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The prettiest verified routes in Poland

 
MyRoute-app helps you with planning your dream journey! All routes on the page have been verified by our RouteXperts. De routes are categorized in regions, when you click on 'view region' you will see all verified routes for that region that are free to use.
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57
Amount of active RouteXperts (worldwide)
1103
Amount of routes reviewed by RouteXperts (worldwide)
53877
Amount of downloaded routes (worldwide)
5560
Amount of visits (Poland)
7
Amount of routes verified by RouteXperts (Poland)
70
Amount of downloaded routes (Poland)
Route collections
The route collections by MyRoute-app are collections of multiple routes that belong to each other and checked by MRA RouteXperts. All routes are identical for TomTom, Garmin and MyRoute-app Navigation.
11
Routes
2502.87
Kilometers
54.69
Hours
View route collection Tour Poland Slovakia and the Czech Republic
About this route collection
This collection of routes is based on a 3-week vacation that I rode with my partner in June 2018.

The journey goes through Poland, Slovakia, the Czech Republic and a piece of Germany. In total there are 11 driving days, a combination of touristic tours and routes from A to B. All routes avoid the highway and go exclusively on the smaller roads, which makes it a beautiful and varied journey.

Along the way you regularly come across sights, where you can stop to look around. These vary from beautiful viewpoints, to museums and special buildings. You also visit various national nature parks along the way, such as the Tatra Mountains, the Giant Mountains, Eagle Mountains, Krkonoše and Bohemian Switzerland. Because the overnight places are often also located in these areas, you can alternate the driving days with days with wonderful hiking trips.

If you only want to ride a motorcycle, then this collection can also be done in 2 weeks (including a return trip from the Netherlands).

The routes themselves can be challenging from time to time, particularly because the quality of the road surface in Eastern Europe - especially on the small country roads - is not always good. In June 2018 all routes were on paved roads.
3
Routes
639.6
Kilometers
14.36
Hours
Show region map
Lesser Poland Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Lesser Poland", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Lesser Poland, often known by its Polish name Małopolska (Latin: Polonia Minor), is a historical region situated in southern and south-eastern Poland. Its capital and largest city is Kraków. Throughout centuries, Lesser Poland developed a separate culture featuring diverse architecture, folk costumes, dances, cuisine, traditions and a rare Lesser Polish dialect. The region is rich in historical landmarks, monuments, castles, natural scenery and UNESCO World Heritage Sites. The region should not be confused with the modern Lesser Poland Voivodeship, which covers only the southwestern part of Lesser Poland. Historical Lesser Poland was much larger than the current voivodeship that bears its name. It reached from Bielsko-Biała in the southwest as far as to Siedlce in the northeast. It consisted of the three voivodeships of Kraków, Sandomierz and Lublin. It comprised almost 60,000 km2 in area; today's population in this area is about 9,000,000 inhabitants. Its landscape is mainly hilly, with the Carpathian Mountains and Tatra Mountain Range in the south; it is located in the basin of the upper Vistula river. It has been noted for its mighty aristocracy (magnateria) and wealthy nobility (szlachta).Between the 14th and 18th century, the Lesser Poland Province of the Polish Crown also encompassed the historical region of Red Ruthenia. In the era of partitions, the southern part of Lesser Poland became known as Galicia, which was under Austrian control until Poland regained its independence in 1918. As a result of this long-lasting division, many inhabitants of the northern part of Lesser Poland (including those in such cities as Lublin, Radom, Kielce and Częstochowa) do not recognize their Lesser Polish identity. However, while Lublin (Lubelskie) was declared an independent Voivodeship as early as 1474, it still has speakers of the Lesser Polish dialect. Across history, many ethnic and religious minorities existed in Lesser Poland as they fled persecution from other areas or countries. Poland's once tolerant policy towards these minorities allowed them to flourish and create separate self-governing communities. Some minorities still remain, but are on the verge of extinction, most notably Wymysorys-speaking Vilamovians, Halcnovians, Gorals, Lemkos, Uplanders, and once Polish Jews and Walddeutsche Germans.
1
Routes
213.34
Kilometers
5.36
Hours
Show region map
Silesia Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Silesia", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Silesia (, also UK: , US: ) is a historical region of Central Europe located mostly in Poland, with small parts in the Czech Republic and Germany. Its area is approximately 40,000 km2 (15,400 sq mi) and the population is estimated at around 8,000,000 inhabitants. Silesia is split into two main sub-regions of Lower Silesia in the west and Upper Silesia in the east. Throughout history, Silesia developed a unique culture featuring diverse architecture, costumes, cuisine, traditions and the Silesian language. Silesia is located along the Oder River, with the Sudeten Mountains extending across the southern border. The region possesses many historical landmarks and UNESCO World Heritage Sites. It is also rich in mineral and natural resources, and includes several important industrial areas. Silesia's largest city and historical capital is Wrocław. The biggest metropolitan area is the Upper Silesian metropolitan area, the centre of which is Katowice. Parts of the Czech city of Ostrava and the German city of Görlitz fall within the borders of Silesia. Silesia's borders and national affiliation have changed over time, both when it was a hereditary possession of noble houses and after the rise of modern nation-states. The varied history with changing aristocratic possessions resulted in an abundance of castles, especially in the Jelenia Góra valley. The first known states to hold power in Silesia were probably those of Greater Moravia at the end of the 9th century and Bohemia early in the 10th century. In the 10th century, Silesia was incorporated into the early Polish state, and after its division in the 12th century became a Piast duchy. In the 14th century, it became a constituent part of the Bohemian Crown Lands under the Holy Roman Empire, which passed to the Austrian Habsburg Monarchy in 1526. As a result of the Silesian Wars, the region was annexed by Prussia in 1742. After World War I, the easternmost part of Upper Silesia was granted to Poland by the Entente Powers after insurrections by Poles and the Upper Silesian plebiscite. The remaining former Austrian parts of Silesia were partitioned to Czechoslovakia, forming part of Czechoslovakia's Sudetenland region, and are today part of the Czech Republic. In 1945, after World War II, the bulk of Silesia was transferred to Polish jurisdiction by the Potsdam Agreement between the victorious Allies and became part of Poland, whose Communist government expelled the majority of Silesia's previous population. The small Lusatian strip west of the Oder–Neisse line, which had belonged to Silesia since 1815, remained in Germany. As the result of the forced population shifts of 1945–48, today's inhabitants of Silesia speak the national languages of their respective countries. Previously German-speaking Lower Silesia has developed a new mixed Polish dialect and novel costumes. An ongoing debate exists whether the Silesian speech should be considered a dialect of Polish or a separate language. The Lower Silesian German dialect is nearing extinction due to their speakers' expulsion.
1
Routes
168.43
Kilometers
3.27
Hours
Show region map
Subcarpathia Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Subcarpathia", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Subcarpathia may refer to: geographical region of Outer Subcarpathia Polish Subcarpathia, section of outer-subcarpathian region in modern Poland Ukrainian Subcarpathia, section of outer-subcarpathian region in modern Ukraine Bukovinian Subcarpathia, section of outer-subcarpathians in the region of Bukovina Moldavian Subcarpathia, section of outer-subcarpathians in the region of Moldaviageographical region of Inner Subcarpathia Region of Subcarpathia (1919-1938), administrative region in the First Czechoslovak Republic Autonomous Subcarpathia (1938-1939), autonomous region in the Second Czechoslovak Republic Governorate of Subcarpathia, civil administration established after the annexation by Hungary in 1939
3
Routes
646.32
Kilometers
15.15
Hours
Show region map
Lower Silesia Open region
The images and text displayed here originate from the Wikipedia article "Lower Silesia", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.
About this region
Lower Silesia (Polish: Dolny Śląsk; German: Niederschlesien; Czech: Dolní Slezsko; Latin: Silesia Inferior; Silesian German: Niederschläsing; Silesian: Dolny Ślůnsk) is the northwestern part of the historical and geographical region of Silesia; Upper Silesia is to the southeast. In the Middle Ages Lower Silesia was part of Piast-ruled Poland. It was one of the leading regions of Poland, and its capital Wrocław was one of the main cities of the Polish Kingdom. Lower Silesia emerged as a distinctive region during the fragmentation of Poland, in 1172, when the Duchies of Opole and Racibórz, considered Upper Silesia since, were formed of the eastern part of the Duchy of Silesia, and the remaining, western part was since considered Lower Silesia. During the Ostsiedlung, German settlers came to Lower Silesia and the region was largely Germanized. In the late Middle Ages the region fell under the overlordship of the Kingdom of Bohemia, however large parts remained under the rule of local Polish dukes of the Piast dynasty, some up to the 16th and 17th century. Briefly under the suzerainty of Kingdom of Hungary, it fell to the Austrian Habsburg Monarchy in 1526. In 1742, Austria ceded nearly all of Lower Silesia to the Kingdom of Prussia in the Treaty of Berlin, except for the southern part of the Duchy of Nysa. Within the Prussian kingdom, the region became part of the Province of Silesia. In 1871, Lower Silesia was integrated into the German Empire. After World War I, the region became a separate province within the Weimar Republic. After 1945, the main part of the former Prussian province fell to the Republic of Poland, while a smaller part west of the Oder-Neisse line remained within East Germany and historical parts of Austrian Lower Silesia (Jesenicko, Opavsko regions) remained as a part of Czechoslovakia. By 1949, almost the entire indigenous German population was expelled.The region is known for an abundance of historic architecture of various styles, including many castles and palaces, well preserved or reconstructed old towns, numerous spa towns, and historic burial sites of Polish monarchs and consorts (in Wrocław, Legnica and Trzebnica).
Bieszczady - a big loop
13-03-2019
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Rondrit Tatra Gebergte via Polen en Slowakije
19-10-2019
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Auschwitz naar Zakopane
19-10-2019
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Rondrit Reuzengebergte Tsjechie en Polen
19-10-2019
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Rondrit Jesenik en Orlice gebergte
06-12-2019
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Pastviny naar Spindleruv Mlyn
19-10-2019
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Zakopane naar Frydland
19-10-2019
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