. That way you don't drive like a chicken without a head and you can make the most of your days off in these beautiful countries.
3. Learn about traffic rules. Slightly different rules apply in Sweden & Norway in some situations than in the Netherlands. By delving into the traffic rules, you prevent that you (unknowingly) commit a traffic violation and / or put yourself in a dangerous situation.

Furthermore, it is wise to book the accommodations in advance. It may be more fun to drive through these countries on the receipt, but you don't want to have to drive around endlessly to find a place to sleep. If you go to Sweden or Norway in the high season, the chance that you have to look for a place to sleep is greatest. It is also possible to camp during your motorcycle trip, but then find out in advance where this is and is not allowed. You cannot pitch your tent everywhere.

As the largest country in Scandinavia you can go on extensive tours in a unique environment. Forests, lakes, nature parks and agricultural areas largely determine the landscape, which also consists of flat parts and rolling hills. Around the Swedish-Norwegian border lies the Scandinavian Highland, where the mountains rise locally to 2100 meters.

Norway is known for its amazing natural beauty. Fjords that tens of miles into the country, snow-covered high plains, sharp mountain peaks and vast forests. In this sparsely populated country, most people live in the cities, the capital of which is Oslo.

Tolls must be paid on a large number of roads in Norway. Anyone approaching a toll road can simply drive on without stopping. With cameras above the road, the license plate of the vehicle is scanned, not the license plate of the trailer or caravan. It takes a long time for the photos to be processed.
The bill is then sent to the Euro Parking Collection (EPC) in London within four to six months.

Mandatory on the motorcycle: Safety vest - A motorcyclist must bring at least one safety vest. In the event of a breakdown or accident, the driver is obliged to wear a safety vest. The ANWB advises motorcyclists to also take a safety vest for a possible passenger.
Advice: First aid kit, motorcyclists are advised to bring a first aid kit.
5
Routes
1277.69
Kilometers
37.77
Hours
View route collection The Top 5 Car and Motor Routes around the Norwegian Fjords
About this route collection
Norway, who doesn't want to go on a motorcycle or car (camper)? Norway, officially the Kingdom of Norway, is a country in Northern Europe. Norway is located on the western part of the Scandinavian Peninsula and borders Sweden, Finland and Russia.

Just to Norway, forget it! You don't go to Norway for a while, take at least 14 days to absorb all the beauty of Norway. The 5 routes along the most famous fjords of Norway can be the start of an unforgettable holiday. In terms of natural beauty, Norway is certainly in the top ten most desirable holiday countries. Fjords, snowy peaks, mirroring lakes: every square meter is a treat.

Some of the Top 10 tips from the ANWB are included in these 5 routes, such as:

Preikestolen
Hint in advance: you should not suffer from fear of heights when you visit Norway's most popular vantage point. Preikestolen is a super-steep rock that towers 604 meters above the Lysefjord. In fact, you get two for the price of one, because the four-kilometer walk to the vantage point is just as phenomenal. Preikestolen is even the most popular Norwegian hiking destination.

Fjords
They are considered to be one of the world's most beautiful natural wonders: the imposing Norwegian fjords. Millions of years ago they were worn out by huge ice masses. It is an unforgettable experience to sail on a ship between the steep rock walls, but you can also admire the fjords from various vantage points. Spectacular include Geirangerfjord, Trollfjord, Sognefjord and Hardangerfjord. Certainly one of the most beautiful sights in Norway.

Trollstigen
The Trollstigen, also known as the Troll route, has what you call the wow factor. You will experience no less than 11 hairpin bends on the 20-kilometer route; the average increase is 8 percent with a maximum of 10 percent. A pill against motion sickness can do no harm ... On the way it is a celebration of waterfalls, steep mountain walls and fjords. Bonus: the beautiful view of the Geirangerfjord.

All routes in this collection have been checked and made the same for TomTom, Garmin and MyRoute-app Navigation!

Have fun with this collection and while driving one of these routes. Enjoy all the beauty that Norway has to offer. Click on “View route” to read the review of the chosen route.
5
Routes
1801.3
Kilometers
42.79
Hours
Show region map
Akershus Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Akershus", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Akershus ([ˈɑ̂ːkəʂˌhʉːs] (listen)) is a traditional region and current electoral district in Norway, with Oslo as its main city and traditional capital. It is named for Akershus Fortress in Oslo. From the middle ages to 1919 Akershus was a fief and main county that included most of Eastern Norway; from the 17th century to 2020 Akershus also had a more narrow meaning as a (sub) county that included most of the Greater Oslo Region. From 2020 the former county of Akershus was merged into Viken along with the former counties of Østfold and Buskerud. Originally Akershus was one of four main fiefs in Norway and included almost all of Eastern Norway. The original Akershus became a main county (Stiftamt or Stift) in 1662 and was sometimes also known as Christiania Stift. It included several subcounties (Amt or Underamt); in 1682 its most central areas, consisting of modern Oslo and Akershus, became the subcounty of Akershus within the larger main county of the same name. In 1842 the capital city of Christiania, which at the time consisted of a tiny part of modern Oslo, became a separate subcounty within Akershus main county. The main county of Akershus was disestablished in 1919, and the subcounty continued as Akershus county (fylke). During its history Akershus (sub) county ceded territory to Oslo several times; Akershus' most central and important municipality, Aker, was transferred to Oslo in 1948. The remaining county of Akershus after 1948 borders Hedmark, Oppland, Buskerud, Oslo, and Østfold; it also has a short border with Sweden (Värmland). Akershus, with a little over 614,000 inhabitants, is the second most populated county by population after Oslo. The county administration is in central Oslo, which is not part of the modern county per se.
3
Routes
1029.3
Kilometers
21.11
Hours
Show region map
Aust Agder Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Aust Agder", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Aust-Agder ([ˈæ̂ʉstˌɑɡdər] (listen), English: East Agder) was one 18 counties (fylker) in Norway up to 1 January 2020, when it was merged with Vest-Agder to form Agder county. In 2002, there were 102,945 inhabitants, which was 2.2% of Norway's population. Its area was 9,212 square kilometres (3,557 sq mi). The county's administrative center was the town of Arendal. The county, on the Skagerrak coast, extended from Gjernestangen at Risør to the Kvåsefjorden in Lillesand. The inner parts of the area included Setesdalsheiene and Austheiene. Most of the population lives near the coast; about 78% of the county's inhabitants live in the five coastal municipalities of Arendal, Grimstad, Lillesand, Tvedestrand, and Risør. The rest of the county is sparsely populated. Tourism is important, as Arendal and the other coastal towns are popular attractions. The county includes the larger islands of Tromøya, Hisøya, Justøya, and Sandøya. The interior of the county encompasses the traditional district of Setesdal, through which the river Otra flows to the coast. In 2017, the Parliament of Norway voted to merge Aust-Agder and Vest-Agder counties into one large region, Agder, effective 1 January 2020.The county was part of the Aust-Agder District Court and the Church of Norway Diocese of Agder og Telemark.
3
Routes
1234.38
Kilometers
24.57
Hours
Show region map
Buskerud Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Buskerud", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Buskerud (Urban East Norwegian pronunciation: [ˈbʉ̂skərʉː] (listen)) is a traditional region, a former county and a current electoral district in Norway, bordering Akershus, Oslo, Oppland, Sogn og Fjordane, Hordaland, Telemark and Vestfold. The region extends from the Oslofjord and Drammensfjorden in the southeast to Hardangervidda mountain range in the northwest. The county administration was in modern times located in Drammen. Buskerud was merged with Akershus and Østfold into the newly created Viken County on 1 January 2020.
5
Routes
1478.16
Kilometers
41.18
Hours
Show region map
Finnmark Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Finnmark", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Finnmark ([ˈfɪ̀nnmɑrk] (listen); Northern Sami: Finnmárku; Kven: Finmarku; Finnish: Ruija) is a former county in the northern part of Norway. It was dissolved on 1 January 2020 when it was merged with the neighboring county of Troms to form the new Troms og Finnmark county. By land, it bordered Troms county to the west, Finland (Lapland region) to the south, and Russia (Murmansk Oblast) to the east, and by water, the Norwegian Sea (Atlantic Ocean) to the northwest, and the Barents Sea (Arctic Ocean) to the north and northeast. The county was formerly known as Finmarkens amt or Vardøhus amt. Starting in 2002, it had two official names: Finnmark (Norwegian) and Finnmárku (Northern Sami). It was part of the Sápmi region, which spans four countries, as well as the Barents Region, and is the largest and least populated county of Norway. Situated at the northernmost part of continental Europe, where the Norwegian coastline swings eastward, Finnmark is an area "where East meets West," in culture as well as in nature and geography. Vardø, the easternmost municipality in Norway, is located farther east than the cities of St. Petersburg and Istanbul. 4 municipalities (of the district's 18) had population increases, during Q1 in 2021: Alta, Tana, Berlevåg, Loppa.
6
Routes
2087.17
Kilometers
44.33
Hours
Show region map
Hedmark Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Hedmark", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Hedmark ([ˈhêːdmɑrk] (listen)) was a county in Norway before 1 January 2020, bordering Trøndelag to the north, Oppland to the west and Akershus to the south. The county administration is in Hamar. Hedmark and Oppland counties were merged into Innlandet county on 1 January 2020, when Norway's former 19 counties became 10 bigger counties / regions Hedmark made up the northeastern part of Østlandet, the southeastern part of the country. It had a long border with Sweden to the east (Dalarna County and Värmland County). The largest lakes were Femunden and Mjøsa, the largest lake in Norway. Parts of Glomma, Norway's longest river, flowed through Hedmark. Geographically, Hedmark was traditionally divided into: Hedemarken (east of the lake Mjøsa), Østerdalen ("East Valley" north of the town Elverum), and Solør / Glåmdalen (south of Elverum) and Odal in the very south. Hedmark and Oppland were the only Norwegian counties with no coastline. Hedmark also hosted some events of the 1994 Winter Olympic Games. Hamar, Kongsvinger, Elverum and Tynset were cities in the county. Hedmark was one of the less urbanized areas in Norway; about half of the inhabitants lived on rural land. The population was mainly concentrated in the rich agricultural district adjoining Mjøsa to the southeast. The county's extensive forests supplied much of Norway's timber; at one time, logs were floated down Glomma to the coast but are now transported by truck and train. The Hedmark municipality of Engerdal had the distinction of marking the current southernmost border in Norway of Sápmi, the traditional region of the Sami people. The county was divided into three traditional districts. Those were Hedmarken, Østerdalen and Solør (with Odalen and Vinger). Hedmark was originally a part of the large Akershus amt, but in 1757 Oplandenes amt was separated from it. Some years later, in 1781, this was divided into Kristians amt (now Oppland) and Hedemarkens amt. Until 1919, the county was called Hedemarkens amt.
6
Routes
1819.8
Kilometers
42.96
Hours
Show region map
Hordaland Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Hordaland", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Hordaland (Urban East Norwegian: [ˈhɔ̂rdɑlɑn] (listen)) was a county in Norway, bordering Sogn og Fjordane, Buskerud, Telemark, and Rogaland counties. Hordaland was the third largest county after Akershus and Oslo by population. The county government was the Hordaland County Municipality which is located in Bergen. Before 1972, the city of Bergen was its own separate county apart from Hordaland. On 1 January 2020, the county was merged with neighbouring Sogn og Fjordane county to form the new Vestland county.
12
Routes
4039.86
Kilometers
94.66
Hours
Show region map
More og Romsdal Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "More og Romsdal", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Møre og Romsdal (Urban East Norwegian: [ˈmø̂ːrə ɔ ˈrʊ̀msdɑːl] (listen); English: Møre and Romsdal) is a county in the northernmost part of Western Norway. It borders the counties of Trøndelag, Innlandet, and Vestland. The county administration is located in the town of Molde, while Ålesund is the largest town. The county is governed by the Møre og Romsdal County Municipality which includes an elected county council and a county mayor. The national government is represented by the county governor.
12
Routes
3387.16
Kilometers
111.57
Hours
Show region map
Nordland Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Nordland", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Nordland (Norwegian pronunciation: [ˈnûːrlɑn] (listen); Lule Sami: Nordlánnda, Southern Sami: Nordlaante, Northern Sami: Nordlánda, English: Northland) is a county in Norway in the Northern Norway region, bordering Troms og Finnmark in the north, Trøndelag in the south, Norrbotten County in Sweden to the east, Västerbotten County to the southeast, and the Atlantic Ocean (Norwegian Sea) to the west. The county was formerly known as Nordlandene amt. The county administration is in the town of Bodø. The remote Arctic island of Jan Mayen has been administered from Nordland since 1995. In the southern part is Vega, listed on the UNESCO World Heritage site list. The history of Nordland is a tale about the gifts from the sea: One of the most productive seas in the world providing food all year since ancient times, the same sea creates a climate more moderate than any other place in the arctic; even the bedrock itself enriched by sea living organisms millions of years ago in the geological past.
6
Routes
2315.06
Kilometers
48.95
Hours
Show region map
Oppland Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Oppland", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Oppland [ˈɔ̂plɑn] (listen) was until 1 January 2020 a county in Norway bordering to the counties of Trøndelag, Møre og Romsdal, Sogn og Fjordane, Buskerud, Akershus, Oslo and Hedmark. The county administration was located in Lillehammer. Oppland was, together with Hedmark, one of the only two landlocked counties of Norway. Oppland and Hedmark counties were merged on 1 January 2020 to become the new county Innlandet. Innlandet was one of several names proposed for the new administrative region consisting of Hedmark and Oppland. The two counties were re-merged after being split in 1781 (then called Hedemarkens amt and Kristians amt, respectively). Historically, the region was commonly known as "Opplandene".
4
Routes
1489.12
Kilometers
33.68
Hours
Show region map
Oslo Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Oslo", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Oslo ( OZ-loh, also US: OSS-loh, Norwegian: [ˈʊ̂ʂlʊ] (listen), rarely [ˈʊ̂slʊ, ˈʊ̀ʂlʊ]) is the capital and most populous city of Norway. It constitutes both a county and a municipality. As of 23 November 2020, the municipality of Oslo had a population of 697,549, while the population of the city's greater urban area was 1,019,513, as of 4 November 2019. The metropolitan area had an estimated population of 1.71 million.During the Viking Age the area was part of Viken. Oslo was founded as a city at the end of the Viking Age in the year 1040 under the name Ánslo, and established as a kaupstad or trading place in 1048 by Harald Hardrada. The city was elevated to a bishopric in 1070 and a capital under Haakon V of Norway around 1300. Personal unions with Denmark from 1397 to 1523 and again from 1536 to 1814 reduced its influence. After being destroyed by a fire in 1624, during the reign of King Christian IV, a new city was built closer to Akershus Fortress and named Christiania in honour of the king. It became a municipality (formannskapsdistrikt) on 1 January 1838. The city functioned as the capital of Norway during the 1814–1905 union between Sweden and Norway. From 1877, the city's name was spelled Kristiania in government usage, a spelling that was adopted by the municipal authorities in 1897. In 1925, the city, after incorporating the village retaining its former name, was renamed Oslo. In 1948 Oslo merged with Aker, a municipality which surrounded the capital and which was 27 times larger, thus creating the modern, much larger Oslo municipality. Oslo is the economic and governmental centre of Norway. The city is also a hub of Norwegian trade, banking, industry and shipping. It is an important centre for maritime industries and maritime trade in Europe. The city is home to many companies within the maritime sector, some of which are among the world's largest shipping companies, shipbrokers and maritime insurance brokers. Oslo is a pilot city of the Council of Europe and the European Commission intercultural cities programme. Oslo is considered a global city and was ranked "Beta World City" in studies carried out by the Globalization and World Cities Study Group and Network in 2008. It was ranked number one in terms of quality of life among European large cities in the European Cities of the Future 2012 report by fDi magazine. A survey conducted by ECA International in 2011 placed Oslo as the second most expensive city in the world for living expenses after Tokyo. In 2013 Oslo tied with the Australian city of Melbourne as the fourth most expensive city in the world, according to the Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU)'s Worldwide Cost of Living study. Oslo was ranked as the 24th most liveable city in the world by Monocle magazine.Oslo's population was increasing at record rates during the early 2000s, making it the fastest growing major city in Europe at the time. This growth stems for the most part from international immigration and related high birth rates, but also from intra-national migration. By 2010 the immigrant population in the city was growing somewhat faster than the Norwegian population, and in the city proper this had become more than 25% of the total population if the children of immigrant parents are included.
6
Routes
1781.01
Kilometers
48.72
Hours
Show region map
Rogaland Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Rogaland", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Rogaland ([ˈrûːɡɑlɑn] (listen)) is a county in Western Norway, bordering the North Sea to the west and counties Vestland to the north, Vestfold og Telemark to the east and Agder to the east and southeast. In 2020, it had a population of 479,892. The administrative centre of the county is the city of Stavanger, which is one of the largest cities in Norway. Rogaland is the centre of the Norwegian petroleum industry. In 2016, Rogaland had an unemployment rate of 4.9%, one of the highest in Norway. In 2015, Rogaland had a fertility rate of 1.78 children per woman, which is the highest in the country. The Diocese of Stavanger for the Church of Norway includes all of Rogaland county.
9
Routes
2985.09
Kilometers
68.31
Hours
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Sogn og Fjordane Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Sogn og Fjordane", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Sogn og Fjordane (Urban East Norwegian: [ˈsɔŋn ɔ ˈfjûːɾɑnə] (listen), English: Sogn and Fjordane) was, up to 1 January 2020, a county in western Norway, when it was merged to become part of Vestland county. Bordering previous counties Møre og Romsdal, Oppland, Buskerud, and Hordaland, the county administration was in the village of Hermansverk in Leikanger municipality. The largest town in the county was Førde. Although Sogn og Fjordane has some industry, predominantly hydroelectricity and aluminium, it is predominantly an agricultural area. Sogn og Fjordane is also home to the Urnes Stave Church and the Nærøyfjord, which are both listed by UNESCO as world heritage sites. The Western Norway University of Applied Sciences has campuses in Sogndal and Førde.
7
Routes
2119.06
Kilometers
53.73
Hours
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Trondelag Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Trondelag", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Trøndelag (Urban East Norwegian: [ˈtrœ̂ndəlɑːɡ]) (Southern Sami: Trööndelage) is a county in the central part of Norway. It was created in 1687, then named Trondhjem County (Norwegian: Trondhjems Amt); in 1804 the county was split into Nord-Trøndelag and Sør-Trøndelag by the King of Denmark-Norway, and the counties were reunited in 2018 after a vote of the two counties in 2016.The largest city in Trøndelag is the city of Trondheim. The administrative centre is Steinkjer, while Trondheim functions as the office of the county mayor. Both cities serve the office of the county governor; however, Steinkjer houses the main functions.Trøndelag county and the neighbouring Møre og Romsdal county together form what is known as Central Norway. A person from Trøndelag is called a trønder. The dialect spoken in the area, trøndersk, is characterized by dropping out most vowel endings; see apocope. Trøndelag is one of the most fertile regions of Norway, with large agricultural output. The majority of the production ends up in the Norwegian cooperative system for meat and milk, but farm produce is a steadily growing business.
4
Routes
1289.07
Kilometers
27.26
Hours
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Telemark Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Telemark", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Telemark [ˈtêːləmɑrk] (listen) is a traditional region, a former county and a current electoral district in Norway. In 2020, Telemark merged with the former county of Vestfold to form the county of Vestfold og Telemark. Telemark borders the traditional regions and former counties of Vestfold, Buskerud, Hordaland, Rogaland and Aust-Agder.The name Telemark means the "mark of the Thelir", the ancient North Germanic tribe that inhabited what is now known as Upper Telemark in the Migration Period and the Viking Age. In the Middle Ages, the agricultural society of Upper Telemark was considered the most violent region of Norway. Today, half of the buildings from medieval times in Norway are located here. The dialects spoken in Upper Telemark also retain more elements of Old Norse than those spoken elsewhere in the country. Upper Telemark is also known as the birthplace of skiing.The southern part of Telemark, Grenland, is more urban and influenced by trade with the Low Countries, northern Germany, Denmark and the British Isles. Telemark has been one of Norway's most important industrial regions for centuries, marked in particular by the Norske Skog Union paper mills in Grenland and the Norsk Hydro heavy water and fertilizer production in Upper Telemark.
4
Routes
1319.07
Kilometers
39.01
Hours
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Troms Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Troms", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Troms (pronounced [trʊms] (listen), Northern Sami: Romsa, Kven: Tromssa, Finnish: Tromssa) is a former county in northern Norway. On 1 January 2020 it was merged with the neighboring Finnmark county to create the new Troms og Finnmark county. It bordered Finnmark county to the northeast and Nordland county in the southwest. Norrbotten Län in Sweden is located to the south and further southeast is a shorter border with Lapland Province in Finland. To the west is the Norwegian Sea (Atlantic Ocean). The entire county, which was established in 1866, was located north of the Arctic Circle. The Troms County Municipality was the governing body for the county, elected by the people of Troms, while the Troms county governor was a representative of the King and Government of Norway. The county had a population of 161,771 in 2014.
3
Routes
872.68
Kilometers
24.44
Hours
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Vest Agder Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Vest Agder", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Vest-Agder [ˈvɛ̂stˌɑɡdər] (listen) (West Agder) was one of 18 counties (fylker) in Norway up until 1 January 2020, when it was merged with Aust-Agder to form Agder county. In 2016, there were 182,701 inhabitants, around 3.5% of the total population of Norway. Its area was about 7,277 square kilometres (2,810 sq mi). The county administration was located in its largest city, Kristiansand. Vest-Agder was a major source of timber for Dutch and later English shipping from the 16th century onwards. Historically, the area exported timber, wooden products, salmon, herring, ships, and later nickel, paper, and ferrous and silica alloys. Compared to other counties of Norway, Today's exports-intensive industry produces shipping and offshore equipment (National Oilwell Varco), cranes (Cargotec), ships (Umoe Mandal, Flekkefjord Slip), wind turbine equipment, nickel (Glencore), and solar industry microsilica (Elkem). A major tourist attraction is Kristiansand Dyrepark. Vest-Agder grew to political prominance with the decision of King Christian IV to establish Kristiansand as a key naval base, trading center, and bishopric in 1641, forcing urban citizens and merchants from all over Agder to settle in the city. The county had large-scale emigration to North America from the 1850s onwards.
2
Routes
610.47
Kilometers
13.06
Hours
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Vestfold Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Vestfold", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Vestfold [ˈvɛ̂stfɔɫ] (listen) is a traditional region, a former county and a current electoral district in Eastern Norway. In 2020 the county became part of the much larger county of Vestfold og Telemark. Located on the western shore of the Oslofjord, it bordered the previous Buskerud and Telemark counties. The county administration was located in Tønsberg, Norway's oldest city, and the largest city is Sandefjord. With the exception of the city-county of Oslo, Vestfold was the smallest county in Norway by Area Vestfold was the only county in which all municipalities had declared Bokmål to be their sole official written form of the Norwegian language.Vestfold was located west of the Oslofjord, as the name indicates. It included many smaller, but well-known towns in Norway, such as Larvik, Sandefjord, Tønsberg and Horten; these towns run from Oslo in an almost constant belt of urban areas along the coast, ending in Grenland in neighbouring region Telemark. The river Numedalslågen runs through the county. Many islands are located at the coast. Vestfold is mostly dominated by lowland and is among the best agricultural areas of Norway. Winters last about three months, while pleasant summer temperatures last from May to September, with a July average high of 17 °C (63 °F).Vestfold was traditionally known for shipping and sailing. Sandefjord was formerly a headquarters for the Norwegian whaling fleet, and Horten used to be an important naval port. The coastal towns of Vestfold now engage in fishing and shipbuilding. Some lumbering is carried on in the interior. The area also includes some of the best farmland in Norway. Vestfold merged with neighboring Telemark County on 1 January 2020 as part of a nationwide municipal reform. The new county name is Vestfold og Telemark.
5
Routes
1481.37
Kilometers
44.28
Hours
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Ostfold Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Ostfold", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Østfold [ˈœ̂stfɔɫ] (listen) is a traditional region, a former county and a current electoral district in southeastern Norway. It borders Akershus and southwestern Sweden (Västra Götaland County and Värmland), while Buskerud and Vestfold are on the other side of Oslofjord. The county's administrative seat was Sarpsborg. The county controversially became part of the newly established Viken County on 1 January 2020. Many manufacturing facilities are situated here, such as the world's most advanced biorefinery, Borregaard in Sarpsborg. Fredrikstad has shipyards. There are granite mines in Østfold and stone from these were used by Gustav Vigeland. The county slogan is "The heartland of Scandinavia". The local dialect is characterized by its geographical proximity to Sweden.
2
Routes
577.28
Kilometers
14.08
Hours
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Varmlands lan Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Varmlands lan", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Värmland County (Värmlands län) is a county or län in west central Sweden. It borders the Swedish counties of Dalarna, Örebro and Västra Götaland, as well as the Norwegian counties of Viken and Innlandet to the west. Prince Carl Philip is Duke of Värmland.
3
Routes
914.45
Kilometers
26.06
Hours
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Vastra Gotalands lan Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Vastra Gotalands lan", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Västra Götaland County (Swedish: Västra Götalands län) is a county or län on the western coast of Sweden. The county is the second largest (in terms of population) of Sweden's counties and it is subdivided into 49 municipalities (kommuner). Its population of 1,616,000 amounts to 17% of Sweden's population. The formal capital and seat of the governor of Västra Götaland County is Gothenburg. The political capital and seat of the Västra Götaland Regional Council is Vänersborg. The county was established in 1 January 1998, when Älvsborg County, Gothenburg and Bohus County and Skaraborg County were merged.
2
Routes
574.68
Kilometers
15.5
Hours
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Lapland Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Lapland", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Lapland may refer to:
Geirangerfjord
14-07-2019
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R12 Asgardstrand Ulricehamn
03-01-2020
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Flateland via Telemark Vradal Kongsberg Vikersund to Oslo
03-06-2020
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R06 Savalen Hjelledalen
03-01-2020
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Rondreis Noorwegen - dag 1 Brevik - Stavanger
11-02-2019
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Rondreis Noorwegen - dag 2 Stavanger - Ulvik
14-02-2019
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R08 Hjelledalen Norheimsund
03-01-2020
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R09 Norheimsund Byrkjedal
03-01-2020
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R10 Byrkjedal Austbo
03-01-2020
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R11 Austbo Asgardstrand
03-01-2020
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